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Body of executed Aum cult founder Asahara cremated in Tokyo

26 Comments

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26 Comments
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Hopefully the fourth daughter flushes them down the toilet where they belong.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Would it be wrong to suggest they could have combined the two processes of execution and cremation?

0 ( +6 / -6 )

How did the americans deal with Bin-Ladin's body? Dispose of it at sea! They wont setup a shrine to worship him then!

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Good! Put the trash where it belongs. Good riddance!

0 ( +5 / -5 )

klausdorth: I was more imply (without trying to be too graphic) of actually making the creamation his execution. Hence combining the two..

And then dump those ashes out at sea..

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Great, now those Aum losers will make a new holiday for themselves, Ash Monday.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

The martyring of this whacko continues! I guess we can thank the media for that.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Rather disturbing that the daughter and wife want this monster’s remains. They should be disposed of by the government, lest he is turned into a martyr as Disillusioned suggests, or has some sort of shrine made for him.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Correction: it is the “other children” that are requesting his remains, not the fourth daughter.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

There's a big difference between Western cremation which reduces the body to nothing more than ashes bu Japanese cremation is at lower temperatures to preserve the bones from which the relatives select seven important ones with chop sticks, then the remaining bones. The bones are placed in an urn and put into a family grave.

I prefer the Western way. Unfortunately witnessed it two times myself. The forcefully breaking pieces of the bones with chopsticks of a cremated relative seems very cold and macabre even though the person is not alive.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

There's a big difference between Western cremation which reduces the body to nothing more than ashes bu Japanese cremation is at lower temperatures to preserve the bones from which the relatives select seven important ones with chop sticks, then the remaining bones. The bones are placed in an urn and put into a family grave.

I can't imagine having to pick through the bones of your dead relatives and break them with chop sticks. That's pretty morbid.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

They paid for theirs sins once they're dead. Just leave them be... I bet the Japanese authorities are doing absolutely everything by the freakin' book, especially in this case, so any complaints, suggestions, etc are out of line.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I am sure the authorities will do what is required by Japanese law, however in this case there is a danger that their remains could lead to further trouble, so I Agree with the posters above that it would be better to dispose of the remains in away that prevents martyrdom or glorification.

Dump out to sea in a secret location would be my choice.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Throw them in the sea, like they do with all dead scumbags, stops their graves or memorials becoming shrines.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

 can't imagine having to pick through the bones of your dead relatives and break them with chop sticks. That's pretty morbid.

Try to imagine that this is part of Japanese culture. Respect it.

https://scattering-ashes.co.uk/different-cultures/japanese-cremation-ashes-rituals-kotsuage-bunkotsu/

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

There's a big difference between Western cremation which reduces the body to nothing more than ashes bu Japanese cremation is at lower temperatures to preserve the bones...

> I prefer the Western way. Unfortunately witnessed it two times myself. The forcefully breaking pieces of the bones with chopsticks of a cremated relative seems very cold and macabre even though the person is not alive.

This is a common misconception. Bones are not cremated into the fine powdery ash you see in the west. They are cremated, and then the bone fragments are placed in a pulverizer, which grinds them int the "ash" you receive. Strictly speaking, it's not ash, but pulverized bone powder.

Maybe that bit of info will help make the Japanese way seem less cold and macabre.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Im not christian but when i go my mrs is under instruction to cremate me in the christian fashion and then drop me in the sea, funnily enough she wants the same.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

They should dump his ashes in the Devils Pit Onsen in Kyushu.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

to cremate me in the christian fashion and then drop me in the sea, funnily enough she wants the same.

There's nothing christian about cremating and 'dropping' in the sea :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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