crime

Car hits and kills 15-year-old cyclist; driver arrested

27 Comments

Police in Honjo, Saitama Prefecture, have arrested a 48-year-old man on suspicion of reckless driving resulting in death after the car he was driving hit and killed a 15-year-old boy riding a bicycle.

According to police, the incident occurred at around 8 a.m. Sunday, Fuji TV reported. The boy, Yu Mamiya, was on his way to a prep exam when he was hit head-on by a car driven by Ikuyo Higuchi, a part-time worker. There was no sidewalk and the boy was riding his bike along the side of the road  

Mamiya was taken to hospital where he died about an hour later.

Higuchi was quoted by police as saying he wasn't paying close attention to what was in front of him.

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27 Comments
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tragedy, R.i.p ,, but head on collision = one was using the wrong lane,, most likely the bicycle mmmm mby suicide attempt but of course the driver got arrested,,, experienced that a few times already that a bicycle is just coming from nowhere and only by luck and quick reaction could avoid a collision

-14 ( +6 / -20 )

tragedy, R.i.p ,, but head on collision = one was using the wrong lane,, most likely the bicycle mmmm mby suicide attempt but of course the driver got arrested,,, experienced that a few times already that a bicycle is just coming from nowhere and only by luck and quick reaction could avoid a collision

Did you even read the article? The driver himself admits he wasn't paying attention to the road. Its beyond disgusting to be attributing this to a suicide on the poor kid's part based on no evidence whatsoever, what is wrong with you?

12 ( +14 / -2 )

Terrible tragedy. Sad thoughts towards the Family of the young man, a loss such as theirs is something I hope no Parent ever has to experience.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Yesterday there was a boy riding his cycle up ahead on the wrong side of the road and there was a car approaching him. He looked to be timing a flickover to this side of the road, and I hoped that he would see me coming from behind. As the approaching car past him, he started to wing it over the road, but luckily he looked behind him, saw me, and quickly changed his mind. I was ready to slam on the brakes, but if he had gone through with his plan, and if I had hit him, I am guessing that I would have had to take the blame. The above article reminded me of how many potential dangers there are out there on the roads, especially juggling with bicycles. I am sorry for the boy, but also in a different way for the driver who hit him.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Higuchi was quoted by police as saying he wasn't paying close attention to what was in front of him.

So, another distracted Japanese driver causes a death. It seems to be a way too common scenario. There has been at least two accidents with the same scenario every week for the last few months. Also, one of my friends is still in hospital after getting rear-ended at full speed by some twit staring at his phone. Perhaps, just perhaps, the J-cops need to get out of their kobans and start getting these reckless idiots off the roads. I drive every day and at least 50% of the drivers I see are busy multitasking while they driving. Talking on the phone, texting, playing video games, watching TV, putting on make up, reading newspapers, shaving, the list goes on and on! It's not only dangerous, it is bloody disgraceful that so many drivers are so careless and couldn't give a fat rat's about anybody else using the roads. Driving a car is a privilege, not a right and abuse of those privileges should result in having those privileges taken away.

12 ( +14 / -2 )

Not always. Sometimes it is the elderly and women or minorities.

Those narratives tend to be largely blown out of proportion by politics.

Children slip under the radar much more, mostly because their suffering is harder to use for political gain. Like the old Simpsons joke goes, "Won't somebody please think of the children?!" It's a joke to think of the kids. Why? Probably because it draws attention away from professional grievance-mongering groups.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

No info about whether the boy was wearing a helmet... Most likely, not. I am not sure if it could have saved his life, but helmets should be made mandatory for cyclists. Anyway, this is sad beyond words.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

So, Mr Higuchi must have veered over to the wrong side of the road?

The boy was on the same side of the road going against traffic to e hit head on?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My impression from the article above kurispisu, is that yes, the driver was going straight ahead, and the cyclist was on the same side of the road coming straight towards him.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

when I ride a bike I am very careful about cars. Head-on means the cyclist may not be paying attention as he was maybe stressed out about his exam.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Outside of major cities, there are not many flat leveled sidewalks or bicycle only lanes.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The boy was on the same side of the road going against traffic to e hit head on?

The article says that there were no sidewalks, so the impression I got was that it was one of those thin single-lane roads in which pedestrians and cyclists keep to the left but cars go straight down the middle and forget that things smaller than a car can come straight at them.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

@DNALeri - No info about whether the boy was wearing a helmet... Most likely, not.

The law is up to 13 year olds must wear a helmet. Not that anybody would notice.

@Goodlucktoyou - when I ride a bike I am very careful about cars. Head-on means the cyclist may not be paying attention as he was maybe stressed out about his exam.

It clearly states it was a narrow road with no sidewalks. If the driver was not paying attention, the kid had nowhere to go.

Yeah, some kids can be real pests on the roads on their bicycles, but they are kids on bicycles. That's what kids do! Drivers need to stop bullying kids onj bicycles and respect that they are just stupid kids.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Honestly asking: if a person is riding a bike and using their cellphone, has headphones in both ears, and/or holding an umbrella (all illegal in Japan), and a car hits them, is the driver still charged with the same severity of crime?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

@ThonTaddeo, your comment makes the most sense to me, relative to my experience on far too many very narrow roads and streets in Japan, both urban and rural. Too many of them are nothing more than paved paths.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The Kid is dead, he can't answer back and defend his actions. All we know is what we're being told here within this article - that he was riding his bicycle down the side of a road - which, at face value - seems a perfectly normal/safe thing to do on "some" roads. And that, the Police say, they have a "suspicion", of Reckless driving, on the behalf of the driver of the Car involved.

Imagine yourself as being one of the Parents of that Kid, reading the comments here.... hopefully I will never be in that situation, as too, I hope neither will you. Please be considerate when commenting.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I cycle and drive a car and am relieved that I don't have to do either in a build-up area in Japan where the roads are narrow, there are no sidewalks, and there are 90 degree crossroads everywhere. Throw busy people of all ages into the mix and its a recipe for accidents.

RIP to the boy.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

It's very sad to hear of bicycle and pedestrian accidents . . . . It's important to have bicycle lanes on roadways, as well as side walks for pedestrians. Bicycle riders need to wear helmets and reflectorized clothing, pedestrians also need to be warned to wear reflectorized clothing while traveling when it is dark.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I absolutely hate cyclists who travel on the wrong side of the road. They create highly dangerous situations for all involved: pedestrians, cyclists in the correct lane and cars who may have to swerve into traffic and into the opposite lane, endangering vehicles there as well.

i have sometimes shouted a loud "kora!!" right in their faces as they go (inches) past me. Selfish and lazy.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Higuchi was quoted by police as saying he wasn't paying close attention to what was in front of him.

Yeah. Here in Japan, they call that, ‘Driving.’

It’s hard to say where the fault lies from this article. Driver, cops or roads.

RIP

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@stepoutsidethebox - Honestly asking: if a person is riding a bike and using their cellphone, has headphones in both ears, and/or holding an umbrella (all illegal in Japan), 

Actually, you are nearly correct. They tried to make holding an umbrella illegal, but the proposal was squashed due to protests by mothers groups.

And, the answer to your questions is, YES! The driver is ultimately responsible regardless of the circumstances. A vehicle driver has a responsibility to drive in a manner that can compensate for these dangerous fools. It's called, 'sharing' the roads.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Disillusioned

They tried to make holding an umbrella illegal, but the proposal was squashed due to protests by mothers groups.

I'm not saying you're wrong, but you've said this before and I have been unable to find any evidence of it. Could you provide some? I'm an avid cyclist and am very interested in the topic of cycle safety.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The law in Japan stupidly allows bicycles to move against the flow of traffic.Nothing will bring the boy back but the law should be changed.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yeah. Here in Japan, they call that, ‘Driving.’

There are idiots in Japan as there are in every country.

As an avid long distance as well as commuter cyclist I always note reports of cycling accidents and there is no shortage of them in the British, American, and Australian newspapers that I regularly read.

I have cycling experience in the US, Japan, Britain, France, and Holland. I have driving experience in the US, Japan, Britain, France, and Cyprus.

As a cyclist, I would rate Japan near the top in terms of safety where you have to mix it up with cars. Holland is, of course, much better because of its extensive system of cycling paths.

I have repeatedly had young punks try to run me off the road in the UK. I have never experienced that in Japan. I cycle anywhere and everywhere in Tokyo. I would never think of cycling in London. Driving is bad enough.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

"Keep Left"

According to this there is a 20,000 yen fine or 30 days in prison for riding on the wrong side of the road or against the flow of traffic. (On another site it said that holding an open umbrella when it is raining is also against the law.)

http://japaninfoswap.com/bicycle-japan-know-the-laws/

0 ( +0 / -0 )

bullfighter

Long post for a small point.

So what? My experience is different. I've ridden and driven in almost as many countries, and Japan has been the worst.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There was no sidewalk and the boy was riding his bike along the side of the road 

In all likelihood, the road had at best a 30 km/h limit, so I'd say speed was involved as well.

Knowing young cyclists, it's possible neither individual was paying adequate attention. Unfortunately, the cyclist always loses.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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