crime

2 men arrested over alleged plot to cheat on Japanese university exam

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The case may be the tip of the iceberg as have already been warned of. The crime seems to be well-organized.

China, the country of origin for the suspects, has imposed harsher penalties on exam cheaters: A max 7 year prison charge. Those who are found guilty are barred from taking exams for three years. They are also likely to be "blacklisted" nearly for good affecting employment and education.

中国・高考カンニングで7年の実刑に 若者たちの心を確実にむしばむ勉強地獄 

https://www.sankeibiz.jp/macro/news/190523/mcb1905230500004-n1.htm#:~:text=%E6%94%BF%E5%BA%9C%E3%81%AF%E4%B8%8D%E6%AD%A3%E8%A1%8C%E7%82%BA%E3%81%AB,%E5%AE%9F%E5%88%91%E3%81%A8%E5%AE%9A%E3%82%81%E3%82%89%E3%82%8C%E3%81%9F%E3%80%82

0 ( +2 / -2 )

How about scrapping the existing JHS, HS and University curricula and design a curriculum that teaches skills that people can actually USE in life? Then they would WANT to learn and wouldn't feel the need to cheat.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

It's a global thing. I saw a program on Harvard some years back where over 80% of ex students said they cheated in exams and that it was common practice

3 ( +4 / -1 )

How about scrapping the existing JHS, HS and University curricula and design a curriculum that teaches skills that people can actually USE in life? Then they would WANT to learn and wouldn't feel the need to cheat.

I partly agree. In real life, it's more relevant or even encouraged to solve problems by retrieving assistance from others via social networks or simply from Google-sensei. Collaboration also can detect and avoid errors often made in solo work. The current arrangements seem outdated, unlikely to test such problem-solving strategies.

On the other hand, I see many public exams as a socialization process where societal members should beware and follow the rule of law (or say rule of game).

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Maybe the issue aren’t these “cheaters.”

Maybe the whole testing system is the problem.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Very common problem. You don't have to look too far.

Just go and check JLPT exam that takes place every six months and you will see how many people are cheating.

Then we have those geniuses with N1 that can't even introduce themselves.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I wonder how many other people were doing the same with better luck/technique and went undiscovered. Technology makes this kind of cheating easy to do and difficult to discover. Are universities going to conduct examinations on Faraday cages?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I was gonna say it's a excessive to arrest and even search their houses for just cheating at an exam. But

Wang allegedly enlisted Li, his former tutor, to assist in the plot in exchange for compensation.

Money's involved and this could be considered as fraud.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@ BernieWooster

Exactly the point. Some of the current curriculum is completely irrelevant. The system is content to produce robots who can memorise but are devoid of social skills.

Someone once said "a child's education begins the moment they leave school."

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I cheated as a kid, but I didn’t realize it was an arrest problem. I thought it was a cat and mouse game against my teachers. Opps.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Not sure about Japan, but if you are caught cheating in the "big" exams in the U.K. they will nullify your results in all the exams you have taken up to that point, and furthermore you will be disqualified from sitting any further exams whatsoever.

Basically, you are toast.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There a law that forbid cheating at exams in Japan?

When a was a university student, I saw a lot of students caught by teacher but they just received 0% and that's all.. Nobody was arrested...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

When a was a university student, I saw a lot of students caught by teacher but they just received 0% and that's all.. Nobody was arrested...

The difference here dkm, is that this was an entrance exam.

alleged case of cheating on a Hitotsubashi University entrance exam,

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Small wireless earphones and a smartphone were confiscated during a search of Wang's home, investigators said, and an analysis of his call records and other data is under way.

That's overreach for "cheating" in an exam. Disqualify the guy, and move on. Japanese police really have no sense of scale - big or small crime - their reaction is the same.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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