crime

Chinese woman arrested for drowning 5-year-old son

13 Comments

Police in Chiba have arrested a 46-year-old Chinese woman on suspicion of murdering her 5-year-old son at their residence.

According to police, the suspect, Yuqiong Cai, 46, drowned her youngest son Shunko, aged 5, in the bath at around 7 p.m. on Tuesday. Fuji TV reported that the when the woman's husband returned home from work at around 8:15 p.m., he found Shunko unconscious and called 119. Shunko was taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Cai lived with her husband and two sons, the oldest of whom is 17. Police said she came to Japan last fall due to her husband’s work.

Cai was quoted by police as saying that Shunko was blind and she was depressed thinking of his future. However, Shunko was not blind and there was no health issue with him at all. Neither of the sons attended school and Cai was not close to any of the neighbors, local residents said.

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13 Comments
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Is race or nationality really relevant? As if Japanese people never kill their own children for stupid reasons....just saying

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

Nationality is just normal information like any news story reports just like the area where it took place, the gender and age of the people etc. Why does this upset people?

8 ( +10 / -2 )

RIP Shunko. You didn't deserve this. Not your fault, little guy.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Cai was quoted by police as saying that Shunko was blind and she was depressed thinking of his future. However, Shunko was not blind and there was no health issue with him at all.

Are we sure the mother isn't Japanese?

1 ( +5 / -4 )

She should be more depressed about the older sons not attending school than the one with a long future ahead.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Shunko is not the proper romanization (pinyin) of any Chinese word. Well, Shun is, but I don't know of any Chinese word romanized as ko.

Which leads me to wonder, while the family may be ethnic Chinese, they may not be from China.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Suppose there is no reason to be offended at the article stating that the woman is Chinese or not, but it does sometimes come off as unnecessary when certain details have attention drawn to them.

Not even details that are related to race. Sometimes it is a crime or incident and the persons charged will have their company name announced. Is it necessary the article go over the company they work for? Was this a company order? No? So why mention it? Give the name, what happened, where it happened and any other confirmed information.

Sometimes things like race or occupation do not have any reason to be brought up.

Then there are incidents involving Japanese folks too, yet attention to the person being Japanese is never brought up. Should we just assume that the person is Japanese by the name? What about Yuqiong Cai? Sounds Chinese, should we assume she is? Why bring it up in the article?

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Why are some arguing over mentioning race or nationality?

Nations all over the world do so when reporting any such incidents. Any incidents of crime involving foreign nationals mention the origin of country. Nothing wrong with that.

RIP to the poor girl.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Well in the other article today, the ones raping and pillaging in Germany were race/country classified, so why not this? But, if they said they were Americans, things would have been different.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Just to be fair then, articles pertaining Japanese nationals should state they are in fact Japanese then.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Just to be fair then, articles pertaining Japanese nationals should state they are in fact Japanese then.

That's the default, since it's news about Japan. If they don't state the nationality, the person is Japanese.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

If they don't state the nationality, the person is Japanese.

or Korean permanent residents.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Look I know arguing over the idea of race or occupation being mentioned in articles is a moot point for some. I just want to make the point that mentioning such things, particularly in Japan carries a lot more weight than it may in others.

Company employee found guilty of something? Your company now looks bad. Friend of yours is found carrying illegal substances? Guess who else is getting questioned?

Almost anything that might be frowned upon in Japanese society carries over for huge groups of people even if the act committed is done by a single individual.

Because of that I would appreciate news stories treading a bit more carefully about what is said. Of course there are points that need to be mentioned when detailing suspects and that like, but we need to ask is needed here? Yes or no?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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