crime

Dangerous cycling in Tokyo set to incur fines

50 Comments

The Tokyo District Public Prosecutor's Office announced Tuesday that cyclists who continually run red lights and commit other dangerous traffic offenses will be fined.

According to a Sankei Shimbun report, the Prosecutor's Office said that although the law allowed for on-the-spot fines to be imposed for dangerous cycling, Tokyo residents had until now largely escaped punishment. However, a spokesperson said that system is set to change, due to an increase in reports of dangerous riding on the capital's streets.

Riders who are caught riding dangerously or running red lights more than twice run the risk of a fine of up to 50,000 yen. Tokyo will be the first city in Japan to introduce fines for dangerous cycling.

© Japan Today

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50 Comments
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It`s about time. I am a keen cyclist. I cycle 10km to work every day. I follow the same rules as motorist...I am also a car driver. Why some cyclist think that they are immune from the law escapes me...particularly riding into oncoming traffic. Not just Tokyo but the whole country needs to crack down on these offenders.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

YESSSS! Its a start. Now also include maniac car drivers and implement it nationwide and it should get a little better. I hope

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Hopefully, they start wising up and catching not only dangerous cyclists, but dangerous motorists... I have never once seen anyone get pulled over by the cops in Tokyo.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Nothing will happen, and things will stay the same. Just like everything in Japan.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

I'm also a cyclist and drive a car and motorcycle. When a cyclist is hit by a car, in most cases the drive is fully liable for the accident. Hope the new law also includes cyclist running red lights and running into traffic to be fully liable.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Wondering how they will fine? Using the registered number when you buy the bike?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If only the car vehicle drivers were given the same warning and action taken then there may be some change but the systemic problem is the lack of enforcement by a lame force. On the other hand if your Japanese its great to get away with murder with a bow and a I'm very sorry.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I see cars driving through red lights every day. None of them are fined. Fit the traffic lights with cameras and impose a Y100000 fine per offence. Some of the lights around here could pull in millions of Yen per hour at that rate.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Its a good start..but you know what they will focus on - the tiny streets with unnecessary red lights...not the major ones.

anyhow, I hope they start cracking on those wrong side of street mamachari with phones in their hand... those are menace to everyone

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Saw one going middle of the road, wrong side( busy road mind you) with a phone...about 50Year old lady. Stopped and told her its dangerous, she snarled something at me...and rode away with the phone on her ear ffs...

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Going through red lights. Good one! Take a look at all the cars. Traffic laws here are a joke.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

We could use some of that where I live. A week does not go by without my being nearly mown by some stupid bicycle rider with a blank face and earphones who is weaving through the crowd like Lance Armstrong with a blood transfusion.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Will there be any punishment for the first offence? If not, it seems unlikely anyone will be knowingly caught more than twice.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Can't wait to see the first bicycle chase by police.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

the tiny streets with unnecessary red lights

Paradoxically, these are the most dangerous spots, with no visibility and no way to drive around incoming cyclists. So yeah, focus there first.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Of course the new crackdown will only apply to young cyclists going fast or running red lights. What about all those old bags and old farts on mama-charis, crawling along the sidewalk, handlebars bent back in a manner that hinders steering, wobbling all over the place and unable to stop without dismounting altogether. I'd wager they cause more accidents than everyone else combined.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Im sorry but ... what?

When the police in this country are actually implimenting the "dangerous driving" rules for Cars, Taxis, Trucks and Motorbikes which are supposed to be in place, I will take this seriously.

Everyday I see (to name a few) car drivers texting, watching TV while driving, running red lights, making illegal turns, sitting with infant babies or children on their laps, or jumping around the car like renegades, and all the time never wearing a seatbelt. I have seen mild hit and runs, and cases of bikes and motorbikes being literally pushed off the road because Taro was checking a mail and wasn't looking where he was going. Last week, I watched as a salaryman hit a woman on her mamacharie with toddler, because he was too busy lighting a fag. Every week we read in the news about how a pedestrian was hit by a lorry / van / car who "didn't realize I hit someone" .. or drivers who are old and have vision problems, or drivers who are young and dont have licenses yet.

And yet, you want to turn your attention on cyclists? Cyclists who are, for the most part, asked to ride around cities with no bike lanes, getting harassed by taxis and beeped by trucks, just for being on the road in the first place?!

I understand that breaking the law is breaking the law and should be punished, however priorities people? A cyclist running a red light is bad, but incredibly minor compared to a driver not looking at the road and endangering the lives of many because of his lack of attention. A bike is very unlikely to do much damage (except to the rider himself) but a car could be used as a weapon. I hope the police will start this safety campaign by enforcing the rules of the road which are already in place, and being hopelessly and unashamedly ignored.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

How about a class which actually teaches the rules of the road to people who ride bikes. It feels like half the people riding bikes ride against traffic! Are people here not aware of road rules? Is there no common sense? I dont think there is, but I am not worried about cyclists as much as I am drivers texting, watching tv, not stopping at stop signs and rushing to pull out in front of you so they don't have to wait for two more cars, and, sorry to say this, but the elderly drivers who, many of which, have NO BUSINESS driving - beyond reckless. It's putting a bandaid on a broken arm, they're not dealing with the real problem.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

About time, too.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

That's what this country needs, more rules!

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Yeah, that's right! Pick on the cyclists! Meanwhile, you can stand at any intersection and watch four or five cars go through every red light at any time of day. You can also watch the roll through stop signs and totally ignore pedestrian crossings. Surely, an education campaign would be sufficient for the cyclists and get the fat butts of the j-flops onto the streets dishing out tickets for dangerous vehicular driving!

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Can't wait to see the first bicycle chase by police.

Been there, done that,

How about they focus on cars first esp' at red lights.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Japan can come up with any law they can. BUT...Do they enforce it? Nope. Only during Safety Week. Or when cops need to reach their "norma".

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@ Ms. Alexander: Exactly, which frustrates the heck out of me. I'm a cyclist, and driver and the cyclists have been driving me crazy for the last 6 months or so. Cyclists in the wrong lane, against traffic is so common these days. It's not safe to drive anymore...unless they change the laws at whose at fault.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I don't think cops here know how to enforce things. Kids not in carseats/boosters or strapped in is a fine example. Kids not wearing their helmets when on a bicycle is another. Bozos getting away with their stupidity is the finest example!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I am not sure I understand what rules are in Japan. Its like, (very late mind you) Dangerous driving is now Policed??? DUH! Is that not Logic? Do you need to know this? So if its a new rule, why isn't it a rule to wear a helmet as well?? Or how about more 'people friendly footpaths'?? How about TVs in car? Can you really drive sanely while watching TV? Babies and Children in Front Seats?? Remove the Cause of the Danger first should be the issue, not going around getting ridiculous amounts of money for an 'Undefined Law' of dangerous Bicycle driving. Have some consistency Japan, enforce important rules but make it clearer.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Been hit three times by wayward women on bicycles here in Tokyo. Not one of 'em apologized. Got what I suspect will be a lifetime limp from a direct hit about 10 years ago. Hopefully the police will be able to stop some of this nonsense that we get from uncaring cyclists. But doubt it ... as I see do-nothing cops merely watch wicked cyclists do whatever they wish on the open road and on pavements.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I drive and cycle to work here in Tokyo everyday and yes, many drivers break laws (speeding, run red lights, make illegal turns, texting, change lanes illegally etc) and you take a chance doing that. If you are caught - and I know alot of ppl who have been - you get hit with fines and points. Shld be the same for cyclists. You shouldn't be running red lights, riding your bike into oncoming traffic on a one way road with an umbrella in one hand or listening to music with noise cancelling headphones - if you get caught you shld be fined. We have all probably done something illegal in our car or on a bicycle at some time in our lives and not all of us get caught. Frequency will raise the odds of you getting caught. This logic applies in any country but saying that, I do sympathize that cyclists are in limbo here as they are treated as cars, nor pedestrians. No bike lanes combined with crowded, narrow and sometimes non-existent sidewalks is going to make this very difficult to enforce and apply fairly.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

No, police don't enforce anything. I used to be a safe (car) driver for the last 10 years, but seeing what drivers get away with on the roads, I've all but given up and have followed the flock, unfortunately. When I've witnessed police cars run red lights, I've given up all hope. Sometimes I feel like going up to an officer on the corner of a street and slap him/her across the head to see if he/she is awake, as I witness more infractions in 45 sec.-1 min. at a red light than he/she could in a red light (district) in Thailand. As for this new law...I'm upset, but it's no different than cyclists riding with umbrellas; can't be and won't be enforced. Safe driving and riding everyone.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Having lived in New York, New Jersey, Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Illinois, California, Tokyo, Yokohama, Nagoya and Okinawa. My experience has shown me that few people who ride bikes follow the rules/laws.

Japan has had it's styles of riding bikes for a long time, umbrellas used, people sitting on handle bars and standing on rear wheel spokes etc...You learn to live and adjust to your surrounding as with most things.

Reading about, seeing and talking with foreigners living in Japan has always included the thinking that Japan should do this or do that. To somehow conform to western society, bike riding, smoking, entrance to Japanese only establishments and the list goes on.

When an old Japanese woman is riding her bike and I m in her path somehow, I have come to know that the best thing to do is be cautious and tolerant. Just what I have done living in any other place. I m not expecting the old woman to change because I moved there. Hey, but that's my opinion.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The Tokyo District Public Prosecutor’s Office announced Tuesday that cyclists who continually run red lights and commit other dangerous traffic offenses will be fined.

Continually?! There's your key that nothing will be done. Much like how driver her don't get tickets for red lights, speeding, kids without seatbelts...

I'm all for this but money directed to the wrong area. Deal with the drivers of automobiles first!

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Is riding against the flow of traffic considered "Dangerous"? What about not having front lights or rear reflectors at night?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The biggest threat of them all... grannies obliviously speeding around corners on their mama-charis. Oh well excuse me then!

Nothing worse!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Is riding against the flow of traffic considered "Dangerous"?

That's a big "10-4", Big Ben... well... more dangerous than the alternative.

You're supposed to WALK on the side of the road against the flow of traffic. This gives you the opportunity to see someone ahead of you who's too close to the side of the road and at least give you the CHANCE to avoid being hit by their side-view mirror.

You RIDE on the side of the road going WITH the flow of traffic due to something called physics: A bicycle/scooter traveling 20kph is hit by a car traveling 40kph. If the bicycle/scooter is traveling in the same direction as the car, the resulting impact is only the equivilent of a 20 kph collision. If the bicycle/scooter is traveling in the opposite direction of the car, however, the resulting impact is the equivilent of a 60 kph collision. That's much more likely to be fatal for a bicycle/scooter operator due to the amount of blunt force trauma a 60 kph collision imparts.

The reason they don't recommend the same for walking is that the ability to see the danger up ahead out-weighs the minimal increase in collision speed when walking.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Many people on bikes are just idiots, yesterday in traffic, me in my car slowing moving in HEAVY traffic then I have to slam on my brakes because some stupid Japanese?? Not sure on the nationality, Asian, anway, this idiot bastard thought it would be ok to go from one side of a MAJOR street to the other BETWEEN moving cars, he was lucky I did not him! I tink I would have helped stick his bike right up his ass! Not young, some idiot about 40 or 50 years old so I say Tokyo Police catch these dorks! Make Tokyo a safe city again, then do it for ALL OF JAPAN too! Then go after these idiot looser bosozoku motorcycle dorks too!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Nobody will be fined for this. My local city introduced the 2000 yen no smoking fine several years ago. A city employee told me it has been collected 4 times in 3 years, all in the first week. The appearance of doing something is the main concern of lawmaking in Japan, it's a PR exercise and nothing more.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

as a former professional cyclist i couldn't agree more about the need to get novice riders off fixies without brakes and force them to start riding within their limits and follow rules, but at the same time i find it absolutely unacceptable that tokyo has no bike lanes and cannot seem to agree on where cyclist should ride. while i may feel comfortable riding in traffic, i certainly would not like to see the average citizen forced to ride in traffic so exposed and unprotected. i would love to see a crackdown on unsafe driving by motorists and bus drivers in particular as well.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

As far as I know bicycles are meant to ride on the road. We all know however that they are allowed on the pavement in Japan.

This means that when facing red lights at 1) T junctions with roads coming in from the right (just mount the pavement) 2) When one wants to turn left (just mount the pavement) 3) When one wants to turn right (just cross in front of the waiting cars as a pedestrian) one can treat oneself as a pedestrian and run the light.

The dual nature of bicycles - road transport/pedestrian transport means that red lights are often ambivalent.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Yeah why do people ride on sidewalks here?! Why? Is it a good idea? No. Is it safer? For old people who can't keep their balance, maybe, but they have no business being on a bike in the first place. As many of you have mentioned already, we know what will happen: new "tough stance" on reckless riding means, in reality, not much will happen. Have you seen bike cops here? Old, heavy steel mamachari that nobody seams to handle. Can't even imagine how they would chase anybody down with one of those things. I know some other countries (France, USA) have real bike police on mountain bikes. They have actual training on how to ride. Maybe that would be a good way to start? You know, cops actually trained for what they are supposed to promote.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yeah why do people ride on sidewalks here?! Why? Is it a good idea? No. Is it safer? For old people who can't keep their balance, maybe, but they have no business being on a bike in the first place. As many of you have mentioned already, we know what will happen: new "tough stance" on reckless riding means, in reality, not much will happen. Have you seen bike cops here? Old, heavy steel mamachari that nobody seams to handle. Can't even imagine how they would chase anybody down with one of those things. I know some other countries (France, USA) have real bike police on mountain bikes. They have actual training on how to ride. Maybe that would be a good way to start? You know, cops actually trained for what they are supposed to promote...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Good idea but will not be properly executed. Cyclists are a menace, both in the road as well as on the pavement.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Yeah why do people ride on sidewalks here?! Why?

Bearing in mind that Japanese roads are narrow, and there are a lot of cars, as miwiya says "i certainly would not like to see the average citizen forced to ride in traffic"

In the US, one can keep bikes off the sidewalks/pavements because the roads are sufficiently wide.

They manage keeping bikes off the pavement in Holland by making extensive use of bike lanes. I think that the problem with having more bike lanes in Japan is that the roads for cars are clogged up, and many of the cars on the roads are coming from further afield than they are in Holland. Japan is both densely populated (like Holland) and extended (long, thin and mountainous). This means that some people are often forced to use cars. Holland is heavily populated but not mountainous, and thus not extended. People in Holland, more than Japan, can use bikes to get to where they are going.

Cyclists are a menace, both in the road as well as on the pavement.

What?? Cars are a menace too. Cars are more of a menace because they are bigger, harder, more massive, and faster moving. Despite their being faster on the road, due to their size and parking requirements they do not necessarily get to their destination sooner. When cars have the same number of occupants (i.e. one occupant) cars are far and away more menacing per passenger mile than bicycles.

Car drivers appear often to have a "the roads are ours" mindset that sees cyclists as the menace.

Cars are fine (or at least a necessary evil) when cycling is not an alternative, i.e. for instance 1) Cars have a certain number of passengers (how many cyclists are more dangerous than one car?) and or 2) Cars are coming from a difficult to cycle distance, and or 3) The cars occupant is carrying essential gear to heavy or bulk to cycle with 4) Climatic reasons, the need humans to sweat, and lack of showers requires that one travels by air conditioned vehicle.

But often there are in my view, it is often the case that car drivers are getting fat and unhealthy, on their own in their big motorised box, with the assumption that roads are for cars. In these cases, cars are the menace.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I drive or walk but definitely don't ride a bike in Tokyo simply because of the amount of injuries I hear about from bicyclists being clipped by cars/trucks. Will someone who rides a bike regularly please explain why people ride against the flow of traffic? Not only is this unsafe to the cyclist but also puts the oncoming driver in danger of hitting another car in the next lane while trying to avoid hitting the cyclist. Please explain the rationale?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The Tokyo District Public Prosecutor’s Office announced Tuesday . . . etc

They probably thought it was about time to say something about the ever escalating madness in traffic in this country. But don't expect anything to change in the foreseeable future. Pet projects here are airports, railways, bridges, expressways, huge shopping arcades, stadiums. Construction of anything you can think of cementing the bonds between politics and construction business, except building cycle lanes and safer urban roads. There is no political will or incentive and the citizens are mum or indifferent as well.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I never ride in the street. Only the expensive racing bikes ride in the street in this country town. Everyone rides on the sidewalks here. Also, I drink while riding, and use an umbrella when it's raining.

I'm always amazed at how many people on JT overreact and whine about cycling manners.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

For those suggesting that because cars are potentially more dangerous than bicycles so police shouldn't bother cracking down on them, what vacuum are you living in? Yes, realistically, cars have much greater potential to cause damage than bicycles but that 1) doesn't mean that other vehicles on the road should not bear responsibility for disobeying the laws and 2) bicycles are dangerous as well (see stats below). You don't not arrest robbers because murderers are more dangerous. They're both breaking the law!

Cyclists breaking the law have a much greater potential to cause accidents than those obeying it so why shouldn't they be punished? If you're driving a car and have to slam the breaks on because a bicyclist tears throw a red light, you run a serious risk of being hit by the car behind you or skidding into the other lane. By law bicycles in Japan are considered "light vehicles" and as such should definitely be subject to punishment if they are caught breaking the law.

If you live in the countryside you might not realize how irritating, stressful and dangerous the sidewalks in Japan can be, particularly in certain neighborhoods. I don't care if you think the roads are too dangerous for cyclists or not. There is simply no excuse for anyone on a bike to be tearing down a sidewalk with people on it.

As for whether or not the roads or sidewalks are safer for cyclists, from personal experience I always found the roads to be safer. Yes, that requires paying attention, obeying the rules and being aware of the fact that not all drivers are looking out for you. In fact, I always thought it was best to ride with the attitude that everyone was actively trying to hit me. In over 20 years of cycling on Tokyo roads, I never had an accident. That's not to say I never had any close calls but riding safely goes a long way towards keeping you safe.

In addition, multiple studies from Thunder Bay, to Ontario to Seattle show that it's more dangerous to cycle on the sidewalk than the road. Sidewalks are obstacle course with pedestrians having far less to lose by being unpredictable than drivers on roads. Drivers have a harder time seeing cyclists on sidewalks and again, most studies show that car/bicycle accidents occur when the cyclist was riding on the sidewalk.

Yes, the roads in Tokyo are crowded. Yes, riding on the roads can be overwhelming at first. Yes, drivers in Tokyo lack awareness of how to share the roads. But .... one of the major reason that people feel the roads are dangerous is because they lack safe cycling knowledge or simply chose not to follow the laws. The more cyclists riding - safely and legally - on the roads and demanding that cars safely share those roads with them, the safer the roads will be for cyclists and drivers and the safer and less stressful the sidewalks will be for pedestrians, the very people the sidewalks are intended for in the first place.

All that said, I fully expect nothing to change.

http://onelesscar.wordpress.com/2008/06/11/risks-of-sidewalk-versus-road-bicycling/

*National Police Agency data on traffic accidents shows that about 20 percent of accidents in the past decade, a high proportion, involved bicycles. Reported collisions between bicycles and pedestrians totaled about 2,900 in 2009 and 2,800 in 2010, a huge increase over about 1,800 a decade before. According to National Police Agency, there were 174,000 bicycle accidents in 2004, 1.2 times the figure in 1996, and there were 2,767 bicycle accidents involving pedestrians, 4.8 times the 1996 figure. Of the 745 people who died while riding bicycles, 67.2 percent of the deaths were caused by head injuries.

In September 2011, an 84-year-old woman died after being hit from behind by a bicycle when she was walking on the sidewalk of a national highway in Yatsushiro, Kumamoto Prefecture. Six pedestrians were killed by bicycles in 2003, including a 38-year-old mother of four who suffered head injuries after being struck as she crossed the street in a crosswalk by a bicycle ridden ta break-neck speed downhill by 31-year-old man who could squeeze the brakes because he was holding a soft drink. The victim fell into a coma and died two days later. Many bicycle accidents involving pedestrians have been blamed on middle and high school students.

*

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

It`s about time. I am a keen cyclist. I cycle 10km to work every day. I follow the same rules as motorist...I am also a car driver. Why some cyclist think that they are immune from the law escapes me...particularly riding into oncoming traffic. Not just Tokyo but the whole country needs to crack down on these offenders.

If this was the only traffic problem Japan had, I would whole-heartedly agree with you, but there's about 20 other much much more serious and dangerous road / traffic related violators that operate MOTOR vehicles that can KILL people, that need to be dealt with, if not merely enforcing the laws on the books. Then after that's taken care of, Fine, divert police resources to go after bicycle riders...

This is one of the biggest NO Brain required areas, You go after the dangerous motor vehicle drivers First, then worry about what kenji-chan and koji-kun are doing with their bicycles...

I can't tell you how many times I watched motor-cycles ride 100 MPH down a two lane road, with the JCops standing right in front of their Koban, completely oblivious to their surroundings, only by the grace of god, no one was killed...

Going after bicyclist, sure but you've got about 20 other more pressing MOTOR Vehicle violators to go before you get there...

Laws written by kids, for kids... If this country had half an ounce of common-sense it would be a nice place to live.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@timtak

Spot on!!

Car drivers appear often to have a "the roads are ours" mindset that sees cyclists as the menace.

This is absolutely the mindset, not only Car Drivers, but Motorcycle, Bus, Truck, Van... Motorized scouter...

They have this "I own the road" mindset... I've been walking along the side of the road and had 20,000Lbs Buses brush the hair on the back of my neck as they roared past me... Unbelievable... This is how people get killed...

And I had I been able to catch the bus at an intersection, I would have hauled the driver out...

A MOTOR Vehicle is a DEADLY WEAPON! PERIOD! That's the same as pointing a gun at someone, No Different! You will go to jail! Grow Up!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

For those suggesting that because cars are potentially more dangerous than bicycles so police shouldn't bother cracking down on them, what vacuum are you living in? Yes, realistically, cars have much greater potential to cause damage than bicycles but that 1) doesn't mean that other vehicles on the road should not bear responsibility for disobeying the laws and 2) bicycles are dangerous as well (see stats below). You don't not arrest robbers because murderers are more dangerous. They're both breaking the law!

And for those suggesting that operating a Bicycle Be Treated Exactly Like Operating a motor Vehicle! What COMMON-SENSE VOID ARE YOU LIVING IN...?

Ok, well, we better just take that tricycle away from our 3 year old, and tell them, they have to first be licensed an wait until they are 18 years old to ride a bike...

Ridiculous thinking, void of any common-sense...

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The dual nature of bicycles - road transport/pedestrian transport means that red lights are often ambivalent.

Very good point, this is probably where some of the natives get confused...

A bicycle by the legal definition is a Pedestrian, NOT a motor vehicle. Therefor many of the things, a bicycle can do Legally, a motor vehicles cannot do legally. There tends to be this simplistic mentality prevalent in Japan, where there is this belief that everything is equal and everything is the same,

Example: Motor vehicles are NOT allowed on the sidewalk (because sidewalks are meant for pedestrians) so many of our natives here extrapolate this into meaning, pedestrians are NOT allowed on the street, which for obvious common-sense and safety reasons, people don't walk in the street, but there are occasions when a pedestrian needs to walk in the street, and by law, when a pedestrians walks in the street, they are suppose to be walking against traffic (so you can physically make eye contact and see the vehicles coming) Motor vehicles are NEVER allowed to be on the sidewalk... Period...

This is where this simplistic mentality kicks in and the motor vehicle operators think they can apply the "everyone is equal" / Communist mentality.... Sorry it doesn't work that way!

Just like your algebra teacher said, you cannot compare apples and oranges... Motor vehicles are NOT pedestrians and Motor vehicles must always give the right away to pedestrians (for obvious safety reasons and common-sense!)

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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