crime

Death-row inmate hanged for 2007 murder

25 Comments

A man convicted of murdering a woman in 2007 in Nagoya was executed on Thursday morning, Justice Minister Yoko Kamikawa said.

It was the first execution that Kamikawa has signed off on since becoming justice minister and the 12th since Prime Minister Shinzo Abe took office in December 2012.

Tsukasa Kanda, 44, was convicted along with accomplices Yoshimoto Hori and Yuichiro Hondo of killing 31-year-old Rie Isogai on Aug 24, 2007, in Aichi Prefecture. The men, who met on a website set up to bring "crime-minded" people together, were convicted of abducting Isogai with the intention of robbing her. They then killed her to prevent her from testifying against them.

Kanda and Hori were sentenced to death. Kawagishi received a life prison term in return for having turned himself in and providing evidence that aided the police investigation. Hori's death sentence was commuted to life in prison, following an appeal.

The case took an unusual turn when Isogai's mother drew up a petition for the death penalty for Hori, that was signed by 100,000 citizens within 10 days. She presented the petition with some 150,000 names to the District Public Prosecutor's Office of Nagoya. The number increased to 318,000 by December 2008. However, the Supreme Court rejected the request.

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25 Comments
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First execution under Abe's leadership (?!)

-14 ( +0 / -14 )

The 12th

0 ( +0 / -0 )

'... were convicted of abducting Isogai with the intention of robbing her. They then killed her to prevent her from testifying against them. '

Wasting a human life for a little bit of money.

Well deserved.

9 ( +15 / -6 )

I make the total 13 or 14th depending on source.

Moderator: It's 12, as we said earlier.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

absolutely delighted to hear the news. this should happen to all premeditated murders such as this. if only the West had the "you know what" to do the same... well some US states do... anyhow, great job Japan!!

3 ( +11 / -8 )

Good riddance. "Criminals thrive on the indulgence of society's 'understanding'".

2 ( +10 / -8 )

Taking a human life really underscores the sanctity of human life.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Not usual for the death sentence for a single murder.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

I remember the case. Pure evil. Good riddance to that scum. And why not the other one also? The one who turned himself in, OK let him live.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Wahou! You turn yourself in, showing guilt and recognition of doing wrong in your poor life, and all you is life punishment... no wonder why no car running over a person doesn't stop. Anyway, I am learning lessons here in Japanwhich convinces me day after day not to believe in something called justice here. People are so nice but system is so brutal. Also it is very unusual to take several lives for a single. I am pro death penalty but against going over an already harsh principle of an eye for an eye. There is always a leader in such horrible event. That one pays. Dura lex, sed lex.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Here is an account of the murder, accuracy unknown, but it's chilling. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWEt6ZHYg5E

2 ( +2 / -0 )

To bad not enough countries has made the death penalty automatic when it is used to cover up a felony. It is good when one criminal who disregard life are actually punished for his actions and not become a government dependent even in prison.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Yet the leader of the Aum cult, Shoko Asahara, continues to live in prison. I'm 100% convinced the Japanese government is afraid to execute him. They are afraid of the consequences that would follow.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Pretty sad seeing such support for an archaic practice employed by a country, that everyone posting here should know, is highly flawed and inaccurate on it's best day.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

It beats me. I really don't know how anyone could kill another person in cold blood. It's a pity this scumbag couldn't be made to suffer more before he died.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

absolutely delighted to hear the news. this should happen to all premeditated murders such as this. if only the West had the "you know what" to do the same... well some US states do... anyhow, great job Japan!!

But you'll be the first to say the whole thing is rotten if you are falsely convicted and sentenced to die as many others were? Or maybe you'll feel that you are just part of a necessary statistic...that you must die in order to keep the system going?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Yet the leader of the Aum cult, Shoko Asahara, continues to live in prison. I'm 100% convinced the Japanese government is afraid to execute him. They are afraid of the consequences that would follow.

That Sarin gas attack shocked the international community back in '95. I've always wondered why they didn't hang Asahara too-

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hope that all people with life setence gets death penalty

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Curious if any of you "hang 'em all" camp members are educated at all about what I can only assume is your home. Anyone read anything or done any research at all about Japan's policy of coerced confessions, or know of anyone who's been caught up in Japan's poor excuse of a judicial system. You'll sing a different tune if you're one of the unlucky ones. Not saying these guys are innocent, but those doing your best Nancy Grace impersonations by looking at this with blinders on is disconcerting to say the least.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Paul England JUN. 26, 2015 - 05:34AM JST Anyone read anything or done any research at all about Japan's policy of coerced confessions, or know of anyone who's been caught up in Japan's poor excuse of a judicial system.

In Japan, no-one outside the small interview room really knows what happens inside because suspects interviews take place behind closed doors without an attorney. The emphasis on confessions is also due to limited investigative powers that they have. The police in other countries can have plea bargaining, undercover operations and wire-tapping, so they rely on these techniques. In Japan, they are not allowed these powers so all they can do is to rely on confessions. Their limited power is due to historical reasons. Before WWII, the police abused their powers so people demanded that they give them all up after the war.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Pretty sad seeing such support for an archaic practice employed by a country, that everyone posting here should know, is highly flawed and inaccurate on it's best day.

But sometimes there is enough overwhelming evidence that warrants a short drop with a sudden stop.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

This animal deserved what he got. The poor girl begged for her life but they gagged her, put a polybag over her head and beat her to death with a hammer. Pure evil and now the mother has justice.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Not exactly sure but maybe their Buddhist religion plays a role in giving out lenient terms, that human beings are capable of changing for the better. Iam definitely for capital punishment if the evidence is all too glaring aside from true and real confession. I just can't name, but there are several parolees who have regressed and are repeat offenders, Iam hard up paying up my taxes esp when out of work. And I hate to imagine those criminals behind bars getting free board and lodging and medical services while I can not and city hall staff would prod me to pay up. Sigh, sigh!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In USA, lethal injection.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A website designed to bring crime minded people together. What a sick world we live in.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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