crime

DNA analysis identifies suspects in record 3,146 cases in 2018

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So, the cops have decided to join the 21st Century. Good on them, but, and if the article is to be believed here, the police have 2 separate data bases for DNA collection,

The agency has another database, launched in 2004, of DNA samples obtained from biological evidence left at crime scenes. It helped identify suspects in 2,870 cases last year, the sources said.

I get this, collecting data from crime scenes and that is just doing their jobs.

But this one, bothers me, quite a bit!

A DNA database maintained by Japanese police helped identify suspects in a record-high 3,146 cases in 2018, according to police sources.

Where and how was the data of 1.2 million people collected? In effect over 5,000 people have been identified as suspects using DNA evidence and not just the 3,146 noted in the article title.

Splitting hairs with data bases here!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

It’s not just the 1.2 million people on the database that should be worried, it’s all their blood relatives also who can be implicated by a partial DNA match.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

And I WANT to know how many people were FREED due to DNA evidence …………

Or was it not used, buried by prosecutors when it didn't match suspects in custody

And how about using this "NEW" technology on older cases...…………..be waiting on this one I suspect!!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Yubaru

I’m sure that when you go in for Annuals a little piece of you is left behind.

No doubt the government will see itself as entitled to having your DNA.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is an important reminder to never leave your DNA evidence near a criminal site, because you could be falsely implicated in some pretty horrendous stuff. This includes a variety of innocuous body elements such as fingernails, hair, skin flakes, mucous, saliva, earwax, used toothpicks, toe jam and even belly button lint. Be careful out there.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

When the article says 1.2 million, I believe it only means that they've collected 1.2 million samples from various crime scenes. They can't necessarily match these samples to any specific name or person in most cases, but once a suspect is arrested, it may be possible to link them to various unsolved crimes in the past.

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It is the first time the number has topped 3,000. The National Police Agency set up the database of DNA samples, taken from known suspects, in 2005.

As of April 30, the database stored DNA samples of more than 1.2 million people, the sources said.

The way I read it, the first database consists of DNA samples of more

than 1.2 million people who were known suspects at some point.

The agency has another database, launched in 2004, of DNA samples obtained from biological evidence left at crime scenes. It helped identify suspects in 2,870 cases last year, the sources said.

The second only holds samples from crime scenes.

Now I wonder if the first database only holds samples of those who were actually convicted or if they also keep samples of everbody else who was a suspect at one point.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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