crime

Police question ex-Aum fugitive Kikuchi about her 17 years on the run

64 Comments
By Harumi Ozawa

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© 2012 AFP

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64 Comments
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Now only 1 more to capture.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Based on previouse case I don't think the police are looking for them, are they?

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

When they approached the woman and asked if she was Kikuchi, she said “Yes”

Isn't that weird? I would definitely say; NO! I'M NOT!

2 ( +4 / -2 )

And, then ... there was 1.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I'm glad she was captured. Almost half her life on the run.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Now would be a good time for the long-overdue hanging of her old boss.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Folks, sure there officially only be 1 fugitive out there now, but deep deep down in the evil karma of Japan, thousands of fools ready to give their lives for such a horrible cult, like Aum Shinrikyo, so even if they capture all of these fugitives and finally give them the death penalty, younger ones are being brain washed just was we speak this very moment.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Japanese, it seems are very susceptible to cults, probably because of their collectivism culture. The way people rush out to buy things television programs tell them to buy. the way they feverishly devote themselves to one idol group. These cults reveal an underlying flaw in Japanese socieety

-4 ( +8 / -12 )

@Bob

These cults reveal an underlying flaw in Japanese society

When I hear the word "cult", one country's name immediately springs to mind. It's north of Mexico, south of Canada, and it ain't Japan.

11 ( +19 / -9 )

Sagamihara very close to home, kinda gives me the creeps thinking this evil women was in the neighbourhood. Glad she is now caught and hopefully gets whats coming to her, ie a knotted rope.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I wonder who gets the reward of 10 million yen leading directly to the arrest of Naoko Kikuchi.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Finally the tables are turned! At last the police not only believed they had the "right" person but they actually believed her when she confirmed their "guess"! Trying to make up for sending the other member on his way on New Years Eve?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

That cult is alive and well out there. They say they have reformed, but why should anyone believe that? Religion is dangerous to peace enough it its traditional form world wide. These cults are far more concerning.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Her, Asahara (who's on the waiting list) all deserve the rope..

I think she'll swing all right...

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

@Bob: Besides this Aum group, can you name ONE other Japanese cult?

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

Jonobugs - Panawave.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

OK, he had his run, so now he should hang or spend the rest of this life in jail. No parole for this guy.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@jonobugs, The Japanese Government, the Japanese Business culture, that is just to name a few.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

I'm still worried about Aum or some kind of doomsday cult .... especially as the police haven't found out who stole all that cyanide from that unlocked shed !

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Willi, the guy is a woman. See para 2.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The Statue of Limitations for murder was 15 years, when the crimw was comitted?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Panawave is a cult but hardly in the same league as Aum.

Actually some of the posters here should join it given their tin foil hat conspiracy theories. I'm talking to you in particular Mr. Mexicano.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Ah, panawave. The group that dressed in white for fear of harmful waves and was famous for trying to kidnap tama-chan, the seal. Very dangerous.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

@zichi I was going to say that the law specifically includes crimes whose statute of limitations hadn't yet expired at the time of change, even if they were committed before the change in the law, but the law came into effect in April 2010. Since the attacks were March 1995 and the statute was 15 years for murder, it would have expired the month before the law came into effect. I think you're totally right that these people should be legally off the hook.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@ReformedBasher

At the time of writing, Mr Mexicano has 5 thumbs up. That's almost a following...

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I once visited a cult in Japan. They were filthy rich or at least tried to make it look that way. Once you actually immerse yourself into the culture you will find it isn't an isolated example. The scariest thing was that they seemed obsessed with making money. To be honest, I was really shocked when I realised how much of it was going on around me.You might be interested to know that a very famous 100yen shop is linked to a cult ( I can't verify it though).

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@jonobugs

Officially registered cults/religions number in the tens of thousands in Japan. I think it's partly because as someone mentioned before Japan breeds a very collectivist culture through its education system, media etc. But the main reason is that religious institutions are exempted from tax. You'll find that many of these "cults" are little more that shrewd businessmen men who fabricate their own doctrines to dodge taxes.

If you want to see just how widespread this stuff is just dig up some information about one of Japan's biggest cults Soka Gakkai. I'm not sure what is scarier lunatic weirdo cults like Panawave or giant conspiracy cults like Soka Gakkai.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

"You might be interested to know that a very famous 100yen shop is linked to a cult ( I can't verify it though)."

Then why even bring it up?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

zichi, according to wiki,the crime was commited in 1995, but the change in criminal law which rowanM mentioned, included a clause which eliminated the statue of limitation for murder including this one. (Subway Sarin Attacks)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Even though the statute of limitations was 15 years at the time (1995) ,under the provisions of Section 2 of Article 254 of the Japanese penal code , the statute of limitations is suspended when an accomplice (accomplices) is indicted for the same crime.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

CrazyJoe, thank you for answering my question, I wasn't cleat on tht point.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@jonobugs Japan has one of the highest numbers of cults in the world. Around over 200,000 and rising since WWII. http://voices.yahoo.com/cults-japan-dangerous-epidemic-3332794.html

@lucabrasi if 'Murika comes to mind when you think of cults then you only paying attention to less than 5% of international news. America has had some of the most famous cults but that does not make america the cult capital of the world.

To this article I think it is strange that this woman just said "yes". Sounds like she wanted to get caught. Basically indirectly turning herself in. So that is two that turn themselves in. In a way it makes the Police look bad. If she was telling people "no" would they have ever caught her. I mean, How long was she going around telling people her real name. Did people just not believe her or what. I really confused about how she has been going around like this for 17 years. I can only guess that she recently stopped lying about her identity.

But if i was to make a conspiracy theory i could say its a plan. And the last guy will be caught on or around Dec 1, 2012

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

zichi

doumo desu

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What is ”the evil karma of Japan”?

I used to live in the facility of a religious organisation, Kurozumi-Kyou (sectarian Shinto) and attended some classes at their school. They struck me as being very pleasant people and not very interested in money.

Due to the effervescent, untrammelled individualism of the Japanese, there are lot of religions. Some of these have done nasty things, as have religious organisations the world over.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

What is taking JGov in executing the sentence of a convicted criminal Asahara. He should have been hung many years ago.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Ooppssss.... talking about the law statute of limitation.... why did it took them 15 years to implement the sentence. Mmmmm .... there must be some politicking going on inside to stop or delay the sentence. Asahara could be a big campaign donor to a ruling party. hehehehehe

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Not in a secured compound in Pakistan, not on some small southern Pacific island, not walking freely in the streets of North Korea, but most likely at Ozeki or Food One Super Market doing her thing unnoticed in Sagamihara for 17 years. That’s a life time for a high school person preparing for college.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Cults?? Sure, how about the ones that come up to you at any given train station and say that they want to pray for your hapiness?? To me these Mahi Kari etc..are just like vampires, they suck out your good energy! Any more cults?? They come a dime a dozen and we are next to South Korea, boy oh boy do they have a bunch of nutty cutls too!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

"but I’m relieved that I don’t have to run away anymore.” "I am sorry for running away for a long time.”

So, it that's true why didn't you just go and have a chat at the closest kouban years ago?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So, it that's true why didn't you just go and have a chat at the closest kouban years ago?

The koban police wouldn't know how to handle it. They would have probably turned her away and told her to go to the Tokyo police station to turn herself in.

Its only a matter of time before the get the last guy. As soon as they arrest the person or people who harbored Kikuchi, the people harboring the last guy will probably blow the whistle.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Haha, yeah I forgot about that.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

But the main reason is that religious institutions are exempted from tax. You'll find that many of these "cults" are little more that shrewd businessmen men who fabricate their own doctrines to dodge taxes.

True- good explanation of this can be found in the book about Aum, "The Cult at the End of the World" - and also how no one dares bother you once you've declared yourself a religion, in case you say you're being persecuted, discriminated against etc. As I recall from the book, years since I read it, there were big clues that Aum was up to no good but no one wanted to upset a religious group. Then look what happened.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Bob: Besides this Aum group, can you name ONE other Japanese cult?

PL and Soka Gakkai. The worst thing is that Japan allows Soka Gakkai into politics and turns their heads and ignores them. PL is the same - famous for baseball at their HS so many chose to ignore that they are a cult.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Police only seriously starting looking for her after the other guy turned himself in and they didn't believe him, the cops only care about their own image and perception of safety than doing their job. If they put the same effort they put into putting those posters up they would have caught them years ago.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm in the "Jesus cult" lol

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"The Statue of Limitations for murder was 15 years"

Maybe they'll get finally get rid of that stupid law.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

One goes down... another force rises.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

****I was new in japan at that time my kids is 18 and 17 now,i saw that much people suffering ,and the documenatary how they make and the gain ,its all sadness in their heart,coz the girlfreind goes to others,he joined this group of people.his very intellegent college student at that time yeah cause and effect.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"The Statue of Limitations for murder was 15 years"

Maybe they'll get finally get rid of that stupid law.

(May. 21, 2010) The Diet, Japan's legislature, amended the country's Criminal Procedure Law to abolish the statute of limitations for murder and other crimes that result in the deaths of persons. The amendments became effective on April 28, 2010, the day after the Law to Amend the Penal Code and the Criminal Procedure Law was promulgated (Law No. 26 of 2010). The new Law is applied to cases in which the statute of limitations had not run out as of its effective date, even if the crime was committed before the new Law's enactment. (Criminal Procedure Law, Law No. 131 of 1948, amended by Law No. 26, Attached Provisions, art. 3.)

http://www.loc.gov/lawweb/servlet/lloc_news?disp3_l205401985_text

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Personal opinion here, while I do believe she was guilty of a crime, and if people take a hard look into the circumstances surrounding her and her position in the cult at the time of the sarin attacks, I am scratching my head wondering if she was actually guilty of murder.

She was, when brought into the cult, a teenage girl, and brainwashed. How much responsibility does she have?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

According to NHK radio she admits to making the sarin but said she didn't know what it would be used for. She hadn't been using her real name.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Interesting that Asahara's real name was Chizuo and the fake name she assumed was Chizuko.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@LFRAgain I was hoping to have it confirmed by another reader. Is that OK with you?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

According to NHK radio she admits to making the sarin but said she didn't know what it would be used for. She hadn't been using her real name.

Actually, she claimed she didn't know what they were making at the time, or what it would be used for. That doesn't sound particularly culpable, particularly when you consider that in all likelihood, the statute of limitations has long since run out for her 'crimes'.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

17 years on the run, going down the local izakaya 3 nights a week with her mates, acc to NHK. Mmm, makes one wonder..

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's interesting that she now claims to repudiate Aum, but did you notice the name she chose for herself during her years on the run? "Chizuko." Asahara's birth name is "Chizuo." This tells me that after the attacks, she certainly understood what she had done and still continued to revere Asahara.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

This tells me that after the attacks, she certainly understood what she had done and still continued to revere Asahara.

To one who was seriously brainwashed what other explanation could their be?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You do realize that this is Japan, and she has beaten the statute of limitations. Even for murder, isn't it 10 years? (or 15, tops). Tried to watch TV yesterday but this was all that was on, loop after loop of her being driven to the cop station with her head down. Glad she was caught, but wonder what will happen.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

AWESOME! vonderful news

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The statute of limitations law was changed a few years ago....she will be tried for multiple murders rest assured.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Death penalty quick and fast

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The 1995 subway attack was one of Japan’s worst mass-murders

Let's call it what it was, shall we?

Domestic terrorism perpetrated by Japanese religious fanatics.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You would think the last two would have left the country by now. Its only a matter of time before the last one is caught.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yubaru san, I agree that she may have been "brainwashed." but she can't then claim, "I didn't know what I was making" as if if to say, "I wouldn't have done it had I known." The logic doesn't make sense. She did a very very bad thing (and brainwashed or not) she must pay for her actions.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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