crime

Ex-board chairman at Nihon University gets 1-year suspended sentence

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They sure do love handing out those suspended sentences in Japan. I guess they can keep those conviction rates up, while letting criminals with connections off the hook for their criminal activities. It's a win-win!

10 ( +16 / -6 )

Japanese law at it's best, yet again.

8 ( +13 / -5 )

Underreporting income huh, where have we heard that before. I presume this guy was treated in exactly the same way as others suspected of the same offense.

11 ( +14 / -3 )

The prosecutors had demanded a one-year prison term along with a 16 million yen fine.

The many organized crime and money laundering connections and abusive practices at the university... Nothing to see here.. move along.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

@HBJ

Underreporting income huh, where have we heard that before. I presume this guy was treated in exactly the same way as others suspected of the same offense.

It depends on how quickly you admit guilt if you don't then you are treated differently. If you do it straight away then you are let out quickly if you don't then you could spend months in holding and undergo long interrogations and if you are a foreigner then you are automatically considered a flight risk so will find getting bail difficult.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

He "stored the money at his house"? No co-defendants? Real (not pretend) remorse? Well, I'll at least give him credit for not trying to launder the money, or send it overseas.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

A former board chairman at one of Japan's largest universities was given a one-year suspended prison sentence, along with a fine of 13 million yen, on Tuesday for evading around 52 million yen in income tax.

Nice math.

Guy still have own 39 millions-equals to majority 10 years of income.

This suspended prison term is just too pathetic.

Law is here to protect rich and filthy?

Highly likely-yes!

8 ( +10 / -2 )

 was given a one-year suspended prison sentence, along with a fine of 13 million yen, on Tuesday for evading around 52 million yen in income tax.

It's just insane. Only one year was suspended and 13 million yen.

I think such a verdict will eager people to commit this kind of crimes.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I’m prepared the take a one year suspended sentence in return for ¥39 million.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@James

It depends on how quickly you admit guilt

But that depends on whether you are actually guilty or not!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Nice math.

Guy still have own 39 millions-equals to majority 10 years of income.

I’m prepared the take a one year suspended sentence in return for ¥39 million.

Try reading what is written.

He was caught, owned up and paid the 52 million.

This was a fine on top of that for trying to evade it in the first place.

All things considered, for a non violent crime he admitted to straight away and paid what was owed... A fine and a suspended sentence seems appropriate.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

A profitable deal for all concerned. The criminal gets convicted so prosecutors can keep their conviction rate up, criminal gets to keep the majority of the cash, and can spend it at his leisure instead of wait in prison, and nobody is convicted of kickbacks so business can continue as usual. It’s not like a foreigner or lowlife stole anything, right?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

criminal gets to keep the majority of the cash

What cash? Are you also unable to read?

This was undeclared income. Not stolen cash.

The amount of tax that should have been paid was 52 million.

He got caught. He admitted it, he paid the 52 million.

Then he was sent to court to be prosecuted for the crime of attempting to evade tax.

Court gave him a fine of 13 million and suspended sentence for the attempted tax evasion.

Why do you all seem to struggle with this?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Just wondering... if I do the exact same crime, I will also get the exact same suspended sentence?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@Rarereason

Nice math.

Guy still have own 39 millions-equals to majority 10 years of income.

I’m prepared the take a one year suspended sentence in return for ¥39 million.

Try reading what is written.

He was caught, owned up and paid the 52 million.

This was a fine on top of that for trying to evade it in the first place.

All things considered, for a non violent crime he admitted to straight away and paid what was owed... A fine and a suspended sentence seems appropriate.

It's a Kyodo article, hence: a mess.

Yes, you're right. He got caught, paid his taxes, paid a fine and got a suspended sentence, but in this mess of an article there is something else that the verdict is not touching on (actually, quite a few things):

*The Tokyo District Court found Hidetoshi Tanaka, who was head of the board of Nihon University in Tokyo, guilty, handing him the sentence, suspended for three years for underreporting a total of around 118 million yen in income in 2018 and 2020 by *excluding money derived from kickbacks.

Definition of "kickback" according to the Cambridge dictionary:

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/fr/dictionnaire/anglais/kickback

kickback

noun [ C ]UK  /ˈkɪk.bæk/ US  /ˈkɪk.bæk/

 an amount of money that is paid to someone illegally in exchange for secret help or work

Also:

Inoguchi, 64, and Yabumoto, 61, have been indicted for breach of trust for causing a loss of around 420 million yen to the university in connection with a project to rebuild a hospital affiliated with the educational institution.

The two have admitted to paying tens of millions of yen each to Tanaka for his help with the project and as congratulations on his reappointment to the chairman post.

Why did Inoguchi and Yabumoto get indicted for breach of trust and not Tanaka? Tanaka caused a 420 Mio JPY loss to his own university! Why is he not standing trial for this either? This does not even cover the reputational damage caused to the university which would be a whole separate matter. (One could argue that it should be up to his university to sue him...which may actually be difficult judging from the below paragraph...)

As others pointed out in the comments sections of earlier articles about this whole affair, one has to add to this that Tanaka was in cahoots with the mob for years, threatening if not blackmailing colleagues which is how he remained in place for all that time. Why is he not indicted for this either?

Corruption, breach of trust, loss of business, reputational damage, blackmail/threats, criminal association to name just a few.

The simple fact that Tanaka is (a) on trial only for tax-fraud is a complete joke and the (b) fact that ultimately goes scot-free (minus a fine of 13 Mio for a guy who pocketed over a 3-year time-span 118 Mio out of which 52 Mio coming from more than dubious origins) is in regard to all of the above-mentioned an even greater joke.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

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