crime

Ex-cop's appeal over murder of family denied; death penalty upheld

16 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

16 Comments
Login to comment

In the absence of witness accounts or a confession, the Fukuoka District Court found in December 2019 that Nakata was guilty of the murders, ruling out the possibility an intruder was responsible based on the police investigation and other evidence including security camera footage from near their home.

What "other evidence" besides the DNA, which could plausibly be explained away, unless the police found a corresponding scratch or other way the dna could have been found under the wife's fingernail.

The lower court had highlighted an injury on Nakata's arm believed to have been sustained when his wife was resisting his attack as evidence he was involved. A DNA sample of material taken from under one of the woman's fingernails matched that of Nakata.

If she had been resisting his attack, I would think there would be a hell of a lot more DNA evidence than just what they are stating here.

Be nice to know or read about more of what the prosecutors based their case on, since they dont have a confession.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

Reminds me of the case of Chris Watts in America. This is crazy and I cannot understand the mental state of the husbands who can actually do this. And, in this case, the husband was a Police Officer.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Motive? Any wife would have husband's DNA on her. Hard to believe he killed kids that age.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

If I don’t have my DNA on my wife, she’s not my wife.

The defense should have looked for other DNA on the wife’s fingernails. But given that only prosecutors can do the investigation in Japan, the husband is screwed.

I’m not surprised the judges found him guilty. In Japan, there is no “guilty beyond reasonable doubt”. They impose “guilty unless proven innocent”.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

The only way dna(her husband skin) can get on her nails is when she was struggling and scratch his arm while dying. He is as guilty as it can get. Not to mention from the security camera's there is literally no one else beside him who could have enter in the house. Unless the wife can somehow struggle herself to death, the husband is pretty much the suspect. Let him hang.

-7 ( +5 / -12 )

If guilty, I support the upholding of the punishment. If there is any shadow of doubt or a possibly of another reason for the loss of life then I think life would be appropriate.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

No one deserves the death penalty,this barbaric and outdated practice is abolished in most of the western civilized countries, and rightfully so.

-7 ( +7 / -14 )

So in Japan, citizens do not have the right to kill people, but the govt does.

Well, that's irrational and draconian. I thought Japan was a 'developed' nation.

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

The only way dna(her husband skin) can get on her nails is when she was struggling and scratch his arm while dying. He is as guilty as it can get. Not to mention from the security camera's there is literally no one else beside him who could have enter in the house. Unless the wife can somehow struggle herself to death, the husband is pretty much the suspect. Let him hang.

Then why is there no mention of any type of scratches or injuries to support your supposition here?

You assume as well that security cameras covered the entire area of the house and surrounding area, and unless there were cameras in all directions, this assumption is circumstantial at best.

I am sorry to see anyone face the death penalty based upon the flimsy evidence reported here, and with no confession as well, the sentence is not justified, other than the police wanting to close the case, whether he is actually guilty or not!

0 ( +4 / -4 )

No Sherlock Holmes here.

Evidence stated in article is light for a death penalty.

They should watch Prison break, have imagination...to save perhaps lives.

Of course, we don't have all the details so can only make assumptions.

Life is taken so lightly in Japan !

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I think there's a 99% chance that this guy is innocent.

How is DNA a evidence for people who live together??

Japanese police and prosecutors only cares about their success rates for evaluation, and rarely investigates anything sufficiently if they have an easy way out, such as forcing a confession. If they could not find a scapegoat, they will normally simply claim it is not a crime rather than risking investigating and failing.

My friend is currently serving time after forced into a confession for a deal that she did not commit. Japanese police use psychological torture to force confessions and rarely goes after real criminals. I'd say at least 50%+ of the people who are in prison are likely innocent. They are always looking for scapegoats who can quickly close the case for them.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Yes, evidence and probability considerations make that a very convincing outcome. An intruder from outside would have had to exactly plan the timespan between that husband going to work and the wife’s sister coming or have the corresponding big luck, the need of avoiding all cameras in the area , roads, convenience stores etc, and on top of that all even prepare the dead corpses and their temperatures , setting up dissolving or biological processes etc. such, that the suspicion or coroner’s expertise falls onto the husband again and into the timeframe when he still was there at night and early morning. That’s really quite a bit too much to perfectly handle by an outside killer.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I remember this case. He is probably guilty, but the evidence is too flimsy. I still think it is better if some guilty people slip through than to risk sentencing an innocent person.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If he is gulty, deserves punishment..

Murderes deserve death penalty !!..

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

*Murderers

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Murderes deserve death penalty !!..

That's called revenge It's also a 3rd world way of thinking.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites