crime

Ex-KAT-TUN singer Tanaka goes on trial for drug possession

36 Comments

A former member of KAT-TUN, an all-male idol group, went on trial in Chiba Prefecture on Thursday, charged with violating the Stimulants Control Law.

In the opening session at the Chiba District Court, Koki Tanaka, 36, pleaded guilty to possessing stimulants, Kyodo News reported. Tanaka was arrested on June 30, just nine days after he was convicted and given a suspended sentence for a similar crime earlier this year.

The court heard that Tanaka was acting in a “suspicious manner” outside Kashiwa Station at around 10 p.m. Prosecutors did not specify what Tanaka was doing, but said that he tried to avert the gaze of policer officers as they approached him. He was found to be in possession of a plastic bag containing stimulants.

The arrest came after the Nagoya District Court convicted Tanaka on June 21 and sentenced him to 20 months in prison, suspended for three years.

In that case, after Tanaka checked out of his hotel room in Nagoya on Jan 30, around 0.164 grams of methamphetamine were found by a cleaning worker. At the time, he was in Nagoya for a live concert and was staying at the business hotel. He was arrested on Feb 24.

The judge handed Tanaka a suspended sentence, saying the singer had shown regret for his actions, and urged him to seek help in order to stay off drugs.

Tanaka was a member of KAT-TUN from 2001 until 2013. He was arrested once before, in May 2017, for possession of marijuana but was not indicted.

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36 Comments
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This no hoper re-offending drug fiend must be sentenced for some hard time in prison.

-18 ( +6 / -24 )

This no hoper re-offending drug fiend must be sentenced for some hard time in prison.

The good ol' ridiculous idea that a health issue can be solved through the prison system.

Remember that old definition of insanity? Repeatedly doing something that hasn't worked, and expecting it to? That's what criminally punishing people for a health issues is. Insanity. But so many have been brainwashed for so many years, and lack the ability to think objectively outside their cultural conditioning, and instead parrot those same things they were conditioned to say, regardless of the lack of logic, and effective outcome.

11 ( +19 / -8 )

Remember that old definition of insanity? Repeatedly doing something that hasn't worked, and expecting it to? That's what criminally punishing people for a health issues is. Insanity. But so many have been brainwashed for so many years, and lack the ability to think objectively outside their cultural conditioning, and instead parrot those same things they were conditioned to say, regardless of the lack of logic, and effective outcome.

Guess we should legalize and turn Tokyo into a zombie wasteland like the Californian liberal cities of LA or SanFran? Druggies lying on the roads. Stepping over crack heads while walking our kids to the Hoikuen. No thanks, we need to be hard on drugs.

-18 ( +7 / -25 )

we need to be hard on drugs.

As I said:

Remember that old definition of insanity? Repeatedly doing something that hasn't worked, and expecting it to? That's what criminally punishing people for a health issues is. Insanity.

Hasn't worked ever, and you're pushing it as the correct path to take. Because that takes intelligence, right?

17 ( +20 / -3 )

Obviously the reason for the arrest is just an excuse, the police was onto Tanaka and clearly understood he was not over his addiction.

The biggest problem is that this completely undermines the decision of the first Judge to show clemency because Tanaka refused to get help, he got it easy before, not likely to get it now and this may become a dangerous precedent for other people that could have benefitted from that clemency and had a genuine intention to fight their addiction.

10 ( +15 / -5 )

The biggest problem is that this completely undermines the decision of the first Judge to show clemency because Tanaka refused to get help, he got it easy before, not likely to get it now and this may become a dangerous precedent for other people that could have benefitted from that clemency

80% of first time drug offenders in Japan receive a suspended sentence. That number hasn't changed with the re-arrest of other celebrities for drug crimes, so it's unlikely to have that effect this time either.

6 ( +12 / -6 )

This is his 3rd strike... I gotta think he'll see some jail time now. What is the standard sentence if a foreigner is caught with drugs in Japan for the 1st time, anyone know?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

This is his 3rd strike... I gotta think he'll see some jail time now. What is the standard sentence if a foreigner is caught with drugs in Japan for the 1st time, anyone know?

Suspended sentence. But then the immigration department will generally deport the person afterward.

9 ( +15 / -6 )

80% of first time drug offenders in Japan receive a suspended sentence. That number hasn't changed with the re-arrest of other celebrities for drug crimes, so it's unlikely to have that effect this time either.

Sincerely hope so, but Japanese courts have been deeply irrational before, it is not that hard to believe that a case with such strong publicity can lead to judges becoming more strict in their sentencing to avoid being seen as making a mistake.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Obviously the reason for the arrest is just an excuse, the police was onto Tanaka and clearly understood he was not over his addiction. 

He was arrested as "an excuse"? I do not see anything under Japanese law making "an excuse" illegal. Excuse means something offered as justification. He was arrested for possession of stimulants, which is illegal. There was no mention in any of the courts of an "excuse".

The biggest problem is that this completely undermines the decision of the first Judge to show clemency because Tanaka refused to get help, he got it easy before, not likely to get it now and this may become a dangerous precedent for other people that could have benefitted from that clemency and had a genuine intention to fight their addiction.

What is the problem? And who is it a problem for? This is Japan--it is certainly a problem to possess illegal substances. But this is not the first time someone received clemency, only to later violate the terms of that clemency and get into trouble again.

No precedent is set here, as this is not the first time someone was convicted of a crime, given a light sentence, but reoffended later.

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

Sincerely hope so, but Japanese courts have been deeply irrational before, it is not that hard to believe that a case with such strong publicity can lead to judges becoming more strict in their sentencing to avoid being seen as making a mistake.

There's no precedent for that, while there is precedent for them not changing sentencing guidelines even after a celebrity is arrested multiple times by drug use.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

He was arrested as "an excuse"?

As an excuse for what? that is not what is written in the text you quoted, it is clearly explained that I believe the reason used for the arrest is the excuse, not the arrest itself.

Also, the only one saying this is illegal is you, so you just demonstrated your own baseless assumption is wrong.

What is the problem? And who is it a problem for? 

Once again, explained in the text you quoted but apparently refused to read, it is a problem for people for whom this clemency is much better justified.

No precedent is set here

Is this a legal argument? based exactly on what? are you claiming authority on the field to decide it?

2 ( +7 / -5 )

There's no precedent for that, while there is precedent for them not changing sentencing guidelines even after a celebrity is arrested multiple times by drug use.

Again, if that is the case it would be extremely good, my lack of confidence about this perfectly logical and rational lack of consequences comes from previous examples of judges giving unreasonable sentences that could be explained more easily by pressure from the society than from what the guidelines would indicate.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Tanaka is a danger to the morality of the youngsters in this country. Foppish hair, effeminate dancing with his "friends", probably tattoos and repeated drug offenses. They need to make an example of him. 6 years of hard labor would sort him out.

-11 ( +4 / -15 )

This poor schmo probably really believed he was a big star, but then one day he woke up, looked at his bank account, looked around at his washed up career, his lack of future prospects, and then decided to get high instead of thinking about it any further.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Obviously the reason for the arrest is just an excuse, the police was onto Tanaka and clearly understood he was not over his addiction.

Do you have any evidence of that? Double blind studies? Links?

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

Descendent - pretty detailed analysis there. You live on his street ? Know his mam ? Going drinking with Uncle Ichi ?

3 ( +6 / -3 )

It'll be interesting to see how they'll explain away the fact that he's not going to prison despite committing a crime during a suspended sentence. Time in and out, in this land of suspended sentences, you hear it justified with a "S/he has showed remorse, and if they commit another crime while the suspended sentence is in effect, they will automatically go to prison for that time." But, I doubt this guy will see prison. So, what will it be this time?

"We will add a NEW suspended sentence to his previously suspended one. And THIS time, if he does it again (unless he does it again), he'll go to prison for the suspended term!"

"He has shown remorse again, so we see no need for further punishment. Only another suspended sentence and a fine."

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Do you have any evidence of that? Double blind studies? Links?

What kind of double blind studies do you think would address this? do you understand what those studies are and what kind of information they can help with?

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Seems to be a binary situation among some posters: hard labor, throw away the key vs complete legalization.

There is a third option: Portugal and Oregon state in the US.

Those places ‘arrest’ drug addicts, put them in rehab, counseling, even find them jobs. I.e. treat them like sick people.

This lowers the number of druggies while saving the governments millions of dollars that they’d usually spend on prisons.

https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/04/18/524380027/in-portugal-drug-use-is-treated-as-a-medical-issue-not-a-crime

6 ( +7 / -1 )

There is a third option: Portugal and Oregon state in the US.

Those places ‘arrest’ drug addicts, put them in rehab, counseling, even find them jobs. I.e. treat them like sick people.

They treat a health problem, with the health-care system. It's the intelligent way to manage drug use.

So many still push the outdated idea that the prison system can somehow fix a health issue:

This no hoper re-offending drug fiend must be sentenced for some hard time in prison.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Shabu is a nasty substance. Had a neighbor when I lived in Thailand who was hooked on it. Turned him into a human rat, yuck.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

the singer had shown regret for his actions, and urged him to seek help in order to stay off drugs.

> Those places ‘arrest’ drug addicts, put them in rehab, counseling, even find them jobs. I.e. treat them like sick people.

They treat a health problem, with the health-care system. It's the intelligent way to manage drug use.

So many still push the outdated idea that the prison system can somehow fix a health issue:

This no hoper re-offending drug fiend must be sentenced for some hard time in prison.

Tanaka sounds like Scott Weiland, formerly of Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver. He kept on going into rehab, revolving door. Sometimes he just plain walked out on it. You need to be willing to help yourself as well and apparently, he didn't give a damn.

He started up a solo career with a new band and a CD to tour for. During that tour he consumed a cocktail mix of really rotten drugs and died while enroute to the next tour stop, in exactly the same manner that Hank Williams Sr. drank himself to death.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

As an excuse for what? that is not what is written in the text you quoted, it is clearly explained that I believe the reason used for the arrest is the excuse, not the arrest itself.

Police in Japan don't arrest someone for an "excuse". The reality is, Japan has an established legal system, and no one has ever been convicted in court as an "excuse".

The facts of this case are obvious, and it is obvious Tanaka was not arrested as an "excuse":

The court heard that Tanaka was acting in a “suspicious manner” outside Kashiwa Station at around 10 p.m. Prosecutors did not specify what Tanaka was doing, but said that he tried to avert the gaze of policer officers as they approached him. He was found to be in possession of a plastic bag containing stimulants.

-10 ( +0 / -10 )

Police in Japan don't arrest someone for an "excuse".

Again making a complete mischaraterization of what you are discussing? what is the purpose of purposefully "misunderstanding" something and then refuting what only you have said?

The excuse is not what is the basis of the arrest, that would be the illegal drugs they found, the excuse is for the search, which also is not something that is illegal as you falsely claimed I said.

I already corrected you on this, his arrest is not the excuse (that is all your "misunderstanding") the only reason you have to persist on discussing this argument nobody made but yourself is because you can't do anything to actually refute the actual point made.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Obviously the reason for the arrest is just an excuse,

The reason for the arrest is clear as day.

He was found to be in possession of a plastic bag containing stimulants.

That's not an excuse. The reason is the possession of stimulants.

the excuse is for the search,

Now you're trying to change your statement based on getting called out for making an obviously nonsensical remark. An excuse is seeking to defend or justify. In this case, the police do not need to defend or justify anything. Tanaka was the one arrested, and tried in court. Tanaka would have needed an excuse.

I corrected you on your mistake and misunderstanding already; kind of cringeing to see you try and weasel out of another of your unsubstantiated opinions.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

The reason for the arrest is clear as day.

Again yes, the presence of drugs, I already corrected on this mistake of you, I never said the cause of the arrest is an excuse, what can be an excuse is the reason for the search, Why ignore the correction? is it because it completely defeats your point?

Now you're trying to change your statement based on getting called out for making an obviously nonsensical remark. 

You get called of for a nonsensical interpretation of something that made sense to other people without problem, so your defense is to say your way to understand something is nonsensical? well yes, that is the whole point I am making.

An excuse is seeking to defend or justify

Yes, the search.

I corrected you on your mistake and misunderstanding already;

No you did not, you "corrected" me on your misunderstanding, which means you only corrected yourself.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

when you are found in possession of illegal drugs in Japan, I dont really care by what method the police determined you have them.

-11 ( +0 / -11 )

The man is an addict. He doesn’t need prison, he needs treatment, involuntary if necessary.

The cops were definitely gunning for him as they do with Celebrities once they’re on to them. They’re the low-hanging fruit that grabs headlines without any of the leg work of actually combatting narcotics.

And these drugs are very, VERY bad. This isn’t weed, this stuff will turn lives to absolute ruin.

Too bad nobody really puts the screws to the importers/ distributors/ dealers. They’re all yaks and they’re smart enough to grease the skids.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

This dude is going to be found comatose in a flophouse with a needle in his arm and a midget blowing coke up his rear if he is not careful.

Down with drugs!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Throw the book at him.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

tamanegi - This no hoper re-offending drug fiend must be sentenced for some hard time in prison.

Flight Deck - Throw the book at him.

Who exactly did he harm to deserve such punishment?

Mr Kipling - Tanaka is a danger to the morality of the youngsters in this country. Foppish hair, effeminate dancing with his "friends", probably tattoos and repeated drug offenses.

Oh no! Not tattoos!!! Egads!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Who exactly did he harm to deserve such punishment?

He's participating in, enabling, and contributing to the continued operation of an "industry" that has killed untold numbers of people around the world and has destroyed so many lives.

And he's done so repeatedly, presumably with the idea that as a famous celebrity, he's somehow above the law.

Yes, he needs treatment. But he also needs incarceration -- that's the undeniable truth for anyone who continually flaunts the law as he does.

Involvement in drugs is not a victimless crime. Not even if one is "just using."

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Flight DeckSep. 23  11:28 pm JST

Who exactly did he harm to deserve such punishment?

He's participating in, enabling, and contributing to the continued operation of an "industry" that has killed untold numbers of people around the world and has destroyed so many lives.

And he's done so repeatedly, presumably with the idea that as a famous celebrity, he's somehow above the law.

Nobody is above the law.

BungleSep. 23  04:56 pm JST

This dude is going to be found comatose in a flophouse with a needle in his arm and a midget blowing coke up his rear if he is not careful.

Down with drugs!

And this isn't just a case of alcohol or weed either. This is heavy hard stuff, dangerous stuff that can kill you.

Drugs Suck.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Meth / Shabu is total trash. Here in Florida it is rampant all over the state.

I’ve known people in Japan that used it and watched them deteriorate.

Everyone knows the raw materials for this poison is sold by china in mass quantity to anyone that has the money and it’s manufactured in North Korea and shipped into Japan to your friendly neighborhood Yakuza warehouse. Don’t expect anything to change, there’s too much money involved.

It’s just like the U.S. “War on Drugs”.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Jeez the cops needed a magnifying glass to see the drugs he possessed and it would hardly tip a scale

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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