crime

Ex-Tokyo Olympic exec, business ally allegedly shared bribe

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Takahashi and Kazumasa Fukami, both former executives of Japan's largest advertising agency Dentsu Inc, are suspected of using consulting firms that they now head to receive the money.

"It's a big club, and you ain't in it".

The club is oligarchic capitalism.

Companies like Dentsu are invulnerable.

Japan could be vulnerable to a strongman who would nationalize and expropriate such crony corporatism and punish the complicit bureaucrats.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Dentsu previously known as the Ministry of Propaganda ( 1945) has close ties (obviously) to the LDP. They are untouchable even when all the evidence (alleged) point at their involvement in numerous scams of tax payer money (allegedly). But that’s a no go area for prosecutors as the LDP will simply say to prosecutors and the courts…don’t. And the corruption can continue. A separation of law and government would bring the house down.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Fukami's firm, called "Commons 2,"

Wow, the corruption is so ubiquitous and absolute that they nonchalantly name their sham front companies 'commons' and 'commons 2'. Guess you don't have to try very hard when you know you have Dentsu's protection and the government's support.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The Unification Church, Dentsu, and the LDP are all peas from the same pod. Japan inc. is rotten to the core.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

The only way to deal with corruption and bribery is to…legalize it!

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Wow, it is surprising to see how the participants of the corruption are being identified and charged now.

It would be better if this happened before the Olympic games, but late is much better than never.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Funny how these prosecutors seems to have forgotten about Mori...some people are obviously above the law ..

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Takahashi and Kazumasa Fukami, both former executives of Japan's largest advertising agency Dentsu Inc, are suspected of using consulting firms that they now head to receive the money.

A second suspect who happens to also be a former Dentsu exec. How so..."unexpected" (#sarcasm)

Fukami's firm, called "Commons 2," produced commercials for clients introduced by Takahashi, who used to be his boss at Dentsu and has a wide network of contacts in sports and other business circles.

Which "wide network of contacts in sports and other business circles" being courtesy of, of course, none other than...Dentsu.

In the Daiko case, they allegedly told a Daiko corporate officer to send the 15 million yen to Fukami's firm after he asked for their help in arranging for the advertising company to act as the agent for the English school operator.

Which sounds pretty much like the "services" that are offered by...Dentsu.

J-coppers no minna-san...No? Really? No light going up upstairs? No other super-big-and-household-name-company's office to raid? Reaaaaally?

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

This is obviously not limited to the Olympics and is just business as usual for Japan.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

The amount of bribery is shockingly low, comparing to corrupt bureaucrats in Southeast Asia, China and even the US.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

LDP.... the Liberal Dentsu Party

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Just in case, corruption (bribery in particular) is part of everyday business and political practice in Japan and has been for centuries, as it has in the rest of Asia. The West (barring the US, perhaps), however, is where you will find the lowest levels of corruption (NZ, Denmark, Finland etc.). The US and Japan are ranked the same, but I think Japan doesn't;t have a very robust process of rooting out and punishing corruption since everyone is doing it.

I am sarcastically suggesting that Japanese politicians go to jail for a peanut amount of money, while American/Asian politicians walk unscathed with a much higher amount.

Assuming sarcasm here, but you never know. :)

It is.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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