crime

Execs accused of illegally exporting bioweapon equipment sue gov't

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"hid evidence that was disadvantageous to the investigation in order to build a case" despite it being obvious that the items in question were not subject to regulations, while the prosecutors also "failed to give sufficient consideration to the indictment.".

Evidence show no crime, so they just rely on confession to prove that is a crime. Luckily those plaintiffsthey insist their innocent until that case is being canceled.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I really hope they win!!!

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Prosecutors made the biggest mistake against the company because the spray dryers the company made are nothing wrong to export with the law. This is a false indictment. Prosecutors did not check the mechanical system carefully. The spray dryers never become part of biological weapons. Prosecutors should apologize and compensate the plaintiffs.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Arrested in March and May and released on bail next February.

Case dropped 4 days before trial. No apology, and suspicion of a crime being done actually by the prosecutors.

Pretty bad treatment of a citizen who (if not guilty) has been wrongfully accused, conspired against, been thrown in prison at an elderly age and one of them is probably dead from the stress of it all.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

The plaintiffs asserted that the Tokyo police "hid evidence that was disadvantageous to the investigation in order to build a case" despite it being obvious that the items in question were not subject to regulations …

An outrageous characteristic of Japan’s "justice" system is the practice to allow exculpatory evidence — evidence that would exonerate the defendant of the alleged crime — to be withheld from the defense. This was reported in a January 2020 Japan Times column by Colin P.A. Jones, a professor at Doshisha Law School in Kyoto and primary author of "The Japanese Legal System."

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Became nowadays so very much unimportant…lol It’s obviously sufficient to open a laboratory door for some seconds and done. The whole world in mess , already without all those criminals and their potential bio weapons accessories and machinery.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It seems to me Japan government and Tokyo government pay 560 millions yen to plaintiffs but they would not apologize them. Those top prosecutors and top officers of Tokyo Metropolis Police should be resigned because of the such a stupid false accusation/indictment.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Arrested in March and May and released on bail next February.

Disgusting. Probablyheld im isolation too. Japans judges must be a bunch of imbeciles for allowing this.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

If they had confessed they would be in prison now for many years.

Japan's "justice" system is broken, with most imprisonment achieved via forced confessions from psychological torture, even if there's zero evidence.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I bet there is more to this story that just can't be made public.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

spray dryers, widely used to produce food products such as instant coffee

So they're just going to allow more instant coffee to be produced, with no punishment?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Sounds more like someone is trying to control the food market industry competition's and not the biological weapons manufacture.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The plaintiffs asserted that the Tokyo police "hid evidence that was disadvantageous to the investigation in order to build a case" despite it being obvious that the items in question were not subject to regulations, while the prosecutors also "failed to give sufficient consideration to the indictment."

My honest thought when I read this is ... look, the three of you are NOT random plebes on the street, but a big business. You know that you are navigating in tricky waters because you are making spray dryers that:

Considered equipment that can potentially be diverted to military use overseas, they are subject to international export regulations depending on their size and function.

You know what you exported, right? You know what's written in the law and if you aren't sure there is an approval process. How exactly can the Tokyo police hide evidence disadvantageous to the investigation that YOU don't know about?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"There has been no apology from the investigators. I want to prove my innocence and restore the company's reputation for the sake of the former executive who died," Okawara said after filing the lawsuit.

If an innocent person has " I want to prove my innocence", then you know that the justice system is fundamentally flawed.

The plaintiffs asserted that the Tokyo police "hid evidence that was disadvantageous to the investigation in order to build a case" despite it being obvious that the items in question were not subject to regulations, while the prosecutors also "failed to give sufficient consideration to the indictment."

Hostage justice in reality.

the prosecutors withdrew the indictment of the two men, saying that "doubts have arisen as to whether they are guilty of a crime."

Let this sink in. They set the whole justice machine in motion, claiming they had irrefutable evidence (because they have set up the justice machine in motion). After the whole judicial machine is up and running, they suddenly release this, suddenly have doubts. Unbelievable.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

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