crime

Expensive tissue paper at Osaka prison prompts human rights concern

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Shogun36, “The inmates used to have birthday parties or special events.”

Birthday parties for individuals, or one party per month for everyone with a birthday that month? I do know prisons have special items on the menus for New Year meals as such.

I don't remember the details on that. I just remember hearing her stories about it in general.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The inmates used to have birthday parties or special events. At said events, the inmates would get lavish spreads including turkey, cake, and so on.

Sorry I have to dismiss that even beyond the standard of an urban myth. The food budget per prisoner per day is ¥500.

Hey, that's what she told me. Whether it was true or not, I don't know. But I am also sure each prison has their own set of rules in effect.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Shogun36, “The inmates used to have birthday parties or special events.”

Birthday parties for individuals, or one party per month for everyone with a birthday that month? I do know prisons have special items on the menus for New Year meals as such.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The inmates used to have birthday parties or special events. At said events, the inmates would get lavish spreads including turkey, cake, and so on.

Sorry I have to dismiss that even beyond the standard of an urban myth. The food budget per prisoner per day is ¥500.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I used to know a woman who worked at a female prison facility.

The inmates used to have birthday parties or special events. At said events, the inmates would get lavish spreads including turkey, cake, and so on.

My friend the prison guard said that their meals were a lot better than her own. That is because her salary was so low, she couldn't afford to make spectacular lunch boxes for herself.

So it looks like the money the prisoners pay for daily items aren't going to the prison guards. Someone else is reaping the benefits here.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Thought japan used the waterjets now. Been a while, but seen online

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

They are talking about nearly ¥600 for a box of tissues, not toilet paper. These kinds of extortion prices promote a black market within the prison. However, there is very little in Japanese life that doesn't involve some kind of extortive pricing or 'money for nothing' payments. Why should prison be any different?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The price of the products at the prison rose after the Justice Ministry switched the designated seller in 2011 to a Tokyo-based firm under a major trading house from a foundation operated by former correctional officers, it said.

I read that as the products were cheaper when they were provided by the former officers foundation. Since the trading house has taken over the supply the prices have been hiked.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Rainyday you have it backwards as well. The guards gave them the better deal.

I could care less about the prisoners, but the price-fixing everywhere else in Japan is annoying. Some of the public school uniforms are more expensive than luxury brands...

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Yet another addition to the list of Japans legal systems dossier of shame.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

I remembered the prison-made merchandise can be purchased online now:

https://www.e-capic.com/smp/

4 ( +4 / -0 )

GoodlucktoyouToday  12:27 pm JST

“Instead of locking criminals in cells for long hours, how about giving them the opportunity to make their own toothbrushes, paper, blankets etc?”

I don’t hear much about prisoners making items for their own use (other than meals that is). But prisons have a variety of workshops/factories that make all sorts of things from clothing to traditional craft products to furniture. It’s part of the rehabilitation system to give the inmates pride, skills , getting used to a regular schedule, some cash to buy necessities or small treats, etc. Once a year or so the local department store has an event featuring the prison made products. These events travel the country, if you’re interested look for information about one in your own town.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

although it seems unfair.. that is just part of the cost of doing crimes and going to jail.

Exactly what the former prison guards making a fortune off of selling toilet paper at 5 times the going rate to a (literally) captive market want you to believe.

If you think criminals aren't being punished severely enough the solution is upping their sentences, not turning the prisons into a corrupt racket for guards to pad their retirements with.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Talk about having a captive audience.

Japanese prisons are terrible, punishment only and no attempt at rehabilitation, and people fleecing the inmates makes them worse. It sounds like prisoners in the US were used (by a private company, of course) as frontline firefighters in the California wildfires last year for a few cents an hour, so it's not just Japan. All such profiteering from inmates is abhorrent. Prisons should be a necessary evil, not an easy business chance for the well connected.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

The prisoners are able to work but not forced to.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Instead of locking criminals in cells for long hours, how about giving them the opportunity to make their own toothbrushes, paper, blankets etc? Or, is it a racketeering business?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Amnesty International has attempted to shine a light on the Japanese prison system for decades, to no avail. The MoJ simply stonewalls them and denies them access to facilities. The public knows virtually nothing about the system or how it operates, which is exactly how the government likes it.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

You still need paper even if the toilet is a squat toilet obviously. Even if they all had Apricot Washlets in their cells.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Backpacking Nepal,

There is a very wide variety of toilets in Japan. Jail facilities also vary, but I’ve seen photos and videos of some with western style, not squat, toilet fixtures. In any case, I believe the article’s reference to tissue paper, is not toilet paper.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

I thought Asians use squats and pipewater. It's clean this way though because the rolls have lot of bacteria no matter how expensive they are or eco.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

although it seems unfair.. that is just part of the cost of doing crimes and going to jail.

i would hope they double the prices.

-10 ( +3 / -13 )

It's like being punished twice.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

It's a disastrous situation when a simple question about profiteering off incarcerated people (tissues) unraveled systematic abuse that is government sanctioned. Just another example how bent out of shape the idea of normal has become.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Kurisupisu, You’re welcome. Although on second thought we don’t know who runs the “Tokyo-based firm under a major trading house”. Could be it’s also run by former prison officials. If so though, the article really should state that.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

@Educator60

Yes, I recant-thanks

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Well, I guess the prisoners who are locked up for extortion get to see what it’s like to be on the other side.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

In Japan the whole system of incarceration is a pile of poo. It'll take more than toilet paper to clean up the filth hidden from public view. Japanese prisons reflect the shameful lack of government accountability and display their contempt and disrespect for human rights; prisons are the last refuge of the ruling elite's feudalistic, anti-democratic reflexes. It's way overdue for the media to pull their heads out and shine a light on the dark practices of prison life.

11 ( +14 / -3 )

KurisupisuToday  07:03 am JST

“Former prison officers fleecing the prisoners?

Who would have thought it possible?”

Kurisupisu,

You have things backwards and need to read this paragraph again:

The price of the products at the prison rose after the Justice Ministry switched the designated seller in 2011 to a Tokyo-based firm under a major trading house from a foundation operated by former correctional officers, it said.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

@Cricky

just add the correct prefix to ‘justice’ and it all will make perfect sense.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

Theft, price fixing, racketeering, and that's the ministry of Justice?

23 ( +24 / -1 )

designated seller in 2011 to a Tokyo-based firm under a major trading house from a foundation operated by former correctional officers

Another amakudari scheme?

21 ( +21 / -0 )

Former prison officers fleecing the prisoners?

Who would have thought it possible?

21 ( +23 / -2 )

Can't they just source all of this stuff through Daiso or something?

11 ( +12 / -1 )

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