crime

Fear and murder plague Fukuoka golf courses over a checkbox on application forms

21 Comments
By RocketNews24

In recent years, there has been a growing trend among golf courses all over Japan to include a new field on their application form. This space contains a checkbox next to the pledge that the applicant “does not belong to an organized crime group.”

According to the West Golf Course Manager Federation, all of the golf courses in Kyushu’s prefectures of Oita, Nagasaki, Saga, and Kagoshima have included the pledge. However, in the remaining prefecture of Fukuoka, only 14 of their 49 courses have done the same.

The reason for this occurred 16 years ago when high-ranking people believed to be connected to the Kudo-kai yakuza clan were denied entry to a certain golf club in the city of Kitakyushu. Shortly after, a manager there was found dead with a knife in his chest. Since then, other nearby golf course managers have been hesitant to refuse service to anyone who looks connected.

Police and other courses have reached out hoping for more unity among the golf industry in Fukuoka. However, the hold-outs are remaining firm saying that unless they get significant police protection, they aren’t putting their lives on the line for a checkbox. Logic would dictate that there is a huge difference between turning away a mob boss to his face and employing a ridiculously easy to circumvent question on your application form, but it would seem they simply aren’t taking any chances.

The West Golf Course Manager Federation stands with them, admitting that “circumstances in each region must be considered uniquely.”

Source: Sankei News West

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21 Comments
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Seems to me they are not the brightest bunch if they can't even pass that question.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Police all over Japan are pushing golf clubs to make a house rule of disallowing admission of organized crime members.

https://www.police.pref.niigata.jp/sotai/soshiki_hanzai/ippan_rei_golf.pdf

The true aim of the move is to secure "consulting business" by retired police officers to exclude mobs from golf courses. The police do not disclose the names of the organized crime members. The only way for the golf clubs to know if an applicant is an organized crime member or not is by paying fees to the "consultant" who are retired police officers.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

They don't call them golf clubs for nothing.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"The police do not disclose the names of the organized crime members. The only way for the golf clubs to know if an applicant is an organized crime member or not is by paying fees to the "consultant" who are retired police officers". nice: a fee based yak-stone system

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The only way for the golf clubs to know if an applicant is an organized crime member or not is by paying fees to the "consultant" who are retired police officers.

"See, you can pay off that mob... or you can pay off our mob."

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Logic would dictate

I don't think Vulcan philosophy dictates involve golf courses.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What? The "no tattoos" signs in the baths aren't enough? You don't say...

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Nothing new, I had the same question when I joined a gym. Follow the same procedure as when your doctor asks "do you drink too much?" ...... Nope

1 ( +1 / -0 )

However, in the remaining prefecture of Fukuoka, only 14 of their 49 courses have done the same.

Proving that some golf courses do indeed have more balls than others.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

So the golf courses are relying on the honesty of gangsters? Really? Big foreign car parked outside, mob of scary chaps dressed badly accompanying a chap like a protective shield. Ticks the “does not belong to an organised crime group” box and everyone is happy.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Has anyone tried swinging a golf club accurately minus a pinky? Can it actually be done?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"Logic would dictate that there is a huge difference between turning away a mob boss to his face and employing a ridiculously easy to circumvent question on your application form"

Well, it is Japan, after all. Don't forget, instead of asking for ID they just ask you to click a button to confirm you are more than 18 if buying alcohol or smokes -- just like porn sites on the net, because no one would lie, and if the person said they are 18 or not in the mafia than what business do you have asking them to follow the law if you suspect otherwise?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

A.N. Other

Has anyone tried swinging a golf club accurately minus a pinky? Can it actually be done?

I would imagine that the overlap grip would be challenging...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why does Japan permit organized crime like the Yakuza?

Isn't the collusion between government and the ultra-rich capitalist families enough?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If a person could stab another in the chest, telling a little lie that they don't belong to an organized crime group should be a breeze.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This is all very funny, since building golf courses is one way organized crime groups get construction kickbacks

3 ( +3 / -0 )

So ridiculous! First, Yakuza could deny they were criminals by not ticking the box, but apparently they are honest truth-telling Japanese and cannot do that! Second, they are trying to stop criminals from playing golf so that they spend more time doing what they are supposed to do?! What is wrong about some people playing some game in a vast field? Install some camera if you are concerned!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

nedinjapanSEP. 07, 2016 - 07:16AM JST

So ridiculous! First, Yakuza could deny they were criminals by not ticking the box,

Providing false information on a contract application is a crime with a punishment of 10 years or less in prison. I do not like this clause applied to criminal organization because the definition of criminal organization is not clear and police and court tend to have very expanded and relaxed definition that could include anyone. There are many actual cases in Japan where those who the court determined as Yakuza affiliates were imprisoned for checking a wrong box at golf course reception.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Why does Japan permit organized crime like the Yakuza?

Isn't the collusion between government and the ultra-rich capitalist families enough?

In a line up, could you differentiate between a government member and a yak? No? There is a reason....

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In Kyushu, other yakuza groups stay away from KucouKai that always tried to crush other yakuza business by violence. When Yamaduchigumi did Kyushu sensor, Kyushu yakuza together could ask peace treaty specialized Oyabus in Yamaguchi ken but no one wants anything to do with Kucoukai that once invaded to Shimano semi and destroyed Abe's campaign office. yakuza or golfers or gamblers,, they don't want too be killed.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why does Japan permit organized crime like the Yakuza?

Because it is preferable to discorganized crime. I'm serious. I've had Japanese operating in quasi legal areas tell me just that.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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