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Filipino woman admits to killing sister, Japanese niece

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Absolute evil monster of a woman. She is definitely going to hang for this. Rest in Peace to the poor, innocent victims.

15 ( +27 / -12 )

Sounds more like they were fighting over the victim's money. It's not good to let anyone, even close relatives, know you are carrying a good sum of money. Don't truly know that was the case here but the story seems to point that way: The elder victim told the sister about the deal and the sister may have wanted in or had other ideas about what should be done with the cash or just plain wanted it for herself so she got her husband in on the plot and some goons to do the dirty work.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Should have done a bank transfer, I wouldn’t even carry half that amount across town in my country just to deposit it into another bank for someone.

22 ( +23 / -1 )

Horrifying. Did they actually think they could get away with it under those circumstances?

15 ( +17 / -2 )

If there’s one thing I’ve learned in life it’s that money makes people do crazy things, even a relatively small amount like this. I refuse to lend money to family members, unless it’s charity.

13 ( +15 / -2 )

The Philippines has a fairly good banking system. I’m not going to say these women asked for it, but they showed very little common sense carrying such a huge amount of cash.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Wonder how big a bundle 5 million pesos is. the largest common denomination is 1000 pesos so that is 5000 bills, or a hefty shoebox full. I remember having a shoebox of Ghanaian currency which I gave as a wedding gift when I was living in Ghana, USD 700. It was a heavy box. I can't imagine carrying USD 90,000 in cash. We had a fellow come into the city hall in Kanoya the other day and he had a pocketful of 10,000 yen bills, I think about 100 of them. It really worried us, so we gave him an envelope to put them inj so they weren't as obvious. Bank transfers are the way to go, even if the banks charge commissions.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

Large sums of money should never be carried as cash. Even if all goes well you open up the suspicion of some illegal transaction. Money can be wired just about anywhere these days,

On the other hand, I can't blame the victims for not suspecting that their own relative would murder them for that money.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

Absolute evil monster of a woman. She is definitely going to hang for this. Rest in Peace to the poor, innocent victims.

It is up to the Philippine judicial system to decide whether she will hang or not.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Devils come in many shapes and colors.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

There is no capital punishment in the Philippines. Buying properties is still largely cash based, presumably the property they are planning to acquire is from a rural area, far from the capital. Perhaps they carried that large Yen amount to avoid bank fees and the seller doesn't have a bank account, many still doesn't as it is still a developing country.

Regardless of nationality, families can do murder over money or property.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

A Filipino woman has admitted to killing her sister and Japanese niece

strange, in Japan criminal admitted their sins very easily....

no evidence of any acknowledgment whatsoever.

-17 ( +1 / -18 )

anonymouseToday  10:25 am JST

thanks for confirming my thinking!

-12 ( +1 / -13 )

Trying to steal other's money and then she killed them both.

So evil.

I have had money stolen from my bag by Filipino woman while I was sleeping and you cannot trust anyone as majority of them are poor and need money by any means.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

anonymouseToday  10:25 am JST

You are right that crimes are often reported as 'admitted' to in Japan due to the (often forced) confession-based justice system

You are guilty of the biased and mistaken view that all confessions are "forced". Such examples are a minority, particulary as they provide grounds for an appeal or retrial. But you project it to encompass all confesssions Most are simply confessions.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

I have had money stolen from my bag by Filipino woman while I was sleeping and you cannot trust anyone as majority of them are poor and need money by any means.

Well, it depends on the person and on the circumstances. If some rich westerner pays for a woman to come back to his room, he's fair game because he's a player and it's already obvious the woman is willing to cross certain moral lines. That's the usual way money disappears from someone's room.

On the other hand, murdering your own sister and niece... that's depraved.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The whole thing may have been hatched by the husband.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It's not biassed it's perfectly accurate to say that a high proportion of convictions in Japan are based on some level of forced conviction. Given the way the system is set up, I'm sorry to say it is unavoidable.

It's true. But the other side of it is that they also won't bring a trial forth unless they are absolutely certain they can gain a conviction, which is the other way they keep their conviction rate high.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

No system is perfect but Japan's justice system needs radical reform.

People who talk about Japan's 99% conviction rate are usually unaware that the USA federal courts have a rate almost as high. And, worse, most of those cases never go to any real trial but are instead settled by a plea bargain. Many innocent people plead out rather than face the likelihood of getting a much worse prison sentence after a trial they will most likely lose. Justice systems are awful in many countries.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

As pointed out the US justice system is based on the tens of thousands of daily plea deals.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

The US rate is not as high as Japan's.

The US and Japan have very different justice systems and are equally bad but in different ways.

Conviction rates by nation (they vary a bit year to year)

Japan - 99.8%

China - 99.9%

US - 80 - 85%

Your figures are wrong, or perhaps they combine federal and state courts. The US conviction rate for federal crimes that are prosecuted is 99.6% Yes, lower than Japan - by a hair.

https://www.pewresearch.org/short-reads/2023/06/14/fewer-than-1-of-defendants-in-federal-criminal-cases-were-acquitted-in-2022/

5 ( +7 / -2 )

@anonymouse In Japan a confession is not enough to secure a conviction!

Article 38 of the Japanese Constitution states:

No person shall be compelled to testify against himself.

Confession made under compulsion, torture or threat, or after prolonged arrest or detention shall not be admitted in evidence.

No person shall be convicted or punished in cases where the only proof against him is his own confession.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

anonymouseToday 03:00 pm JST

We don't always have to compare the US with Japan though, do we? It's hardly the bastion of justice - it's terrible in so many ways.

Note for the guy you are replying to, whataboutism with the US is his only method. Nevermind the fact that federal crimes are a special type that may be very hard to get away with.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

The crime happened in the  Philippines, not in Japan.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

What a beautiful young lady with a bright future bringing investment to the Philippines.

Wallace, are you really saying something so obvious? It involved the murder of a Japanese citizen.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Wallace, are you really saying something so obvious? It involved the murder of a Japanese citizen.

The crime happened in the Philippines and will be tried there and not in Japan nor is the crime connected in any way to the Japanese justice system even if one poster likes to take his comments there.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

mountainpearToday 03:17 pm JST

Confession made under compulsion, torture or threat, or after prolonged arrest or detention shall not be admitted in evidence.

Now they just need to make it so a lawyer can be demanded pre-interview. That would solve a lot of problems as the lawyer isn't going to put up with 24 hour interview BS.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Note for the guy you are replying to, whataboutism with the US is his only method. Nevermind the fact that federal crimes are a special type that may be very hard to get away with.

Happy to see people picking up on this "but federal courts in the US have the same guilty rate as Japanese courts" sleight-of-hand that I seem to be seeing more often on the internet lately. Only a tiny fraction of US cases are tried in federal court -- nothing that the average person would be picked up by the police off the street for (even murder, which is generally tried at the state level) -- and they should not be compared to the Japanese justice system as a whole. The vast majority of US crimes are judged in state and municipal courts, which have the ratios others have cited.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

The vast majority of US crimes are judged in state and municipal courts, which have the ratios others have cited.

You are excessively minimizing the number of people charged with federal crimes, but let's run with what you said anyway. It's a good thing that the other courts convict less, but not so good when you consider the chances of the average person being arrested and prosecuted in the US is at least 20 or 30 times greater than in Japan. They arrest people willy-nilly over there, like it's no big deal. Would you rather live in a country where almost half of all males can expect to be arrested at least once or in one where arrest is highly uncommon? No need to worry about conviction rates when you are far less likely to be arrested in the first place.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Please refrain from this inane obsession with the US and comparing it with Japan.

> As Wallace correctly pointed out this has nothing to do with the news story.

I also pointed out the crime was not committed in Japan and has no connection to the Japanese justice system. The trial and the sentencing will happen in the Philippines.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

anonymouseToday  06:55 pm JST

Please refrain from this inane obsession with the US and comparing it with Japan.

As Wallace correctly pointed out this has nothing to do with the news story.

YOU are the one who started a speech about the Japanese justice system when the article is about a crime commited in the Phillipines and will be tried under Phillipine law.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

You are excessively minimizing the number of people charged with federal crimes, but let's run with what you said anyway. 

No, I'm really not; the number is tiny compared to other courts:

An American lawyer answers the question on Quora: https://qr.ae/psrCgT As of 2014, 75 million cases heard in courts in the US; of which, 400,000 are in federal court. "Tiny fraction" is absolutely the right phrase.

Would you rather live in a country where almost half of all males can expect to be arrested at least once or in one where arrest is highly uncommon? No need to worry about conviction rates when you are far less likely to be arrested in the first place.

If this is your argument, why bring up the statistical blip that is US federal courts? Very few of those far-too-many arrestees are dealing with the federal court system, which is totally irrelevant to these men.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Unfortunately, this is happening in Japan family member taking out family members either over money and or they are troublesome. Carrying large amounts of cash is always a risk and more so for women, however, I am sure this woman clearly believed she could have trust in her sister for the safety of her daughter and herself.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Bring her to Japan and send her to good old gallows!!!..

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

commanteerMar. 18 06:32 pm JST

Would you rather live in a country where almost half of all males can expect to be arrested at least once or in one where arrest is highly uncommon?

I would rather live in a country where the justice system is easily navigable with bail and lawyers.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Why cash, was the money "dirty"?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why the photo ?

They aren't missing

They were found murdered !

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I would rather live in a country where the justice system is easily navigable with bail and lawyers.

You mean the corrupt USA ?

Easily manipulated .

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

would rather live in a country where the justice system is easily navigable with bail and lawyers.

usa corrupt lol

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Mr GoodmanMar. 19 07:03 am JST

Jorgey GeorgiosToday 02:36 am JST

Stunning and compelling arguments.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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