crime

Fish illegally caught by yakuza sold at Nagasaki sashimi eatery

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Damn, someone didn't get their envelope in a timely manner! I get the cops going after Yakuza, but this had to be one long investigation, to be able to realize they were making that much money!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I never knew yakuza were into fishing. That is completely different from my image of yakuza.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

Wait a minute, "annual sales reached 300 million yen" @ "500 yen seafood domburi (rice bowl)" that works out to 600,000 bowls annually or 69 bowls per hour for the entire year. Does this seem a little fishy (pardon the pun) to anyone else? I think perhaps something else was being sold at this establishment and that could be the reason the police were looking at them......

10 ( +11 / -1 )

more than 80 man en a day, on ¥500 meals?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

No doubt they served a lot more than ¥500 rice bowls. Just more corruption in Japan.

Its kind of ironic to see the restaurant guide at the top of this page, don’t you think?

7 ( +7 / -0 )

I'm guessing some sharks were involved in this.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

From what I know of fisherman in Japan, I am not that surprised...

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The restaurant looks like a money laundering operation.

The illegal fishing is to cut corners to increase profits.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

No middle men cuts the price.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Will 'Beat' Takashi or Takashi Miike make movie about this?

But at least they're doing business than horrifying crimes like domestic violence.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

donno, i am kinda impressed they were doing the whole diving and fishing bit...

why was it poaching? because they didnt pay some tax?

red sea brim is not under any conservation danger... https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/170167/1286175

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I never knew yakuza were into fishing.

Not that unusual I think. In addition to money laundering, the fringe benefits are that the boats can be used to smuggle people, drugs and other stuff.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Is "poaching" simply fishing without a license? Fishing outside a designated area? How much is a commercial fishing license?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Fisheries in Japan are communal, based ón compacts that go back generations. One cannot fish in these locations without familiar and residential history - don't know what the laws are, or even if there are any - but from my experience, the locals generally overlook day trippers but will vehemently go after anything organized. A Japanese friend of mine who lives in Amakusa will occasionally go out for awabi for his girlfriend, and he'll show them to me as if they were a drug haul.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

oh, thats really strange... , I understand paying some tax ( fishing / hunting) to country.. but thats definitely not any fisherman business what i do in the water unless he paid for it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Reading this I have to wonder if it wouldn't just be easier for the Yakuza to just get normal jobs?

Like even with stuff that can be done legally - fishing! - why do they have to do it in an illegal way? Just because they are Yakuza and they have to do whatever it is they are doing illegally?

Wait a minute, "annual sales reached 300 million yen" @ "500 yen seafood domburi (rice bowl)" that works out to 600,000 bowls annually or 69 bowls per hour for the entire year. Does this seem a little fishy (pardon the pun) to anyone else? I think perhaps something else was being sold at this establishment and that could be the reason the police were looking at them......

Two things:

One, your math is off. The article says they have sales of 30 million, not 300 million Yen. So that would be 6.9 bowls per hour, not 69, which sounds way more realistic.

Second, the bowls aren't the only thing they sell. Likely they are just a teaser menu item to get people in. Probably they make higher margins on other stuff like drinks, etc.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Yakuzas are human beings too, they have to work too. atleast, this is real work and the japanese govT should tell these human beings the right way to do it. Japanese consumers want cheap food and then they complian. Very normal in japan. Cheap & delicious, figure that out.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Nagasaki is that still Yamaguchi-gumi or a schism?

Funnily enough, the founder Yamaguchi Harukichi was a former fisherman and started off with a group of longshoremen.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Funny there's no mention of what's going to happen to either the restaurant or the poachers. My guess is... nothing.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The price is 893 yen.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Ever wondered who takes a cut of the huge tuna auctions. Fishermen can live for a year from some tuna sales.

Considering the vast amounts of money involved, and the secretive limited traditional industry, yakuza would have been taking their cut for generations.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So adult business was not 'illegal funding source but fishing was? What the government think will keep yakuza alive :-) For me it seems they are let to survive on strictly shady business but real work is forbidden for them...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

probably Yakuza realized that fish worth more than drugs in Japan and they can sell it without getting into trouble LUL

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Amazing.  We got yaks driving boats and scuba diving because they can make more money out if fishing than out of their more typical criminal activities.  Either shows that smut/vice/drugs etc are getting cheaper or that fish getting waaaaay more expensive.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If that restaurant ever made a promotional campaign or TV commercial, the jingle would be: "buy our donburi or die!"

That's how they made money.

No drugs, no sex, no robbery.

Just making people eat their food!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Rintaro

Wait a minute, "annual sales reached 300 million yen" @ "500 yen seafood domburi 

30million yen and 300million yen difference is way lot of mistaken nos. of donburis' , don't you think?

You can also buy lots of pairs of eyeglasses with that amount.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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