crime

Former pro baseball player arrested for stealing champagne

21 Comments

Police in Yokohama have arrested a 45-year-old former professional baseball player on suspicion of stealing two bottles of champagne worth 17,500 yen from a store in Akita city in November.

According to police, Hitoshi Ono has admitted to stealing the two bottles from a large retail store on Nov 25, local media reported. Police said Ono was identified after an analysis of store surveillance camera footage.

Ono, who currently lives in Yokohama, played for the Yomiuri Giants and the Osaka Kintetsu Buffaloes. He retired from baseball in 2003. Most recently, he had been working with a company that sells home exercise equipment.

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21 Comments
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Sometimes i don't really agree with how the media plaster the man name and former occupation all over the news. Sure, he stole some items. He will probably pay a a heavy fine and a warning from the police. But by revealing his name all over the country, it basically is a way to ruin someone life completely. How would he ever able to fine a job again? One mistake and their life is ruin which eventually give them so much pressure they suffer from mental health and resort to even bigger crimes in order to survive. Or they end themselves.

I do not think police should reveal any suspect names to media unless it's absolutely necessary.

13 ( +22 / -9 )

@Hiro san.

I agree with you but, don't you think it's a deterrent to prevent future crime?

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Sometimes i don't really agree with how the media plaster the man name and former occupation all over the news. Sure, he stole some items. He will probably pay a a heavy fine and a warning from the police. But by revealing his name all over the country, it basically is a way to ruin someone life completely. How would he ever able to fine a job again? One mistake and their life is ruin which eventually give them so much pressure they suffer from mental health and resort to even bigger crimes in order to survive. Or they end themselves.

When it’s a regular person and a minor crime I agree. In this case it’s a minor crime, but the person in this case is already a public figure. Ono is a former Olympian and at one point was one of the top pitching prospects in Japan. His pro career was mostly a bust, but he did pitch a few seasons for the Giants. I’d say it’s OK to note the occupation and name in cases like that.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Rainyday

Huh? It's ok to ruin people if they used to play to play professional sports?? I don't follow your logic.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

miss_oikawa

he ruined his own life shoplifting.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

If everyone else is named - with the noticeable recent exception of a policeman IIRC - why save this guy who was getting his kicks from shoplifting.

God knows, enough people getting their next meal from shoplifting are named and shamed.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

I like champagne however would not steal it to enjoy the soft bubbles tickling my nose in the hot tub.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

He quit baseball almost 20 years ago. He must have not been that good to retire so young and blew through all his money. And why would anyone steal champagne. If you’re gonna commit a crime, there are much more valuable items to steal.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Rainyday

Huh? It's ok to ruin people if they used to play to play professional sports?? I don't follow your logic.

There are two interests in play here. On the one hand, yes its good to protect people's privacy, but on the other hand there is the public's interest in having access to information about public figures.

Now if its your average person who gets involved in a minor offence (like shoplifting a bottle of wine) I would say that the interest in protecting that person's privacy is more important than the public's right to know, because the public doesn't really have an important interest in knowing about minor stuff like that about Joe Schmoe (it would be different if it was a serious crime like murder of course, where the public would have an interest in knowing that this was a dangerous person).

If its a public figure though I think the public interest in knowing starts to outweigh the privacy interest. Partly this is because celebrities have already given up a lot of their privacy, but also because people have a legitimate right to know what these people are up to. This is especially the case with elected officials (if it was a politician who had stolen the wine, I'd say we'd all really want to know about it), but it also extends to celebrities whose careers are at least in part based on public trust (you might not want to be a fan of a baseball player if you know he is a poor role model, etc).

1 ( +3 / -2 )

He must have not been that good to retire so young and blew through all his money.

He was a late round pick, unsuccessful pitcher and had a short career 20 years ago. He probably didn't make that much money to blow through in the first place.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Because most comments are English. I assume most don’t listen local Japanese radio nor read the local paper. This is where the local crimes of low level citizen are reported. Thus assuming only notable figures names are released. Japan has a very low crime rate. So the system works. I assume the naming of the person and occupation is a tool in their toolbox use for deterrent along with punishment. I am Not saying it is the best but it work very well. Plus there is no complaints from the locals on it country’s Policing.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

agree with Hiro…this isn’t news anywhere except in Japan today smh nobody cares it’s just police fascinated by their arrest and revealing it to media doesn’t deter any new petty crime by anyone who has once made a name for themselves it just destroys their life further—just arrest and release the guy…shows how hungry Japantoday is for views…society is already really depressing hey don’t forget to publish the next petty thief without a name!

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Poverty is rife than we are made to think.

Pro baseball players here usually get on average

80M yen sign on bonus when they are drafted. With interest astronomically low leaving

50M in a bank will earn maybe 1,000yen a month, if not put into a business

or investment that generates income 50M won't last even 10 years.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What is low is that he has no right to defend.

Why he did it ? Prank ? bet ? Kleptomania ? Love ? ...

Did he steal once ?

That should be a journalist job to tell all and give him right to reply.

If Japan's low rate is a good point, it should not be at the expense of privacy and people feeling anguished all the time, where one minor mistake can ruin a life and families. Speaking by experience when you meet people afraid of saying what they think and lacking any initiative by fear of errors.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

My advice is, do not do it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

stealing champagne……..

hardly a necessity for life.

had to look the guy up. Pretty forgettable career, 20 years ago.

while I don’t think he should be put on blast publicly, I do think he should be fined or arrested or whatever the highest extent to his crime is.

get a second or third job like the rest of us, scrub.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

90+ % of sportspersons and celebrities have financial difficulties past their due dates! Only a few can make money through their name after they cross a certain age of 40 or 50. In their prime they can’t manage money well and have hardship later on!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It’s surprising to read the comments here which sort of support the acts of stealing ! STEALING IS A CRIME AND THERE ARE CONSEQUENCES! Shops have a notice pasted on the walls that shoplifters will be named and shamed so if you knowingly shoplift be prepared to face the consequences!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

He wanted to celebrate the taste of championship one more time!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Once you are convicted, your name is on the public record in the court file so there is no way of maintaining privacy. However, before conviction or pleading guilty, the matter should remain private so that the defendant has access to natural justice.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Never steal. Even if you’re a celeb, think before doing something that could ruin your life.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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