crime

Gov't finds 27 suspected illegal bureaucrat job placement cases

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In Japan? Oh my God, say it isn't so!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Gov't finds 27 suspected illegal bureaucrat job placement cases...

... this week?

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Whitewash drivel for the gullible.

Few would believe that the recent crackdown on the education ministry unlawfully arranging post-retirement employment for its officials has ended the corrupt practice of elite bureaucrats landing lucrative jobs at private-sector businesses and organizations that they once supervised. Officials at government ministries and agencies continue to use clever ways to secure post-retirement positions for themselves. A typical example is the police — which hold “reserved seats” for their retired ranks in organizations related to the pachinko industry.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2017/05/30/commentary/japan-commentary/cozy-ties-police-pachinko-industry/#.WUMcFlHraUk

That's from the magazine Sentaku, arguably the best and best-informed in the country. The idea that amakudari is dead is laughable, nobody believes a word of it.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

I am sorry but I don't understand what is so wrong about this. Of course I have heard all the arguments concerning corporations and government officials in bed together and how Amagudari just maintains that status quo.

But, there is another side to the story. Two points:

The Japanese government attracts the best and brightest from its top ranked schools to enter into government service at ridiculously low wages. I have personally known many of these outstanding people. They do their jobs exceedingly well for Japan to include both the people and industry unlike many other places where the government employees are chosen for social policy rather than qualification reasons. Do you not feel that we incur some obligation to help them after they retire to provide for their families?

The way the government is structured, unlike industry, many are forced to retire early. The reasons are many but do not normally include poor performance or illegal activity. Perhaps the primary cause is the pyramid structure of the ministries where only one member of their year class can advance to the top. This is Japanese culture and nothing is wrong with it. The people who must retire early need jobs. They are highly qualified and eager. By Amagudari they benefit both the government and the people.

Is there room for misconduct? Of course, but I would argue that is a very small room.

-13 ( +1 / -14 )

These leaches hide behind the scenes have a huge income including bonus, go out of their way to misinform or flat out lie ranging from loosing documents to selling public land to their superiors at a massive discount. Now they in ignore the law with impunity. Yep I feel sorry for them.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Steppenwolf , how about those in the private sector who retire early and can't find

a job ?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

""We did not find any systematic kind of (law) violations" as seen in the education and science ministry, Kozo Yamamoto, minister in charge of civil service reform, told reporters."

This is the core of the j-society disease, yeah keep playing with your country ..the corruption/nepotism debt will soon bring demise-but their family jewels dont care.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"These leaches hide behind the scenes have a huge income including bonus, go out of their way to misinform or flat out lie ranging from loosing documents to selling public land to their superiors at a massive discount. Now they in ignore the law with impunity"

Perhaps these leaches are also unknowingly perhaps opening a door for perhaps George Soros.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Tip of the iceberg.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Like the documents linking Abe to that vets school project, the ministry did not look very hard to find evidence of cushy jobs for their ex - bureaucrats.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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