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Indonesian man dies while in police custody in Tochigi Prefecture

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But the police thought his condition did not require hospitalization based on medical examinations.

Another one? At least people know where we should avoid in order to stay alive. It doesn't matter whether you are guilty or innocent.

.

Last month one Japanese man died

https://japantoday.com/category/crime/detainee-dies-after-being-found-unconscious-in-cell-in-saitama-prefecture

.

Last year there was female who also died.

https://japantoday.com/category/crime/Female-detainee-dies-after-being-found-unconscious-in-cell

.

Nepalese man died, few year ago

https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2023/03/8de4eccf66db-tokyo-govt-ordered-to-pay-damages-for-death-of-arrested-nepalese-man.html

.

This one in Nagoya

https://japannews.yomiuri.co.jp/society/general-news/20221218-78228/

.

Got pre-existing condition? No exception

https://japantoday.com/category/crime/diabetic-detainee-dies-in-police-custody-after-not-eating-for-3-days-or-being-given-medication

-10 ( +26 / -36 )

Yes it happens. Doesn't help that nearly every prisoner claims they have a "problem" and need to see a doctor.

2 ( +23 / -21 )

No they did not. Are policemen not also professional health care providers or doctors?

is not there a protocol to follow by referring him to a medical doctor and further examination?

They bear responsibility for his death.

30 ( +35 / -5 )

Yes it happens. Doesn't help that nearly every prisoner claims they have a "problem" and need to see a doctor.

It's better to reject all health complain, even one of them may have risk that leading to death.

-16 ( +11 / -27 )

A 26-year-old Indonesian man died Thursday at a hospital while in police custody in Tochigi Prefecture, for allegedly driving without a license, according to police.

For allegedly driving without a license while being a foreigner the penalty is DEATH.

Japan needs a vigorous FLM, Foreign Lives Matter movement.

11 ( +32 / -21 )

“(In custody) Since his arrest in October…”

For driving without a licence??

That is usually dealt with by fine here or if contested someone is usually summonsed to attend court for it.

37 ( +40 / -3 )

I'm confused. This guy was jailed at a police station since October?

The man had been taken to a hospital after a doctor, who was at the Sano Police Station for routine medical examinations

31 ( +31 / -0 )

@AustPaul

In Japan they usually break one single allegation into many allegations, so they can get multiple length custody. Perhaps they found that poor guy not renewing shaken that can be another new allegations or other allegations At the end they manage to increase his custody period.

https://japan.embassy.gov.au/tkyo/arrests.html

-10 ( +16 / -26 )

@ deanzaZZR

I'm confused. This guy was jailed at a police station since October?

That's what happened if someone just don't confess in Japan, they'll try to increase custody period by making new allegations and they can be really creative for other allegations.

-7 ( +20 / -27 )

In custody since October for a driving offense? Most be more to it than that.

24 ( +25 / -1 )

Yet again @sakurasuki gets only downvotes, this time not for expressing an opinion but for facts, supported by credible links.

I know and have met some police here. They are not the kind of people you should trust.

0 ( +23 / -23 )

I guess it’s appropriate to die in police custody as a young man? Sounds like he may have been beaten.

11 ( +17 / -6 )

Why would they deny anyone's request to see a doctor? It's just a power trip, I guess.

When a kid in my English class says can I go to the toilet I just think "Yay! 5 minutes I don't have to do any work" "Off you go son". Who cares if he genuinely needs to go or not? What's the alternative? "No, you will not go. You will stay here until the end of class and you will suffer like all the other toilet-needing kids until I say you can relieve yourself"

9 ( +18 / -9 )

Japan's law, it's rule of law, it's law enforcement agencies (Japan's Ministry of justice in a nutshell) at it's best - yet again.

-8 ( +11 / -19 )

In prison for four months for driving without a license? What? All this time in solitary. Shut up in a 4.5 mat room with not even a chair to sit on, no windows, like a caged animal? That would destroy the will to live.

Much as I love Japan, there is something very wrong with the police system in this country.

3 ( +28 / -25 )

When not showing their "friendly" Koban PR face, Japanese police, like police organizations in all countries, have a dark, sinister side of violence out of sight of the public. Governments of every stripe like it this way, which is why we'll probably never know what really happened to this young Indonesian man, driving while "gaijin" and without a license.

-8 ( +18 / -26 )

810 deaths in custody in Japanese police detention centers in 2021, 391 deaths in custody in 2019, 358 deaths in 2018, and 327 deaths in 2017

The Japanese government stopped releasing numbers in 2021.

17 ( +21 / -4 )

I agree with @u___reamer

Japanese police are not as nice as the old guys or female officers staffing the Kobans seem. I got manhandled by ten officers a few years back. Was in the country side and missed my last train back to Tokyo and drinking a beer in front of the station at 4am. Totally disproportionate response to basically nothing. And don’t try to film them or they will get violent if you don’t put down your phone and threaten you with disturbing the peace bs and bring you to a police station. Anyway, poor guy. So young

-1 ( +18 / -19 )

Won't be a real investigation, either. The police chief said they acted 'appropriately' and that's all you need to know: The guy died. So what?

8 ( +13 / -5 )

Any Indonesians on here I suggest you contact your embassy to urge them to investigate and hopefully a family member of the deceased will contact a Japanese lawyer via the bar association. They will help you find a pro bono lawyer. The only political party I ever felt cared about foreigner rights in Japan is Sokka Gakkai.

7 ( +15 / -8 )

The chief os the police station said that he belives the police had dealt with the situation APPROPRIATELY.

U have been detained the man since october for driving without a license

and deniding him proper medical treatment which cause the man to lose his life

and you call this APPOPRIATE????????

17 ( +20 / -3 )

GaijinjlandToday  10:24 am JST

I agree with @u___reamer

Japanese police are not as nice as the old guys or female officers staffing the Kobans seem. I got manhandled by ten officers a few years back. Was in the country side and missed my last train back to Tokyo and drinking a beer in front of the station at 4am. Totally disproportionate response to basically nothing. And don’t try to film them or they will get violent if you don’t put down your phone and threaten you with disturbing the peace bs and bring you to a police station. Anyway, poor guy. So young

Japan has the infamous and notorious reputation for his police officers,I feel sorry for that guy.

About the comment I paste here I had a similar experience a few years back in Gifu city where I used to work for a while.

It was around 14:00 PM and was on my break,got my onigiri and a fizzy drink from the local convenient store and stopped to a small park sitting on a bench consuming my meal.

Then suddenly a cop in scooter noticed me and stopped to question me,like what are you doing here or why are you here?

He even asked for my ID.

I politely declined and after a while he left.

I am an average caucasian male and I was totally normally dressed.

I guess my only sin was to be an ethical minority in the area.

Japanese police force should stop to racially profile foreigners on the street and most important stop to abuse to people when they are in custody.

2 ( +15 / -13 )

Three months in jail for driving without a license?! Why isn't this discriminatory practice on the news? Japan really needs to stop with this monkey no see, monkey no care attitude.

9 ( +14 / -5 )

Being apprehended by the police is my number one fear living in Japan! And it is everybody's' business because it can happen to anybody!

2 ( +16 / -14 )

A bit excessive to throw someone in Jail for driving without a license.

Should have been a fine and appear in court.

16 ( +17 / -1 )

I am so angry by this story. I worked with Indonesian people in Japan, they are quiet, very polite and very courteous and I am SO SHOCKED that this man lost his life for what???? Over the lack of a piece of paper, there is no indication he was in Japan illegally and so shame on the police. Prayers and sympathy to this young man's family and the entire Indonesian community in Japan.

18 ( +18 / -0 )

Yoshinori Mimori, chief of the police station, said he believes the police had dealt with the situation "appropriately."

straight off the bat, the guy has just died in your custody. In what universe can you say that you dealt with the situation appropriately? He was 26 years old and is now dead. The statement says everything we need to know about their mindset which will be cruel, cold and lacking basic empathy and humanity. Protect and serve ay? Just don’t be the wrong nationality. Another blatant in your face disgrace.

16 ( +16 / -0 )

AustPaul

Today 07:21 am JST

“(In custody) Since his arrest in October…”

> For driving without a licence??

> That is usually dealt with by fine here or if contested someone is usually summonsed to attend court for it

Well yes and no!

The thing many foreigners need to understand is Japanese laws are not the same as in the West!

In theory all violations of the road laws is a "criminal" offence, the way the government gets around this fact is if you pay the fine promptly then no actual charges are filled and it sort of vanishes!

The caveat is foreigners especially those without a valid driver's licence!

In such a case no fine can be issued and it automatically becomes a "criminal" offence which by the mere fact of being charged causes either and instant suspension or revocation of ones visa.

This is also why lawyers do not recommend foreigners challenge a ticket in court.

If you lose then it becomes a "criminal" conviction and you risk losing your Visa or right to remain in Japan.

My ex brother in law is a Japanese lawyer and explained all this to me when I wanted to contest a ticket many years ago in one of these traps at a construction site (20 cars all stopped like me) he pointed out the way it is set up, no one dares contest because even the Japanese end up with a theoretical "criminal conviction" if they lose.

Seeing this man was on a Visa and had no legal driver's licence they couldn't just give him a fine and let him go.

More likely he was referred directly to a prosecutor who decided to file charges.

Yes it is speculation on my part but unless my ex brother in law is incorrect which being a Japanese lawyer I doubt it, then be aware a traffic stop in Japan for a foreigner can become a major situation and problem.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Others have said it already, but someone arrested on a simple driving without a license charge in October, should not still be in custody in late January. Questions need answering and all these deaths need to stop.

If foreigners dying in custody makes the news because they're foreigners, how many Japanese are dying in custody? Oh that's right, they don't release the data anymore! The media should be all over this and senior government officials (ie, the PM) should be answering the hard questions.

Length of time in custody aside, when you're in the care of the state, it's their duty to care for you. You shouldn't die.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

Is it normal to drive in Tochigi prefecture? It's a suburb of Tokyo but really far away. Usually foreigners do not drive in Japan and Tokyoites also do not drive.

I've rarely heard of Indonesians committing crimes, but they also tend to work in very low income industries such as maids or cleaning. Vietnamese and Filipinos tend to be much more harshly tarnished IMO. Chinese can go both ways and Koreans tend to lean positive.

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

Is it normal to drive in Tochigi prefecture?

Are you serious!? It's normal to drive anywhere.

Usually foreigners do not drive in Japan and Tokyoites also do not drive.

Are you kidding me? Most of the foreigners I know all have cars and drive here. And there are a LOT of people in Tokyo with cars.

I've rarely heard of Indonesians committing crimes, but they also tend to work in very low income industries such as maids or cleaning.

If you're suggesting not many of the "trainee" workers from South East Asia have cars, you're probably right. The fact they're young and have low income would reduce car ownership.

However if they're working on farms or in the countryside they may have access to work vehicles.

For example, perhaps a trainee was asked to go and get something in a work kei-truck, for example, but didn't have a license. Maybe they felt pressured to go, regardless of not having a license. Now we're guessing, but it's certainly weird to suggest that a foreigner driving in Tochigi is not normal.

I've rarely heard of Indonesians committing crimes

As far as crimes go, driving without a license is pretty minor. Chances are they had a license back home and know how to drive, so it's essentially missing paperwork. It's not like robbing a bank, theft, or assault.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

I've never met a foreigner who drives. I've met some western university professors who were very old and also do not drive. I understand if you live in Nagoya or a rural place that you want a car, but not in a place as dense as Tokyo.

-16 ( +0 / -16 )

I've never met a foreigner who drives. I've met some western university professors who were very old and also do not drive. I understand if you live in Nagoya or a rural place that you want a car, but not in a place as dense as Tokyo.

If you live in the middle of Tokyo, you might not/want a car. But Tochigi the countryside. Car ownership will be much more common out there.

I'm 37 living in Kobe, which is much more "city" than Tochigi. Of my 10 closest foreign friends (my age or slightly older), only 2 don't own a car.

50% of my students come to school by car. The others are within walking distance, but most of their parents have cars.

Anyway, chances are this poor guy was driving a work car, possibly pressured into driving it even though he didn't have a Japanese license.

My point is, you can't say a foreigner driving is strange.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Villanova

I've never met a foreigner who drives. 

Really. More foreigners drive than not.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

I've never met a foreigner who drives.

I drive. A few of my 外国人 colleagues drive too.

Got my license in Japan for a manual car. The Japanese way of learning to drive is excellent.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

I presume you lot must live outside Tokyo. I'm talking about driving in the Greater Tokyo Area. The Indonesian was living in Tochigi, a suburb on the northern edge of Saitama, which means it is part of Tokyo world but still far enough that a car might be required.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

And generally my presumption is that most foreigners would not go to the hassle of getting a Japanese license and/or are too low income and/or live in an urban area.

The foreigners who do tend to have cars tend to be more established in Japan probably

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I presume you lot must live outside Tokyo. 

Nope. Tokyo dweller I be.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Tochigi, a suburb on the northern edge of Saitama, which means it is part of Tokyo world but still far enough that a car might be required.

Tochigi is part of Kanto but not Tokyo.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kantō_region

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Back on topic please.

the police probably killed him, Indonesia has to sue JAPAN

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

police had dealt with the situation "appropriately."

OMG. police seem to celebrate the event and felicitate themselves...

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Wait. This guy was under arrest from October??

Can we have the full story here please JT? It's impossible that those were the only allegations.

And how come the Chief of Police have the audacity to callously say that everything was done, was apropiate!?

6 ( +6 / -0 )

DanteKHToday  06:04 pm JST

Only the police version of the story will remain.

Wake up before it is too late...

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Why impossible? Will they let him go without paying a fine at least?

Seems no one to help him

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Villanova

Usually foreigners do not drive in Japan

I drove during each of my 20 visits to Japan using an IDP. And, from day one after moving here, using an IDP, then a Japan license.

Most tourists may not drive here. But, I'll bet a lot of foreigners on student, work, or family visas drive.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I'm wondering though how he was apprehended in the first place.

Arrested for driving without license, not for a driving related violation that led to discovery of no license

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I should have clarified. I was manhandled by ten cops in Tochigi in a nowhere mountain town north of Utsunomiya.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

ian

Today 07:11 pm JST

I'm wondering though how he was apprehended in the first place.

> Arrested for driving without license, not for a driving related violation that led to discovery of no license

Well as someone that drives a lot due to my work, I can venture a guess!

Depending on his "looks" (does he clearly look like a non Japanese) it usually goes something like this!:

Police:

"Car (make model colour license plate) please pull over"

Now depending on if the police are local of national the next thing varies (note cops with automatic hand guns, pants tucked in boots are usually not local police but national, revolver with pants over boot usually local city cops) if stopped by local police the following is said:

" your driver's license please! Is your "winker" (AKA turn signal) working" (this seems to be a rehearsed line they all use when you haven't done anything wrong).

If they are the national police it goes like this:

" your Alien registration card please, is your "winker" working?"

It doesn't matter if you haven't changed lanes or turned a corner the "is your winker working " is what is used 99% of the time in my experience!

Now eventually the national police will ask for your driver's licence once they have checked your Alien registration card information!

Now the next thing, in most cases the local police will just check your license and ask you to test your turn signal, all OK and usually they return your license and you leave. Don't ask why don't make a big deal out of it or you will get what happens in the National police stop.

If they are the national police, things go a bit different, after checking your Alien registration card and driver's license, they to will ask to see your turn signals working, but it usually doesn't end there, next they will act all nice but don't be fooled what comes next is not a "request ".

National police officer:

" may we check inside your car?" Again this is not a request they really mean we are going to search your car like it or not!

The will look through your bags if you have any may even have you empty your pockets!

I play along and it is all over quite quickly.

Stay calm and take it, one time I was with my wife (the car officially is hers ) and she got upset with the national police officers, what would have taken 5 minutes took 30 as their supervisor ended up being called and arguments broke out!

That was her first experience being with me and seeing what I had been telling her goes on.

If you "look" foreign, there is a good chance of being stopped for no reason especially in rural areas where it is rare to see visibly non Japanese driving around!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Villanova

Today 04:55 pm JST

And generally my presumption is that most foreigners would not go to the hassle of getting a Japanese license and/or are too low income and/or live in an urban area.

> The foreigners who do tend to have cars tend to be more established in Japan probably

What are you talking about?

Most long term foreigners I know have obtained a Japanese driver's license.

I am talking about in Tokyo and surrounding areas, most of the African, Persian, Chinese often work in manual labour jobs like construction that often require a driver's license!

In many cases the following country only need to apply with a valid license from their country with an official translation to get their Japanese license no test or hassle involved.

Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, United Kingdom, and the following USA states Hawaii, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia and Washington.

I sometimes wonder where people get some of their strange ideas.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Suspects in criminal cases may be detained on a single indictable offense for up to 23 days while the prosecution builds its case. No charges filed in addition to the original have been reported, so the reason for the lengthy detention is mystifying. For Japanese coverage of the story:

https://www3.nhk.or.jp/lnews/utsunomiya/20240125/1090016714.html

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@AntiqueSaving All the Chinese and Koreans here usually use public transport and they work in a wide spectrum of jobs (and both are very materialistic cultures). A lot of the Indians I know work in high paying jobs such as IT or medicine but still use public transport. The vast majority of Tokyoites use public transport so why would foreigners be any different?

I don't know any Arabs or Persians but I will accept your word, and the only Africans that I know are the ones that approach you on the street to sell you something and I doubt they drive.

I guess it is a Tokyo thing to not drive a car.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

"The nail that sticks out gets hammered down." Don't be the one sick in jail in Japan or else you'll get the "shut up and sit back down" treatment.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Who knows why this man was driving. It is not stated here. It doesn't matter. The fact is that he was imprisoned for three months and died in his cell. He hadn't caused any damage. He hadn't killed any one. He hadn't stolen anything. He just didn't have a license. Certainly this requires some kind of punishment. But the punishment should fit the crime. The one who really deserves punishment in this case is the police chief who considers this action "appropriate!"

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Gaijinland

Japanese police are not as nice as the old guys or female officers staffing the Kobans seem. I got manhandled by ten officers a few years back. Was in the country side and missed my last train back to Tokyo and drinking a beer in front of the station at 4am. Totally disproportionate response to basically nothing. And don’t try to film them or they will get violent if you don’t put down your phone and threaten you with disturbing the peace bs and bring you to a police station. Anyway, poor guy. So young

Seeing many social media post in Japan there are so many such posts, filming your encounter is not something that automatically illegal. In fact it can be used to protect you when they charge you with bogus allegations. They may yell and threat you but that's only coercion tactics.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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