crime

Intoxicated student illegally enters grounds of Uniqlo president's home

33 Comments

An intoxicated student illegally entered the grounds of the home of Uniqlo group president Tadashi Yanai on the morning of Nov 10, police said Tuesday.

The 24-year-old man was arrested by police for climbing over the boundary wall of the Shibuya property belonging to Yanai, founder and president of Fast Retailing, of which Uniqlo is a subsidiary, TV Asahi reported.

During police questioning, the man was quoted by police as saying that he was drunk and didn't remember a thing.

According to police, he said he was not aware that the property belonged to Yanai, who is ranked 76th richest man in world by Forbes, making him the richest man in Japan with estimated net worth of $6 billion.

The man has since been released without charge, TV Asahi reported.

© Japan Today

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

33 Comments
Login to comment

The man has since been released without charge, TV Asahi reported.

news? yes, just to draw public attention that Mr. Yanai is 76th richest man in the world.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Illegally entering? I believe we call this tresspassing.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

During police questioning, the man was quoted by police as saying that he was drunk and didn’t remember a thing.

Of course he did. Aother case of the "Inebriatus Forgetus" disease. Seems to spreading rapidly lately.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

wow - i was drunk didn`t remember a thing. there really should be laws against public drunkeness, trespassing, puking on trains, destroying property, starting fights, etc. in this country. there is still no shame attatched to being a drunken slob. it is a shame.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

the man was quoted by police as saying that he was drunk and didn’t remember a thing.

That will be my defense if I ever get drunk and break the law, because it always seem to work in this country.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Wrong house numbskull. I told you to hit the CEO of TEPCO. His house is on the right.

6 ( +12 / -5 )

Perhaps this man should get a better security system??

1 ( +2 / -1 )

What do you mean, "get a better security system"? The report says that the intruder climbed over a wall and the police caught him. Maybe a higher wall or some barbed wire would help but it has nothing to do with his security system.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

He has great security. And a helluva wall. It looked like someone was starting a pyramid when it was being built. I lived a block away at that time. And I've got to say, it is an inviting looking challenge for anyone who likes to climb.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Did he want to get a job interview?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Serious question - is this illegal? Under what law?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Maybe he just needed some clothes.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

ahhh yes in Japan you can get away with anything by saying you were drunk and you dont remember.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Wow, this guy managed to do this drunk. Imagine what he could have achieved sober.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I'm not sure about the severity, but yes, trespassing is usually illegal.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If it is really such a high wall and he was drunk enough to not even remember - they should punish him with a permanent position in one of these sadistic game shows.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Community service.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Illegally entered and when he realized where he is, he illegally left the premises.

Also, how can someone, being drunk to the extent of amnesia, capable of climbing over the boundary wall without falling and breaking his neck?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It's not that serious; it's not like the dude took a leak on Yanai's house or anything.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

ahhh yes in Japan you can get away with anything by saying you were drunk and you dont remember.

Are you saying that the young man in this case should have faced charges or are you thinking of another case where somebody successfully used intoxication as a legal defense to an even remotely serious crime? I've seen it offered as an excuse/reason that people give for illegal activity but do you have any evidence to suggest it actually works?

wow - i was drunk didn`t remember a thing. there really should be laws against public drunkeness, trespassing, puking on trains, destroying property, starting fights, etc. in this country. there is still no shame attatched to being a drunken slob. it is a shame.

There are actually laws against pretty much all of these things are there not? Maybe not puking on trains but then that isn't always due to being drunk. There are certainly laws against violence, vandalism and indeed trespassing, hence why the young man was arrested here.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This Uniqlo dude needs better security ASAP!!

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

"Serious question - is this illegal? Under what law?"

The related laws seems to be in Chapter 12, Article 130: "Breaking into a Residence" of the Japanese Penal Code

http://www.japaneselawtranslation.go.jp/law/detail/?ft=2&re=02&dn=1&yo=penal+code&x=0&y=0&ky=&page=1

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Obviously his security isn't all that good if a drunk can can figure it out!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The related laws seems to be in Chapter 12, Article 130: "Breaking into a Residence" of the Japanese Penal Code

Climbing a wall doesn't usually count as breaking and entering (no force implied). Of course the translation and interpretation of such terms might be subtly different in Japan.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I am sure they got nailed on "trespassing" and not "breaking and entering".

Very different charges and known to anyone that bothers to read a law-book. Most criminals are better informed on the law than most cops and lawyers.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It''S Me and Japan_Cynic,

The actual word employed in the Japanese is shinnyuu, which can alternatively be translated as "invasion," "incursion," "trespass," and yes, "forcible entry." All of which suggest trespass of any sort, forced or otherwise being covered by this law. Why the translator opted to go for the decidedly more specific "breaking into . . . ." variation is beyond me.

If you know of a more concise law in the Japanese that differentiates between forced entry versus simply walking into an unauthorized area, please do share, but I believe this is the only one that applies.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Maybe he wanted to take a dump on his lawn.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Are you saying that the young man in this case should have faced charges or are you thinking of another case where somebody successfully used intoxication as a legal defense to an even remotely serious crime? I've seen it offered as an excuse/reason that people give for illegal activity but do you have any evidence to suggest it actually works?

Yes and yes. Saying "sorry I was drunk" is not an excuse, you got drunk, you are responsible for you actions while drunk, getting drunk isn't a free pass to go and do whatever you want. I would mention several other articles but the mod would remove my post.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Illegally entering? I believe we call this tresspassing

There might be some legal nuance between wandering onto property and intentionally thwarting security such as walls and gates.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The "vote everything down on the site" trolls are out in full force.

Not to worry, Gogogo, I upvoted you for your choice of inconography.

I also happen to agree with your comments.
0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Nessie: I'm not even an old fart but yet but some stuff still amazes me.

So anyone in Japan can get drunk (or claim so) break into a store, stealing some stuff and if you get caught just say "I am drunk".

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Yes and yes. Saying "sorry I was drunk" is not an excuse, you got drunk, you are responsible for you actions while drunk, getting drunk isn't a free pass to go and do whatever you want. I would mention several other articles but the mod would remove my post.

Who is saying that drunkenness is a free pass to do whatever you want? Not me certainly. The article doesn't say that he was released because he was drunk. They say that he was drunk and didn't remember a thing, and then at the end that he was released without charge. I'm no expert on the Japanese legal system but I had assumed that he wasn't charged because it was a very minor offense in which nobody was harmed and the police determined that he didn't have any malicious intention.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So alcohol can encourage a person to perform illegal acts

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites