crime

Court upholds jail sentences for 2 Americans over Ghosn escape

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So will Ghosn help the Taylors?

I don't think so, he is free and laughing he could find two idiot who helped him. Anyway when is Ghosn publishing the documents stating he is innocent? He said he would do but so far only blablabla from him.

-9 ( +16 / -25 )

Court upholds jail sentences for 2 Americans over Ghosn escape

Of course. Japanese (so-called) courts are jusr rubber stamping sessions.

Anyway when is Ghosn publishing the documents stating he is innocent? He said he would do but so far only blablabla from him.

What blablabla from him. Like the first part of the comment says, when will the documents be published.

Incidently, Japan has not paid Mr. Ghosn compensation for unlawful detention, as recommended by the UN.

9 ( +23 / -14 )

Ghosn, now an international fugitive in Lebanon, 

A free innocent man in Lebanon

10 ( +24 / -14 )

Just a ‘tweak‘ to reveal the actual truth:

JCourt ‘holds up‘ 2 Americans over Ghosn’s escape” -

They were ‘easy pickings’ compared to getting Ghosn back from Lebanon.

9 ( +17 / -8 )

That much money from Ghosn for just 2years in jail in japan? That's a steal.

11 ( +15 / -4 )

After the dust has settled, prosecutors have spent more time more money than Ghosn was perhaps going to be paid in the future. So it’s only fair the prosecutors after their continued failure to actually come close to a professional investigation are able to jail someone, anyone. There is nothing like a witch hunt based on a secret internal report that couldn’t be used in a court because it contained nothing that could be used in court.

13 ( +18 / -5 )

Free the Taylors!!!

-1 ( +12 / -13 )

@CrickyToday  08:13 am JST

For many petty crimes, the cost to prosecute and imprison is likely more than what the crim stole. Is that an excuse to not punish them?

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Excellent, Japanese justice working, although judge should increase their time in prison for having helped a coward criminal escape..

Dear Ghosnbelievers, a criminal is a criminal no matter if wear a white shirt and tie and whoever helps a criminal to escape from the law is also a criminal never a hero..

Free the Taylors!!!

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSKzKKAA26MiGhOw8Dhu6ij_uOoCxbQtLrE8fgihuCfbPjRmVySBxO3OvIYcsXbBnt1p5Q&usqp=CAU

-15 ( +5 / -20 )

Cangaroo court system... disappointing.

3 ( +11 / -8 )

Yes, upholds. It's just to keep the courts here from looking medieval abroad. It is certain from the beginning that they will be convicted and they know in advance what the punishment will be (the prosecutor). Japan has a huge debt and it is growing. So maybe we should get rid of the courts altogether, stop the pretence. We all know that the prosecutor has the final say here, that the prosecutor is above the court and the judges, and that "hostage justice" and virtually forced confessions are the main.

We would have saved a huge amount of money on this judicial sham. If someone has to prove their innocence, if the court doesn't have to prove guilt and intent, if someone is automatically guilty, then a trial is meaningless and a waste of money.

In the DPRK or China, for example, the judicial system is also a farce, but one knows straight away that one will simply be sentenced to the maximum possible punishment. Here, in Japan, the judicial system is more like a theatre and a bargaining at a meddieval market.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

"he did not believe he would receive a fair trial."

he and how many others?

2 ( +7 / -5 )

@Robert CikkiToday 01:57 pm JST

First, it was upheld because the Taylors didn't file an appeal within the designated time.

Second, they didn't appeal it because there was nothing intelligent they could say given the circumstances. They laid out their (nonexistent) cards back in the US, where they were rebuffed. When they got to Japan, they still thought they had cards, but the lawyers must have convinced them otherwise.

That's all there is to it.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Dear Ghosnbelievers, a criminal is a criminal no matter if wear a white shirt and tie and whoever helps a criminal to escape from the law is also a criminal never a hero..

How is Mr. Ghosn a criminal, when he has not even had a trail. Oooops! I forgot, because the prosecutor says so.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Alan Harrison: trial and trail are not one and the same.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Incidently, Japan has not paid Mr. Ghosn compensation for unlawful detention, as recommended by the UN.

UN, Yeah, isn't it always so convenient umbrella ? Hope UN will say something about the guys who had released the one from unlawful detention

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Good.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@Kazuaki,

First, it was upheld because the Taylors didn't file an appeal within the designated time.

Second, they didn't appeal it because there was nothing intelligent they could say given the circumstances. They laid out their (nonexistent) cards back in the US, where they were rebuffed. When they got to Japan, they still thought they had cards, but the lawyers must have convinced them otherwise.

That's all there is to it.

No, the third reason is that time spent incarcerated while waiting for the results of an appeal to the high court does not count against the sentence - in other words, appealing the sentence keeps you in jail but your sentence does not begin to run until final judgment. So if your chances of winning an appeal are low, you make the calculation whether there is anything to gain as compared to the months or years you may lose.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Probably a wise move not to appeal. Japan would only want exhorbitant money in exchange for a suspended sentence. Japan wanted them back, let the Japanese tax payer pay for them.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

The two Americans may have chance to go out earlier before full prison term if they are really good prison in there.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Alan HarrisonJuly 30 04:09 pm JST

How is Mr. Ghosn a criminal, when he has not even had a trail. Oooops! I forgot, because the prosecutor says so.

To skip bail makes you automatically a criminal, and to move to abroad an international fugitive and not only in Japan.

For example ask Julian Assange in London....about Ecuador...

Same in USA, under state and federal law failing to appear in court after bailing out of jail is its own crime.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

To skip bail makes you automatically a criminal, and to move to abroad an international fugitive and not only in Japan.

It would seem that in Japan, an arrest automatically makes a person a criminal. As for Mr.Ghosn being an international fugitive, Lebonan don't seem to agree. Like I have already commented, Japan owes compensation to Mr. Ghosn, for unlawful detention.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

a criminal is a criminal*

And a suspect is a suspect. Learn the difference.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

A Tokyo court has upheld jail sentences for a U.S. father-son duo who helped ex-Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn flee Japan, as the pair waived their right to appeal.

This news is pointless. The headline makes it look like they are appealing.

@Kazuaki

When they got to Japan, they still thought they had cards, but the lawyers must have convinced them otherwise.

Now you can also read minds?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@justaskingToday 02:08 pm JST

Like all other people, I can only infer it by their actions, as you might notice by the word "must", which indicates an inference. However, the fact they did not admit to guilt immediately on landing, or even as soon as they realize they are going to be sent to Japan, points to this conclusion.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Kazuaki ShimazakiJuly 30 04:08 pm JST

@Robert CikkiToday 01:57 pm JST

First, it was upheld because the Taylors didn't file an appeal within the designated time.

Second, they didn't appeal it because there was nothing intelligent they could say given the circumstances. They laid out their (nonexistent) cards back in the US, where they were rebuffed. When they got to Japan, they still thought they had cards, but the lawyers must have convinced them otherwise.

That's all there is to it.

Look, I understand your argumentative fallacies. It's just that it's all secondary. The first point is that they're just guilty by default, even without a trial. They were held in custody until the trial. Even when they were transported from the US to Japan they were treated as criminal elements and automatically guilty of something.

Look, I'm not disputing their guilt or innocence. I'm not disputing whether or not they did what they're accused of doing. I'm not disputing whether or not what they did was against the law. In a civilized country, or in a country with a civilized judicial system, this is up to the judge. And not the prosecutor or anyone else.

And you keep using the term "admit to being guilty". This is a term from the Middle Ages. And the possible reduced sentence for pleading guilty is also absurd. This is exactly "hostage justice".

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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