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Japan looking at steps against cyber-bullying after death of 'Terrace House' cast member

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So they only take action after a celebrity is affected, that seems fair.

11 ( +16 / -5 )

So they only take action after a celebrity is affected, that seems fair.

Precisely what I was going to say. Bullying has been going on for ages, and NOW they're going to take action? Nice that the Jgov always have the people in their thoughts.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

With all the children who have been victimized by cyber bullying it takes a famous adult's death for government to step up its game!!

Oh and BTW does the third word of the article look familiar?

8 ( +10 / -2 )

The Japanese have a very unforgiving nature. Once you do something here you are tarred with that brush for ever. If you come into work late once you become the person who always comes late to work. Bully here seems to be partly based on this strange mindset, and it makes group opinion seem so stifling and unchangeable. Kimura was angry once on a show and the crowd would have never let her forget it. Similar to Becky and Laura you do something once and there is very little change of coming back from it.

Its going to be difficult if not impossible to change the bullying culture in Japan because of the closed minded, unforgiving group mentality.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

punishments won't be enough, it may deter some but not all. You at least have to seek out the root problem of bullying itself and Japan has a lot of them.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Oh! So THAT’S what it takes!!!!

5 ( +7 / -2 )

So, what the Japanese Government is indicating is they will take a look at steps [ vocabulary again ] towards stopping cyber-bullying as of today? How long has cyber-bullying been around? What does looking at steps actually mean? I look at steps every day. Never do anything. Just, looking at steps.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Burning BushToday  06:46 am JST

So they only take action after a celebrity is affected, that seems fair.

You took the words right from my mind as I was reading this! What about the other kids who committed suicide after dealing with all types of bullying even for their teachers, classmates and others? But a somewhat "celebrity" dies from cyberbullying and all these new laws are in movement. I always say the justice system here favours the rich and famous. All us normies.......

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Studies have shown that "considering", "looking at" and "urging" has proven less effective than "doing". 

Bullying is japanese culture, sempai/kohai, the entertainment industry, mama groups. It's really everywhere. The thing that gets me is everyone acting surprised when things like this happen, run a few "anti-bully CMs, put up a few more posters around schools, pat themselves on the back and repeat the cycle.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

While it’s tragic that she committed suicide, If you don’t want trolling just stop using Twitter etc or don’t read the messages in the first place. Don’t kill yourself. The only thing social media is good for is exploiting people’s insecurity and mental problems. I miss the days of just communicating with someone over the phone.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Cyberbullying is a symptom.

The disease is bullying as a ubiquitous part of Japanese society. If the government truly wants to control cyberbullying, start with the base problem, not a branch.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Yes consider all you like maybe its time to do something...

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Takaichi said the government intends to revise a law "with a sense of speed"

Don't hold your breath.

The only time they've invoked a "sense of speed" was when Viagra was approved. Gotta admire their priorities.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

As other posters point out, yes, more should be done about cyberbulling regardless of this individual case.

Unlike the vast majority of ordinary people who are cyberbullied however, Kimura was a participant on a reality tv show which actively encourages viewers to observe and make judgments about the participants, about their looks, personality, etc. This will be made in comparison to the other participants. who in Terrace House's case just happen to be models. The show was happy to show Kimura in a bad light and then failed to protect her.

Ordinary people who are cyberbullied are not in an attention-seeking situation and deserve much stronger protection.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Still going to be tricky to enforce; If one person on facebook or twitter says I look ugly one time, is that enough to claim harassment? If 300 people do the same thing at the same time is that harassment? And then how do you legally hold 300 users responsible for the comment? With the legal process already so slow, do we really want to fill courts up with defamation lawsuits over hurt feelings?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Unfortunately that is the way things operate here. Death is the proof, that measures aren’t an overreaction. A victim’s death led to Anti-Stalking laws and another victim dying to start discussion on laws on bullying. In Takahashi Matsuri’s case, the overworked women of Dentsu, even death does not lead to much change.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Ah, it's "considering" again, which means after about 50 more dead children or young adults they'll form a panel, then 100 more bodies and they'll consider legislation, and after another 500 they'll just quietly ask for cooperation and understanding, then when it reaches 1000 more they'll say this could never have been predicted and they're considering thinking about it.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

"Disclosing information on senders could suppress the freedom of expression and secrecy of communications guaranteed by the Constitution," said Yohei Shimizu, a lawyer who has handled numerous online-related cases.

Shimizu said there is a need for well-balanced discussion in crafting the new scheme while carefully weighing whether there could be a human rights violation.

There needs to be protections because otherwise e.g. politicians could just say things like "They were mean to me, I'm so offended!"

Criminal acts would understandably rescind an individual's rights to privacy in line with other types of police investigations.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Nothing will change unless that change makes the gov money.

When profit is the name of the game, if you don't make money, you don't matter. If ratings fall because of cyberbullying, bullying people into stopping it is the same thing.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Regardless of opinions on being online, thick-skinned or not, I'm aghast that some have no empathy for anyone that arrives (however they get there) at a point where suicide seems even like an option.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Celebs in other countries get bullied too online, comedians get heckled, even athletes get booed and called all sorts of names. For some, it motivates them or they just ignore it, others take it deeply personal and they become depressed. Even someone like Jussie Smollett doesn't deserve to be bullied online, but it happens. Even the news media attacked him. Why is it ok for some but not others?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

On the one hand, as a professional wrestler, the producers of Terrace House may have thought she could handle the abuse so often received by even minor celebrities. On the other hand, was any support readily available? Its not like they didn't know such abuse happens. Did they prepare at all?

What's more, reality TV ISN'T. The entire event may have been orchestrated by the makers of the show, even to the point of sneaking her garment into the washing machine to be rewashed improperly by the co-star of the show. Or they may have scripted her reaction. Its unlikely we will get the truth as they have such influence they got the press to obfuscate her obvious suicide when the news first broke by merely saying she "died" and not even say "suicide" at all. It took the press until the next day to state the obvious.

Point is, the makers of the show need to have their feet held to the flames. Cyberbullying cannot be ended, but makers of fake shows who do everything they can think of to rile up the public for views and clicks need to be reined in.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

to simplify procedures to identify individuals who make defamatory posts online,

I dont really know what to say about that. Ive had Japanese say some pretty despicable things to me, even been assaulted while walking and being a gaijin; that was my offense. No authority or "friend" ever helped me out. An online post? its just type; you cant see the "offender" so how could you attach any feelings to it?

If your getting caught up in that back and forth drama, its not time to waste tax money chasing the offender down, its time for you to put down the phone and go get a life.

DIY and hard core hobbies are unfortunately discouraged in Japan, but who cares. Find one, go hard at it or go live in another country etc. The occasional online debate etc is healthy and fun but to worry about what somebody online thinks about you, after you become a celebrity..you took the risk and that mess comes with it.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Whatever happened to:

you: "Your ugly"

me: "and?, so are you"

why internalize it?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Its going to be difficult if not impossible to change the bullying culture in Japan because of the closed minded, unforgiving group mentality.

Yes thats very true and one of the many reasons why I suggest anybody thinking over becoming a Japanese to rethink it. I dont care if they label or ostracize me, but once your on the other side of the fence, you have to care, its part of the culture.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

you know, if you're being bullied online, the best thing to do is...not be online. you don't need to create any special task force to deal with this "problem" because the solution is so simple it beggars belief. i have no sympathy for anyone who takes their own life because they are glued to twitter and actually care about what a stranger says about them. smgdfh twice.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

you know, if you're being bullied online, the best thing to do is...not be online. you don't need to create any special task force to deal with this "problem" because the solution is so simple it beggars belief. i have no sympathy for anyone who takes their own life because they are glued to twitter and actually care about what a stranger says about them. smgdfh twice.

Well said .. agreed.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Japanese society is too complex and different than anywhere else. Some parallels with China, but even they arent as tied up on rules and behaviors as Japan. Its really not meant for foreigners, even Japanese raised abroad, to be part of, IMO.

Things that can seem racist, are not really racist, but just the culture, but things can be racist, using culture as an excuse. It is but isnt, case by case, situational ethics, every day, all day.

Include that in your book "know before you go"

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Why is it ok for some but not others?

Because some people are better emotionally equipped to deal with it.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

So they only take action after a celebrity is affected, that seems fair.

That’s correct. This was a purposeful decision made by a secret cabal of ruling overlords. You’ve exposed them.

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

I wasn't a regular viewer of "The Terrace", but I did watch part of the episode where she showed her anger towards a housemate for doing laundry incorrectly. It looked as though she might have been a bully herself. Anyways, it was obvious to me she had some mental issues and the producers of the show should have done something. Instead, the cyberbullys took charge.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

I dont really know what to say about that. Ive had Japanese say some pretty despicable things to me, even been assaulted while walking and being a gaijin; that was my offense. No authority or "friend" ever helped me out. An online post? its just type; you cant see the "offender" so how could you attach any feelings to it?

Oh, well then because of this, Japan trying to fix the problem now is the wrong thing to do. They clearly haven't acted on this issue quickly enough or to people's satisfaction, proving that no action should be taken in the future on it.

At least, that's what I think you're saying. I got it right, right?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Japan looking at steps against cyber-bullying

The headline says. And we have posters who seem to think that the details should already be completely worked out and announced:

If one person on facebook or twitter says I look ugly one time, is that enough to claim harassment? If 300 people do the same thing at the same time is that harassment? And then how do you legally hold 300 users responsible for the comment? With the legal process already so slow, do we really want to fill courts up with defamation lawsuits over hurt feelings?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

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