crime

Japan to pardon 600,000 to mark emperor's enthronement: media

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600,000 vs 2.5 million..... I can image the number would have been much higher if Dad was not still alive!

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

I find this highly revolting. Here, you unwashed peasants, you're free thanks to the merci of our new emperor! WTF is this? The law should be the law, always and for everybody.

-5 ( +14 / -19 )

Pardons granted to celebrate the Emperor's enthronement sounds all so feudalistic, but among the 600,000 there must be some no doubt deserving of a drop of mercy. But there must also be a number of undeserving scoundrels saved thanks to the dodgy political motives of those advising the Emperor and drawing up the list of pardonees.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

How many centuries ago did this tradition start. 7? 10? It seems like an ancient ritual to show some kind of compassion to the people. However, in this day and age it amounts to nothing more than flooding the society with criminals who have not been rehabilitated.

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

I'd like to know the criteria for these people to be considered for a pardon?

12 ( +12 / -0 )

I hope there won’t be a surge of petty crimes by those expecting the Imperial pardons.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

If what you did wasn’t evil, didn’t hurt anyone, or what you did was only to you and didn’t affect anyone else...they shouldn’t be in jail.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

How about instead they fine & jail say 10,000+ corrupt govt employee's & white collar criminals!!

Now THAT would worth CELEBRATING!!!

12 ( +13 / -1 )

I find this highly revolting. Here, you unwashed peasants, you're free thanks to the merci of our new emperor! WTF is this? The law should be the law, always and for everybody.

First off, read the article. This is not about the jailers letting the rats out of their cages. This is about people who have been convicted of crimes, some jailed, others not, having their records cleared of mostly petty crimes.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Well, when you understand the unfairness of many laws, police and many judges, things like this start to look good even if it does unfairly make the ruling class look kind and caring (they aren't).

3 ( +3 / -0 )

How many foreigners will they throw in?

9 ( +11 / -2 )

So this is a get out of jail card for all those corrupt LDP politicians, corrupt businesspeople, corrupt civil servants, corrupt public officials, corrupt school operators and the like (the list is endless), wrapped up in a merciful wave of the imperial hand.

A bizarre, anachronistic concept that paints Japan's "justice" system in an even grimmer light. It's like something out of Gormenghast, not a modern, developed democracy.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

not a modern, developed democracy

That's the thing, it's not.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

I'd like to know the criteria for these people to be considered for a pardon?

Same here. How about people who used marijuana and didn't hurt anyone?

9 ( +9 / -0 )

@ebisen

Pardons are something that happens in many countries. Almost every country does this. Times change and people pay costs. Some crimes are seen more lenient today than they were back then.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

This is definitely one of the most bizarre things I've ever heard of in Japan. Of course many countries offer presidential pardons, but the scale is extremely different. In America, you may have 10 to a 1000 people pardoned (a thousand is on an extreme level). Of these 600,000 people, how many of them are actually dangerous criminals. The problem with this whole matter is, there are too many people to watch. Instead of protecting the public, they just throw them back into society. Many people need help, but instead of helping them, they just dump them on society.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

People like Saikawa, Kansai electric bosses & others may want a quick step into jail & hope they would be considered for pardon very soon.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Good for Japan.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

Wow, I didn't expect such a negative reaction. But, I guess I should have expected so, what with the usual posters on board.

how many of them are actually dangerous criminals

Read the article. "petty" is a word that describes a certain type of crime committed. Look it up.

not a modern, developed democracy

That's the thing, it's not.

Well, compared to the originals, Britain and the US, it holds its own.

How about people who used marijuana and didn't hurt anyone?

How about we wait and see what they actually decide?

There are so few details about this and yet everyone is jumping up and down like the very act of pardoning people is a crime itself. Relax.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

What century is Japan in?

Why only around 600,000?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Ah, I knew the Japan Today readership would not disappoint in bringing their sourpuss attitude to bear on what is really just a simple, traditional and symbolic act which will end up meaning quite a bit in the lives of numerous petty (yes, petty!) criminals. Ironically, @sourpuss is one of the few who sees this, as I do, positively.

Why can we so rarely have a piece of essentially good news which is not greeted by the usual howls of derision and naysaying?

Now go ahead, prove my point, vote me down, hehe! :P

0 ( +7 / -7 )

How many centuries ago did this tradition start. 7? 10? It seems like an ancient ritual to show some kind of compassion to the people. However, in this day and age it amounts to nothing more than flooding the society with criminals who have not been rehabilitated.

Seems preferrable to pardon a large number of small criminials that pardon a couple of corrupt dangerous high-rollers Bill Clinton style. Take your pick.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Don't forget that included in this is probably people who were convicted of traffic offenses as well.

I know a few that got DUI's, pulled over for broken taillights or what not, blew positive, and ended up with a conviction on their records, even after 20 years, they are still "convicted" criminals.

They should be pardoned!

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Probably hoping to alleviate some of the pressure on companies looking to hire unskilled labor...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

.

600,000 criminals pardoned ????

And the law abiding citizens are to "celebrate this ????

I'm confused.

.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

We've noticed.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I says, pardon?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Juse by the comments that I have read in the past...

80% will be gropers from the train, 15% will be shoplifting housewives and the last 5 will be public servants

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Sourpuss

Read the article. "petty" is a word that describes a certain type of crime committed. Look it up.

Everyone is familiar with the word "petty", but clearly you know nothing about criminals, so I will enlighten you on the subject. "Petty" refers to minor or lesser crimes, that being said, criminals rarely start and end with "petty" crimes. It's usually "petty" crimes which put criminals on police radars. How are police going to monitor 600,000 people?

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Will that Morning Musume woman get her driving license back? She did not get a custodial sentence, but that was not a petty crime.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

National Pickpocket Day! I feel that once you've done the times that's enough except for certain types of crimes like pedofilia.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I hope that Megumi Igarashi gets her pardon... so she can go about publicising that which she does best.  :)

This is a governmental pardon, not an imperial pardon - but under what law can the government overturn the judgement of the court?  Sounds a bit fishy to me.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Wonder if any foreigners will be getting out of detention for petty crimes.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"Petty" refers to minor or lesser crimes, that being said, criminals rarely start and end with "petty" crimes.

Wow, using a rather wide brush to paint all people convicted of minor crimes here!

Not all people convicted of "petty" crimes turns into a hardened criminal,. There are only around 20,000 prisoners being held in jails throughout Japan.

SO, your assumption here is far off base!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

“The Japanese government is planning to grant pardons to about 600,000 petty criminals ......

Asked about the government's plan on amnesty .....”

Pardon and Amnesty are not equivalent terms. I believe the word wanted here is “pardon”.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yubaru

The only one making assumptions is you. I happen to be very familiar with law enforcement, and statistics do not differ greatly when looking at petty crimes internationally.

Lets make this very clear. You used the the words "hardened criminal" which refers to extreme cases where they cannot be rehabilitated. I was only saying that petty crimes most often escalate if the person is not properly rehabilitated, like in this case.

So, you think because they committed a smaller crime that they are harmless? Why do you think Japan bans any foreigners with slightest criminal record into the country?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Yubaru

There are only around 20,000 prisoners being held in jails throughout Japan.

Your statistics seem to contradict what is being reported. 600,000 is just a random number right?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Great! But there are tens of thousands of old jail birds who don't want to be pardoned. When they are released, they commit another crime just to get back inside. Bed, health, some companions. Many prisons were altered to accommodate these old jail birds.

Many people are in prisons and police detention centers for minor petty crimes, sometimes waiting more than two years for a court case trial. In other countries they probably would be on probation.

The prison population is very low, around 70,000 compared with the American 2.5 million inmates.

Most of the 600,000 pardons are for people who have served time and now released.

A foreigner with a criminal record isn't an automatic cancellation of visa or residence. Each case on merit.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In 2016 the prison population was 55,967 inmates. 5.5% foreigners.

Official capacity of prison system 90,536 inmates. No overcrowding.

https://www.prisonstudies.org/country/japan

1 ( +1 / -0 )

 know a few that got DUI's, pulled over for broken taillights or what not, blew positive, and ended up with a conviction on their records, even after 20 years, they are still "convicted" criminals.

They should be pardoned!

No, these are the types of idiots who should never be pardoned. it's never OK to drink and drive. period. end. of. sentence.

and by the "i know a few" it probably means that you were one of these "bright" people who were caught drinking and driving. smgdfh...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Your statistics seem to contradict what is being reported. 600,000 is just a random number right?

One, read what I wrote. The number I gave is for people ACTUALLY behind bars. Large difference

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In 2016 the prison population was 55,967 inmates. 5.5% foreigners.

Official capacity of prison system 90,536 inmates. No overcrowding.

https://www.prisonstudies.org/country/japan

As of 2018...

Hmmm.... Prison population total (including pre-trial detainees / remand prisoners) 51, 805

Pre-trial detainees / remand prisoners (percentage of prison population) 10.8% (31.7.2018)

Female prisoners (percentage of prison population) 8.3% (31.7.2018)

Foreign prisoners (percentage of prison population) 5.5%

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The only one making assumptions is you. I happen to be very familiar with law enforcement, and statistics do not differ greatly when looking at petty crimes internationally.

Internationally? We are talking about Japan here! Dont obfuscate the issue!

Lets make this very clear. You used the the words "hardened criminal" which refers to extreme cases where they cannot be rehabilitated. I was only saying that petty crimes most often escalate if the person is not properly rehabilitated, like in this case.

You are assuming something based upon your "international" knowledge right? Again this is Japan. Try again, it's still an assumption on YOUR part.

So, you think because they committed a smaller crime that they are harmless? Why do you think Japan bans any foreigners with slightest criminal record into the country?

Ha...little do you know about Japanese immigration. People convicted of "smaller" crimes abroad, live and work here everyday!

You MIGHT know something about "international" but you know little of Japan.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Yubaru

In my opinion, a drunk driver is quite guilty. Why would he “deserve” to be pardoned?

Knowingly drinking and driving puts other people’s lives knowingly at risk.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

In France, our newly elected "princident" pardons (well pardoned as it's probably over) offenses punished by fines due to the State. Mostly that was traffic and parking tickets. (And it's over, because in the year ahead of elections, many car drivers would do just anything in the streets as they would never need to pay their tickets) So I guess Japan can "forget" a series of due fines. That could explain why it's 600 000 cases.

For other cases, that poses problem. For dangerous criminals... well, there is the safety issue.

For others, the victims become what ? Suppose you were victim of your neighbor, he destroyed your house, and he was condemned to repay the prejudice. If the Tenno pardons him, great for him, he doesn't repay. But you, ? You lose justice for yourself ?

Pardon Ghosn! FREE GHOSN!!!

If they want to waive his expected fines to Japanese tax office... well, OK, Naruhito's choice. But as a stockholder of Nissan-Renault, I want the "missing" 100 millions of euros to be back to the companies.

But it would be a nice gesture by thre Monarch (who many in Japan still see as a god) to "allow" Ghosn to see his wife.

Kami-sama, let the doomed lovers meet on Tanabata day. It's too late for this year. Maybe on Christmas then ?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Rather than incarcerate petty criminals and then give them an amnesty, would Japans monarch not be better instigating law reform.

A certain ongoing case is highlighting a lot of shortcomings regarding Japans justice system (or so-called justice system).

And we all know what that case is, don't we?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Knowingly drinking and driving puts other people’s lives knowingly at risk.

Drinking and driving accidents and deaths are so statistically insignificant in Japan they are often listed in the "other" category. I hope if anyone found themself in jail for nothing driving after drinking but were still basically sober and safer to drive than an angry or sleepy person is pardoned along with everyone else in the pen for a victimless "crime".

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

When they are released, they commit another crime just to get back inside.

Those will be petty crimes. The price of freedom is risk. If we have to risk a tad bit more shoplifting so a person who is in jail for a victimless "crime" obtains freedom, its well worth it. It could be you unfairly jailed next.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There isn't 600,000 inmates in prison. This is Japan not America. The pardons will be mostly for people not currently in prisons.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Coskuri, “Suppose you were victim of your neighbor, he destroyed your house, and he was condemned to repay the prejudice. If the Tenno pardons him, great for him, he doesn't repay. But you, ? You lose justice for yourself ?” ... “well, OK, Naruhito's choice”

You should perhaps read the article again. Destroying a house is not a petty crime and therefore irrelevant. And it will not be the Emperor doing the pardoning, it’s the government. Naruhito’s choice has nothing to do with it.

Ex-Res, “Rather than incarcerate petty criminals and then give them an amnesty, would Japans monarch not be better instigating law reform.”

The Japanese Emperor has nothing to do with making laws and cannot instigate law reform.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ex-Res, “Rather than incarcerate petty criminals and then give them an amnesty, would Japans monarch not be better instigating law reform.”

The Japanese Emperor has nothing to do with making laws and cannot instigate law reform.

Then he is neither Emperor, nor Head of State, and certainly not any conscience or spiritual leader of Japan.

Although the fact that he can give an amnesty to individuals does give him some power regarding law in his realm.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Ex-res, “Although the fact that he can give an amnesty to individuals does give him some power regarding law in his realm.”

Again, he is not the one who will be doing the pardoning. You need to read the article again carefully.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ex-res, “Although the fact that he can give an amnesty to individuals does give him some power regarding law in his realm.”

Again, he is not the one who will be doing the pardoning. You need to read the article again carefully.

It sounds like a similar system to my native country, where a bill is debated by government and then presented to the Monarch to be approved.

I believe that the was one instance though, sometime in the 1900's when a budget was presented to the Monarch, who was not happy, and would not approve it until certain adjustment were made.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Yubaru

Internationally? We are talking about Japan here! Dont obfuscate the issue!

Please explain to me why criminals are unique to the rest of the world? I'm not talking about the specifics of the crimes, or the statistics, but the individuals.

I was actually a bit surprised they changed the laws. Back when I came to Japan, it was tough getting in if you even had the slightest criminal record.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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