crime

Japan to introduce electronic arrest warrants, interrogation records

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Will hanko still be required to verify a defendants statement for instance? Means the fax machine still has plenty of life here.

-13 ( +11 / -24 )

“the fax machine still has plenty of life here”

It’s good to have alternatives. When one thing fails, you can still fall back on something else.

-2 ( +8 / -10 )

So defendant will be able to connect online from their summer house in Lebanon?

Yes, and that's a good thing. It puts a stop to Japan s hostage taking.

-7 ( +11 / -18 )

I hope I never have to find out about this first hand. At least I can say that in spite of the forced confessions and unfettered police and prosecutor power, Japan does not have many inmates and generally does not want to support people in jail.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Imagine calling yourself a modern country, yet not allowing a lawyer to be present during police questioning, or videotaping/soundtaping of such questioning.

-2 ( +15 / -17 )

David BrentToday  09:51 am JST

Imagine calling yourself a modern country, yet not allowing a lawyer to be present during police questioning, or videotaping/soundtaping of such questioning.

Imagine willfully continuing to live in such a country.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

factcheckerToday  07:06 am JST

Will hanko still be required to verify a defendants statement for instance? Means the fax machine still has plenty of life here.

Even in the United States there are still some tax related documents which require faxing as opposed to emailing. Besides, digital signatures can replace hanko seals.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

How about requiring recording of the interrogations? It doesn't even have to be digital. Baby steps.

(Being able to have a lawyer present would be kinda nice, too.)

8 ( +8 / -0 )

American lawyers are required to fax their legal documents.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

The adoption of such systems on a global scale would require widespread changes in legal and law enforcement practices, as well as investments in technology infrastructure. The probability of global implementation would depend on: legal and regulatory frameworks, political will, international collaboration, and cultural and social considerations.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

While the Japan Federation of Bar Associations has been calling for lawyers' interviews with suspects and defendants to be done online, it was not included in the latest proposals.

Hold your horses there fellas. We actually secretly like the way our hostage justice system works. Under the right conditions, everyone cracks eventually and we are very proud of our stellar 99% conviction rate.

No one really cares either, apart from those annoying folk directly affected by the so very, very rare cases where injustice MAY HAVE ( never admit to anything ) occurred #nervoussideglance.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Japan claiming to digitize anything since the Sony CD-Walkman is a joke and everyone here knows it.

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

So defendant will be able to connect online from their summer house in Lebanon?

Carlos might have gotten a suspended sentence anyway or minimal prison time (would have been a free man a long time ago). Now he's a wanted man forever. Don't forget that Japan's sentence guidelines are some of the easiest in the world in terms of durations. You murder someone in this country - or sell drugs- you won't get that much time compared to the USA. Yevgeniy Vasilievich Bayraktar for example only got 8 years for what he did (what if it was Texas?) Madoff would have gotten not more than 10~15 years for example.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The irony of the hostage justice is that the criminals are good at not confessing.

Only innocent people and amateurs might confess.

99% of trials are based on confessions.

The profesional criminals never confess, never go to trial.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

This can only go awry. Japan never does anything well when it's anything online or electronic.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

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