crime

Yakuza boss sentenced to death for ordering murder

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Little by little the Yakuza is running out, it is no longer as profitable as before and the government and the police are cutting off their sources of income.

Hopefully this just and deserved execution serves as an example for the Yakuza to think in a retirement and for the silly Yakuza-wannabe not to commit that stupidity.. The Yakuza are in extinction, very good for Japan !!..

3 ( +15 / -12 )

Japanese media said the verdict came despite a lack of evidence directly linking him to the crimes.

16 ( +19 / -3 )

The fisheries cooperative official shot dead in 1998 is a former yakuza who stabbed the brother of a Kudo-kai official to death in 1950, not a good citizen.

15 ( +17 / -2 )

Ku-dokai is definitely not an association of choirboys and they have a lot on their conscience, but not sure how to take the "The Fukuoka District Court sentenced Nomura to death, while Japanese media said the verdict came despite a lack of evidence directly linking him to the crimes." and the ""Prosecutors reportedly argued that Nomura had exerted absolute control over the syndicate. ""-parts...

If I recall the boss of a criminal organization may be liable for "damages" in case of any crime committed by his underlings. Would it mean that in case of murder, he would be liable for the death penalty?

Again, criminal organizations are a violent cancer to society, but if the system itself starts to make lightly of key elements like evidencing or who to punish for a crime and who / when to apply capital punishment to I can't help but feel that we're facing some important questions to ask here...

Not even mentioning that at the other end of the legal spectrum, when it comes to white-collar and political crimes, despite sometimes having evidence and while knowing that the people at the top (e.g. chairman, CEO, boards, party-leaders, ministers and PMs) also wield absolute control over their respective organizations, does the fact that ultimately nothing happens also make you wonder as well...

15 ( +18 / -3 )

The first yakuza head sentenced to death.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

You will regret this for the rest of your life

I doubt seriously anyone would regret that decision or even mourn for the guy.

7 ( +14 / -7 )

You will regret this for the rest of your life

HiroToday  07:39 am JST I doubt seriously anyone would regret that decision or even mourn for the guy.

You misunderstand, Hiro, he means that he will somehow get revenge on the judge by other yak members.

Nasty scum these yaks. The more gone, the better.

23 ( +27 / -4 )

The yakuza were long tolerated in Japan as a necessary evil for ensuring order on the streets and getting things done quickly, however dubious the means.

Yeah, as in many other Asian countries, goons and gangsters have been tolerated by authoritarian government party honchos to hammer down any nails that pose political inconveniences. The fact that there appears to be no direct evidence tying an unsavory mastermind like Nomura to the crimes poses no obstacle when a political purpose requires a guilty verdict. When justice gets in the way of politics. something has gotta give. This is just a fact of life that we all become aware of when we grow up.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Give me a moment, while I shed a fictitious tear. Bye Satoru.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Keep the hits coming, don't stop. Go after the corrupt politicians who are on the take from them as well.

13 ( +14 / -1 )

Good! I hope he has a good time.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

So long, Yak scum. Preying on the weak, Stealing from the gullible. Victimizing the vulnerable.

Society is better off without you.

14 ( +17 / -3 )

and a 2013 knife attack against a nurse at a clinic where Nomura was seeking treatment, the court reportedly said.

It was just showing on the tv this story.Whilst in hospital,a nurse treating him around the stomach area,made him wince.He made an issue of it, and she told him that the tattoos he had would have been more painful than what was being done.Not impressed, he had her KILLED.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Good news to wake up to for once!

Hope this gangster scum lives in fear each remaining day for when that noose will come...

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Very interesting, as I just watched a documentary on his group.

Even other Yakuza viewed these guys as over the top violent.

This group firebombed Shinzo Abe's home, used fragmentation grenades, etc....

This guy made the rest of the Yakuza look like choir boys.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

scum off the earth. No regrets!

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Lack of direct evidence but indirect evidence have been accumulated enough.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

It was just showing on the tv this story.Whilst in hospital,a nurse treating him around the stomach area,made him wince.He made an issue of it, and she told him that the tattoos he had would have been more painful than what was being done.Not impressed, he had her KILLED.

The nurse is not dead.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

It sets a dangerous precedent when we simply accept a preponderance of evidence as justification for the death penalty. While few may care in this specific case, innocent people (see the Menda and Hakamada cases) can unjustly fall victim of such a lax evidentiary standard, with no possibility of redress once the sentence has been carried out.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

@AntiqueSaving

This group firebombed Shinzo Abe's home, used fragmentation grenades, etc....

This one sparked my interest. Especially in regard to the Sakura no Kai scandal where a few of what the media calls "半グレイ (half-grey)" characters showed up. (Some articles actually mention participation of (former) Yamaguchi-gumi members.)

"Hangurei" are supposed to be people hovering around the crime world of Japan. If mobsters (yakuza) are considered "クロ (black)", not sure why non-mobsters hovering around them are "half-grey" and not "grey", but anyway.

I did find in Japan Wiki an entry about the firebombing of Abe's house.

https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%AE%89%E5%80%8D%E6%99%8B%E4%B8%89%E5%AE%85%E7%81%AB%E7%82%8E%E7%93%B6%E6%8A%95%E6%93%B2%E4%BA%8B%E4%BB%B6

The interesting part being the highlighted part of "2006年7月12日、福岡地方裁判所小倉支部(野島秀夫裁判長)で論告求刑公判が開かれ、検察は――土地ブローカーは、1999年の下関市長選挙で安倍が支持する候補者の当選に寄与したとして、安倍の秘書に対し絵画の買い取りを名目に500万円の支払いを要求。秘書が300万円を工面したものの、安倍からそれ以上の金員を拒絶されたため、土地ブローカーは恨みを抱き親交のあった暴力団員と共謀して報復した。――などと主張した。"

I would roughly translate that into:

According to the prosecution: a land broker (actually: the president / owner of a construction company) testified that:

"In exchange for his (the land broker's) contribution to the (successful) election of a candidate backed by Abe (Shinzo) to the position of Shimonoseki City major did the land broker ask Abe's secretary to purchase a picture for a value of 5 Mio JPY. The secretary only raised 3 Mio JPY as Abe "refused to pay more". This infuriated the land broker who then colluded with a friend who was a mobster to retaliate".

The usual ingredients of: politics, elections, secretaries going rogue, dirty money being exchanged are this time mixed with mobsters and mob-related violence.

This sheds a light a little different on the English Wiki entry mentioning this incident of an attack on Abe as an attack on a "Katagi" or "civilian" as in: non-criminal or non-crime-related persona.

Again, this does in no way diminish the fact that the Kudokai are violent scum and have attacked civilians. It just highlights that Japan has a long history of politicians and mobsters fraying and that obviously sparks may fly between them...

Oh yeah, the Kudokai boss got 20 years for instructing the crime, his number 2 who executed the attack 12 years, a gang member 10 years and the land owner 13 years for requesting the attack. As for what happened to Abe, the rest is History as they say...

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Addition: oh yeah, age is taking its toll on me!

How could I forget how much this reminds of the Hiroshima-Kawaii couple vote buying scandal under...Abe as a PM this time. History does seem to repeat a lot around the Shinz...

4 ( +4 / -0 )

He was also behind a 2014 attack on a relative of the murder victim, and a 2013 knife attack against a nurse at a clinic where Nomura was seeking treatment, the court reportedly said.

Nomura actually sought the treatment of penis enlargement and hair removal around his private part. The outcome was however not satisfactory, so he ordered his guys to attack the nurse. Shame and brutal.

《死刑判決》局部の増大手術と周辺の脱毛治療を行った看護師に…工藤会トップ・野村悟の残虐非道な“脅し”の手口

https://bunshun.jp/articles/-/48145

3 ( +3 / -0 )

With the exception of the AUM leaders, Japan has exercised the death penalty only sparingly over the past several decades. I suppose it's unlikely Mr. Nomura will be sent to the gallows. But his presence on death row may deter other gang members from misbehavior. I suppose this was the prosecutor's strategy all along.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

blue@Hangure -- グレ, not グレイ -- does not have anything to do with gray. The word is a spinoff from gurentai, a defunct word quasi-yakuza who were active in the 1950s and 60s. Gure is a short form of gureru, a slang word used to mean when the upper and lower halves of a mollusk shell don't match, i.e., a misfit. Author Atsushi Mizoguchi coined the word some years ago.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Yakuza boss sentenced to death for ordering murder

So looks like he ordered death.... his own

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@NCIS Reruns

The Gurentai? Ok, now it clicks. Apologies for the confusion.

Thanks for the correction. Much appreciated.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The yakuza were long tolerated in Japan as a necessary evil for ensuring order on the streets and getting things done quickly, however dubious the means.

if you ever wondered why the Japanese are so law-abiding, it's not necessarily some deep sense of morality but the terror of the yakuza and what they might do to them (no longer consciously of course)

3 ( +4 / -1 )

A necessary evil criminal gang thats "not illegal "- tolerated or used to restore order in society with quick violent crimes with its own personal gray area and headquarters in plain view of police.

Yakuza have infiltrated every level of Japanese society and have territory on every island and city in Japan and elsewhere.

Hmm,...what's wrong with this picture???

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The 2012 shooting of a former police official 

Now I understand.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

if you ever wondered why the Japanese are so law-abiding, it's not necessarily some deep sense of morality but the terror of the yakuza and what they might do to them (no longer consciously of course)

Is this referring to the post-war period?

It is true that there was a time when the yakuza fought against a group of foreign delinquents (mainly Koreans) to protect public safety.

The scene is depicted in the biographical film of the third generation leader of the Yamaguchi-gumi.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The existence of the yakuza is not illegal because the Constitution guarantees freedom of association.

Foreigners do not know how much the police and yakuza have fought each other.

I've never seen the massive yakuza extermination campaigns in 1964 and 1970 explained in a foreign language.

All yakuza organizations except for the Yamaguchi-gumi were disbanded during this campaign, and the ones that remain today are the ones that were reunited afterwards.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

In 1884, a measure was taken to allow yakuza (at that time, gamblers) to be imprisoned for 10 years without trial.

If you want to know about the yakuza, read books by yakuza experts like Mizoguchi and Suzuki.

I wonder why their books are not translated into English and why a guy named jake, who plagiarizes their articles, is writing articles for western media!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

A wiki detailing the massive police operation to eradicate the yakuza in 1964.

There doesn't seem to be an English version, so you'll have to translate the Japanese.

https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%AC%AC%E4%B8%80%E6%AC%A1%E9%A0%82%E4%B8%8A%E4%BD%9C%E6%88%A6

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I think it’s a mistake by the public and the media to criticize the Yakuza. It was a very efficient nightlife/prostitution/underground police force, well organized with high moral values. Just after the Kobe earthquake they were the first on the ground to save people and help the public

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Yakuza is now on its death bed. The native Japanese organized crimes have become Japanese mafias instead, while foreign crime syndicates steadily dominate the whole of Japan.

Yakuza does not truly exist anymore but there are only Japanese gangs or mafias.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

I think it’s a mistake by the public and the media to criticize the Yakuza.

Yeah, why criticize them! They are just misunderstood.

All they do is deal massive quantities of drugs, import, sell and use guns against police, extort money from business and citizens, traffic in sex workers, and violently attack completely innocent people.

Great "moral values" indeed.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Just after the Kobe earthquake they were the first on the ground to save people and help the public

One or two good acts like giving candy to kids do not wipe out all the bad stuff they do. In Kobe, I always avoided them like the plague.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Other yakuza usually do not attack civilians.

The Kudo-kai were hated because they were more like the mafia than the yakuza, harming civilians who stood up to them and attacking the police.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

In an interview with a newspaper in 2011, the leader of the Yamaguchi-gumi said, "The Yamaguchi-gumi is a gentlemanly organization in the yakuza industry.

I don't think this is a complete lie.

The Yamaguchi-gumi prohibits the sale and purchase of methamphetamine according to the policy of the third generation leader.

Any member who is found to be involved in methamphetamine trafficking will be expelled from the organization, and if the leader is involved, the entire organization will be dissolved.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Expect a long stay on Death Row. Any day could be your last. When an execution order has been issued, the condemned prisoner is only informed on the morning of their execution, and is given a choice of a last meal.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

igfklinToday  01:19 pm JST

Other yakuza usually do not attack civilians.

The Kudo-kai were hated because they were more like the mafia than the yakuza, harming civilians who stood up to them and attacking the police.

No, they just intimidate and threaten them.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

> Gabor FabriciusToday  12:30 pm JST

I think it’s a mistake by the public and the media to criticize the Yakuza

I think it's right to criticize anyone and anything if there is reason to do so.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

About 30 years ago next to the place where I was living, there was also a Yakuza office.

They had to do with porn movies and foreign prostitutes and collecting protection money from night clubs.

They were always very polite, silent and never disturbed other people living nearby.

The area was crime-free, day and night.

They closed their office and left the area more than 10 years ago. Never seen again. From that moment on suddenly crimes were reported from stealing bicycles, vandalizing cars, burglaries... The street was rather dark during night and it became also a place for urinating at electric poles and dumping trash like old heavy TV-sets.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

The judge in this Yakuza death penalty case has more ‘cahones’ than the new great fearless leader of America.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

"I asked for a fair decision... You will regret this for the rest of your life," Nomura told the judge

Yikes.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

verdict came despite a lack of evidence

Learned quickly from their old Iranian and new Taliban friends. There you are also sentenced to death without evidence. lol

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

They are not 'nice guys' lol. My grandfather in-law was a boss before he got old, sick and died. While many of them have some kind of moral code, nice guys they are not!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

"Japanese judge stabbed in revenge attack" in 3...2...

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Now he understands what a 99% conviction rate means.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

One of today’s first posters may have gotten it right. To paraphrase:

- “…the Yakuza is no longer as profitable as the government…” -

Surprising if such some from native(?) Japanese.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Nice to see Japan still use the death penalty. Scrubbing the worst criminals out is a good thing to do. I fully support the judge's decision here.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Japanese media said the verdict came despite a lack of evidence directly linking him to the crimes.

That is not justice! With that illogical thinking, they can put anyone in jail just because they believe the person is guilty without evidence. Without a witness, without video evidence, and without audio evidence, they should not be sentencing anyone to prison let alone the death sentence without proof. Gut feelings is not proof. It does not matter if the person is actually guilty.

Every citizen should be worried about this verdict.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Why do Japanese think that foreigners dont know whats happening or happened in Japan is ridiculous.

Oh you're a foreigner so that means you obviously don't know anything .

As they wear their ball caps and tennis shoes and blue jeans and adopted foreign food , technologies and trying to lecture us on what foreigners don't know about Japanese culture.

Oh we know about Japanese culture !!

Go back to isolation for another 250 years and im sure that will help Japan's foreign policies and sexist and racist prejudice bigotry.

Without foreign influence and products Japan would be even worse off.

To be Japanese or hon/ nihonjin means to live in harmony.

To be predujice is not harmonious and therefore not Japanese.

One minute they want foreigners to be comfortable in Japan the next minute were treated with bigotry.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It's not a good idea to comment here! The Yakuza might hunt us down one by one. Luckily for me I use a fake e-mail, VPN, and a Virtual Machine.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

With that illogical thinking, they can put anyone in jail just because they believe the person is guilty without evidence. 

I understand there is more to it than is reported here. I've read that the Kudo-Kai is "a special designated dangerous crime organization under the anti-organized crime law" and is the only such group in Japan so designated. Under the anti organized crime law, I think this places the head of such an organization with responsibility for crimes carried out by members. I'm no expert on this so I may be wrong, but if that's the case, unless you are the head of such an organization, you shouldn't worry too much about being jailed without evidence.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

NumanToday  05:17 pm JST

Japanese media said the verdict came despite a lack of evidence directly linking him to the crimes.

That is not justice! With that illogical thinking, they can put anyone in jail just because they believe the person is guilty without evidence. Without a witness, without video evidence, and without audio evidence, they should not be sentencing anyone to prison let alone the death sentence without proof. Gut feelings is not proof. It does not matter if the person is actually guilty.

Every citizen should be worried about this verdict.

Do you happen to know what are the direct evidence and what are indirect evidence n this verdict where 88 people ( most of them are ex-Yakuza under them in Kudo-kai who know how they do things there) testified there?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

If you think actual Yakuza perpetrators of each incidents would honestly confess the motives of such crimes, keep singing for human rights for Yakuza, or keep bashing justice here with ignoring those human rights of actual civilian victims. Yakuza knows very well the very boundary for agitating so-called humanist like yourself

for their everyday business against pure civilians.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

"I asked for a fair decision... You will regret this for the rest of your life," Nomura told the judge after his sentencing

I dunno about you, but where I'm from, this is called "threatening a judge" whis a more serious offence and can get you in deeper trouble. In his case, they should expidite his sentence to 20 mins after the hearing. After all, it is going to happen at some point, why not then for mouthing off at the judge?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"You will regret this for the rest of your life," 

Judge should go

' Nah I'm good. Your the dude who's going to die f*cker'

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You're

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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