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Japanese Ferrari designer gets suspended term for speeding

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Not sure which is more ridiculous, the overcompensating 63 year-old aging disgracefully, or the 40 km/h speed limit of this "safety" nanny state.

-7 ( +13 / -20 )

Okuyama admitted to speeding, saying he wanted to expose the engine to fast-moving air to cool it down, according to his lawyer

Thats why they have test tracks you reckless idiot! I used to use the higashi-Kanto freeway often to go up to Kashima. Many times I had groups of sports cars (probably clubs) fly past me weaving in and out of traffic at speeds around 200kph. It would only take one slight error and people start to die. Just because they have the money to buy these cars does not mean they are above the law. This guy should have done fine in jail. He should also have had his license suspended for at least two years.

1 ( +12 / -11 )

Today  06:49 am JST Not sure which is more ridiculous, the overcompensating 63 year-old aging disgracefully, or the 40 km/h speed limit of this "safety" nanny state.

Until the early 1970s, Japan endured a high rate of road fatalities. Now the nation boasts one of the world’s best traffic safety records.

( In 2022, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced that the surge in American traffic deaths is continuing: An estimated 9,560 people died on US roadways in the first quarter of 2022, 7% more than a year ago and the highest first quarter total in two decades.

Almost all developed nations have seen a decline in roadway deaths over the last decade, while the US has endured a 30% rise.

The contrast is even starker with Japan. Fewer than 3,000 people died in Japanese crashes in 2021, compared to almost 43,000 in the United States. On a per capita basis, Japan had just 2.24 deaths per 100,000 residents, less than a fifth the US rate of 12.7 per 100,000. )

And Japanese roads are getting even safer: 2021 saw the fewest road fatalities of any year since record-keeping began in 1948. It’s quite a change from the 1960s, when a booming economy and millions of inexperienced drivers contributed to annual fatality figures six times higher than they are today. So dangerous were the nation’s streets that Japanese observers called the phenomenon the “Traffic War,” noting that annual roadway deaths exceeded those from the First Sino-Japanese War in 1894-5.

Japan is now a traffic safety success story, especially when compared to the US.

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

It’s possible, maybe, I may have driven 120 in a 50km zone accidentally. But prison is absolutely ridiculous.

drive safe to the conditions. If there is a village or intersection or combini, slow down. Also beware of deer and monkeys. My partner smashed the car twice hitting deer.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Rich people always get away with it.

9 ( +13 / -4 )

rcch

Today 07:37 am JST

Nice try.

What you forgot to point out was one of the biggest contributing factors.

Cyclists in Japan with zero understanding of the road laws.

Instead of informing road regulations on cyclists the government opted to reduce speed to the point you are supposed to be able to stop regardless if obasan flies across the road from an alley without stopping or looking.

This worked for a while but as we now know is again a problem.

Not able to realistically reduce speed limits anymore.

The laws were changed to make cyclists more responsible in the event of an accident.

To tell you what it is like, last night I drove to pick up my wife just 2 kilometers from the house because she had heavy things to bring home.

On that 2 Km drive I had to dodge 3 cyclists, one old lady bolted across a 3 lane road without looking she had stop sign, next not 200 m after an old man on a power assist bicycle just road across the large intersection diagonally on a green light for everyone going straight.

The 3dr was again someone just bolting across the road without doing their stop.

So do I drive over the 30 K/h on my road or the 40K/h on the larger road? Not very often never at night and never in the rain.

Because I am not going to be held responsible for hitting a fool with no idea about the road laws.

Oh and anyone owning a high speed sports car in Japan that does not have regular access to a private track is a fool.

Too dangerous to speed roads are too narrow, the road surface in most places will rip apart the undercarriage.

-4 ( +7 / -11 )

he wanted to expose the engine to fast-moving air to cool it down,

What a comedian! And why was the engine hot? Could it have been because he was driving fast to generate this fast-moving air?

3 ( +7 / -4 )

rcch.....

Comparing the fatalities to population in road accidents in Japan and the US is meaningless. You also need to account for the kilometers driven.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

A prison term seems excessive.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

It is rare a speeding or traffic violation ends up in court.

Despite the law saying it is a crime, usually if you pay the fine the system forgoes the charges.

This is why for a non Japanese citizen it is highly recommended to never challenge a traffic ticket.

If your challenge is rejected then it isn't just a fine and the end.

It is jokingly a criminal offense and depending on your visa/pr you could have them cancelled and you are deported.

If you don't believe it there are several Japanese lawyers that were kind enough to post the information in English.

So be aware of this. No it is not a 100% you will lose you right to remain but it is a possibility.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Okuyama told reporters, "I will make sure this will never happen again and will contribute to society. I am very sorry."

Pathetic..

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

that is what the car is built for - SPEED.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

rcch,

Japan ranks 16th in the world with a deaths/km driven rate slightly worse than the USA, but twice as bad as European nations - which have far higher speed limits by the way.

The biggest contribution to this disparity is roundabouts vs traffic lights. It's almost impossible to have a head on collision on the former, but the latter positively encourages the most dangerous accident you can have.

As for Japan's decrease in deaths since the '60s, cracking down on drink driving in the '90s had a reasonable effect, but by far the greatest factor is increased inherent safety in cars sold. Better brakes, seatbelts, stability control and construction. The rest is just gravy.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

@rcch, nice try. 33% of Japan's population lives in Tokyo or its neighboring prefectures, where the use of cars is limited, in general. Which means that the nation has a lower mileage per year than the US, where literally everyone drives except (maybe) New York City, whose greater area population counts 19 million people, or roughly 5% of the US population.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Rich people always get away with it.

Correct. Just look at the PM of the UK

1 ( +5 / -4 )

What a joke. Raise your silly low speed limits on sone roads

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Prison time for speeding, ridiculous! He must be rich give him a huge fine.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

titinToday 10:29 am JST

@rcch, nice try. 33% of Japan's population lives in Tokyo or its neighboring prefectures, where the use of cars is limited, in general. Which means that the nation has a lower mileage per year than the US, where literally everyone drives except (maybe) New York City, whose greater area population counts 19 million people, or roughly 5% of the US population

Tell 'em. I have to explain the difference between MLB and NPB all the time, too. Don't compare dynamic to static. Japan could fit inside California. I could go on.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Good! This is not a place to speed at your own will. Respect the rules on Japanese roadways.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Oh and anyone owning a high speed sports car in Japan that does not have regular access to a private track is a fool.

Clearly you know nothing about cars and likely would be unable to control one above the speed limit!

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Most supercar manufacturers have access to their own testing facilities or private racing circuits where you can test the limits of the car.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Despite the law saying it is a crime, usually if you pay the fine the system forgoes the charges.

Does it not depend on how much above the speed limit you are driving whether it is treated as a crime or just a traffic infraction? I think it's 30 km/h above the limit of normal roads and 40 km/h above the limit on expressways. (But please correct me if I'm wrong about that.)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Hakman

the sentence will remain on his record, 4 months in prison, suspended. Since no one was hurt I think it is excessive.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Okuyama admitted to speeding, saying he wanted to expose the engine to fast-moving air to cool it down.

I'll have to remember that one if I ever get pulled over for speeding in my EK9 Type R.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Last time I checked, the Enzo Ferrari cost over US$2.5 million. I think Mr. Fancy-Pants Speed Freak can pay a hefty fine. The judge let him off easy.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I'll have to remember that one if I ever get pulled over for speeding in my EK9 Type R.

I wish I'd thought of that when I got caught for speeding in my 1985 Daihatsu Atrai. All I remember is the policeman telling me I was an idiot for not knowing that speed traps were placed everywhere during Golden Week.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"The degree of speeding was considerable and was extremely dangerous," said Judge Osamu Imai

......but........

The Yamagata District Court gave Okuyama, 63, a prison term of four months, suspended for two years, for driving the Enzo Ferrari at a speed of 128 kilometers per hour, 88 kph over the speed limit

Yeah......makes sense! Makes enough sense for me to go out there and speed 88 kph over the limit, apologise and know I can get away with it! Makes sense now! That a joke this system is! If it were you or me in that drivers seat doing those speeds........well.......we won't be here reading this now, wouldn't we? I guess.....money talks?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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