crime

Former defense minister shot near home in Iwate

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Wait, I thought guns were tightly controlled in Japan.

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

Wait, I thought guns were tightly controlled in Japan.

Just because something is tightly controlled doesn’t mean people cannot possess that item.

Firearms are tightly controlled in Japan; however, with the proper training and permits people are allowed to own firearms for hunting and target shooting.

6 ( +12 / -6 )

Wait, I thought guns were tightly controlled in Japan.

They are. You aren't silly enough to think this incident disproves that, are you?

7 ( +13 / -6 )

Guns ARE tightly regulated and controlled for the average citizen.

What needs one's attention is the fact that the victim worked for Prime Minister Murayama's administration.

Murayama was the leader of the Socialist Party (they changed their name to Social Democratic Party), and did things like apologize for the comfort women, which implicated that the Emperor did less than exemplary things during the war.

So that should clarify what type of organization the shooter belongs to, if one knows anything about post-war politics in Japan.

If not, one can research what happened to the leader of the Socialist Party in 1960. His name was Asanuma.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Got to watch your back for those long held grudges... 82 years old and now going to jail for life instead of spending peaceful days with grandkids...

0 ( +2 / -2 )

RecklessToday  09:15 am JST

82 years old and now going to jail for life

Why would you think that will happen, when an elderly man can stove his wife's head in with a hammer, and not be prosecuted?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

This dispels the myth that you know everything about Japan. Just because something is tightly controlled doesn’t mean people cannot possess that item. Logic failure.

Firearms are tightly controlled in Japan; however, with the proper training and permits people are allowed to own firearms for hunting and target shooting.

well said chip!

Guns ARE tightly regulated and controlled for the average citizen.

> What needs one's attention is the fact that the victim worked for Prime Minister Murayama's administration.

> Murayama was the leader of the Socialist Party (they changed their name to Social Democratic Party), and did things like apologize for the comfort women, which implicated that the Emperor did less than exemplary things during the war.

> So that should clarify what type of organization the shooter belongs to, if one knows anything about post-war politics in Japan.

> If not, one can research what happened to the leader of the Socialist Party in 1960. His name was Asanuma.

excellent post sir!

2 ( +8 / -6 )

excellent post sir!

Thank you, appreciate it.

Certain organizations are keen on insuring that the LDP remain in power, and view intimidation as a valid tactic.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Moonbloom,

”So that should clarify what type of organization the shooter belongs to, if one knows anything about post-war politics in Japan.”

Does the suspect belong to an organization of any relevance? He is a farmer, a childhood classmate of Tamazawa, says he loaned money he made from farming to Tamazawa in 1972, and that Tamazawa never paid it back, says a friend gave him the gun.

Invalid CSRF

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Certain organizations are keen on insuring that the LDP remain in power, and view intimidation as a valid tactic.

Very Very True

3 ( +4 / -1 )

says he loaned money he made from farming to Tamazawa in 1972, and that Tamazawa never paid it back, says a friend gave him the gun.

So he lent him some money in 1972 and decides to shoot him in 2019?....Hmmmm....

4 ( +5 / -1 )

At his advanced age, a threat of life in prison isn't much of a deterrent, is it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Since it was a handgun that he used, according to this news, it was probably illegally owned by the person he had borrowed it from. Such guns do exist in Japan, but they are usually hidden away in strictest secrecy.

The beef itself was over a sum of 10 million yen loaned but never returned apparently. Takahashi had taken Tamazawa (former Agriculture and former Defense Minister) to court in 2014 but had lost the case.

https://www.kahoku.co.jp/tohokunews/201912/20191211_33019.html

7 ( +7 / -0 )

10 million yen is a lot of money!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

”So that should clarify what type of organization the shooter belongs to, if one knows anything about post-war politics in Japan.”

Does the suspect belong to an organization of any relevance? He is a farmer, a childhood classmate of Tamazawa, says he loaned money he made from farming to Tamazawa in 1972, and that Tamazawa never paid it back, says a friend gave him the gun.

ROFL. Yep seems the type of organization he belonged to was the same high school.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Since it was a handgun that he used,

Thanks for adding that info, it changes the setup completely. It appeared at first that it was a disgruntled farmer with his licensed hunting/pest control shotgun. Then I read in a Japanese report that he had borrowed the gun from a friend, which seemed odd. Given the strict criteria for owning licensed guns in Japan, I couldn't imagine anyone simply loaning out their licensed shotgun to a friend. Although given the harsh penalties for owning an illegal handgun and ammunition, it's still amazing that any friend would loan one out.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

He borrowed a handgun from a "friend" and was disgruntled over the result of an election...not so hard to put together, especially as farmers have traditionally been a core constituency for the LDP.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Moonbloom, “was disgruntled over the result of an election...”

Well, he was apparently disgruntled over the fact that the money he loaned for campaigning purposes was never returned. That’s not necessarily the same as being disgruntled over the results of an election. And he did try to take Tamazawa to court to force him to pay but it was beyond the statute of limitations so that gave him no satisfaction.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Educator60,

Your analysis fails to take into account a key component- the borrowed handgun (as noted by other posters, not a hunting rifle).

Try finding someone to borrow a handgun from someone in Iwate ken.

You will see what type of organization he belongs to.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Wait, I thought guns were tightly controlled in Japan.

There have always been guns in Japan. I seem to remember the Mayor of Hiroshima was shot about 25 years ago.

Some of the old 1950's, 1960's black and white Japanese movies show criminals and gangsters with guns.

Gun law is tight though, which in my opinion is a good.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Not only the mayor of Hiroshima, also the mayor of Nagasaki " in a brazen attack by a gangster who was apparently enraged that the city had refused to compensate him after his car was damaged at a public works construction site."

https://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/17/world/asia/17iht-nagasaki.5.5325169.html

In other words, they are always careful to fabricate excuses to deny it has anything to do with political motives that could lead to bigger questions being asked.

And yes, the mayor of Nagasaki was openly anti-nuke.

Concerning another incident discussed in the link posted above, "In 1990, Mayor Hitoshi Motoshima was shot and seriously wounded after saying that Japan's emperor, beloved by rightists, bore some responsibility for World War II."

1 ( +1 / -0 )

moonbloom, spot on!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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