crime

Japanese tourist stabbed in Honolulu neighborhood

30 Comments

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30 Comments
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Lost in the neighborhoods in Honolulu. Me thinks he was looking to partake of a bit of the old 420 and should have taken that left at Albuquerque.
-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Stay on the yellow brick road. Japanese need to remember Hawaii is not Japan. Things are in Japanese only to get your money. Samaons are very territorial. If you don't know the locals, if you weren't invited, you better not be there.

It's not like Japan where Japanese just stare at foreigners and wonder what we do, how much money we have, and what we have for dinner. Here they just walk up and look into your life, read over your shoulder. You do that mess in America you can expect a world of hurt.

Hope the guy recovers.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

the male tourist was in a convertible with others who were apparently lost in the Palolo Valley

lost + palolo = trouble. here's a tip, if you are lost in Palolo, especially in a convertible, get the hell out of there quick!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The Japanese Department of Foreign Affairs has upgraded its advisory status on Hawaii from "Safety-Country" to "So-So."

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Since most of the population there are of Japanese decent, the suspect should look Japanese.

-13 ( +1 / -14 )

Sorry to hear about this. Japanese tourism helps keep Honolulu from going broke, so this kind of thing is really bad news. It will discourage visitors, even though it's an isolated incident and it's a bit away from the city.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Well actually, they were at the McDonald's on Waialae Avenue (which has a drive-through), which is really more Kaimuki than Palolo Valley (though it's apparently labeled the "Palolo McDonald's"). So it's not like they were driving around aimlessly in a dicey neighborhood or something.

So sorry this happened, since Kaimuki, which is just a few minutes from Waikiki, between Kapahulu and Kahala, has gotten quite popular with Japanese visitors because of its many independent restaurants (and its proximity to Waikiki). In just one block, you can choose from good Chinese, Vietnamese, Greek, Korean, Japanese, BBQ, "American" (whatever that means these days, but local-style diner food in this case), and even Himalayan food, with only a smattering of fast-food chains in between.

It's a relatively rare occurrence, though, so let's not go painting the whole town with the same brush... :-)

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Since most of the population there are of Japanese decent, the suspect should look Japanese.

Well how's that for some singularly clueless input.

Preliminary 2010 census numbers show those of Japanese and Chinese descent dropping below 40% of the population for the first time, while whites numbered around 24%, and those identifying themselves as being of two or more racial backgrounds rose to nearly a quarter of the population.

Even given the neighborhood, the suspect(s) could look like just about anyone.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I'm surprised the Japan bashers aren't on here saying it was the victim's fault, or that the victim deserved it.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

I've been to Honolulu many times and really don't think this is a "bad" area ( near Diamond Head ? ) . Maybe some posters from Hawaii can tell us more.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Poor guy!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Well that's terrible. I've been to that McDonald's a few times and never felt any danger. I guess you're never too far from anything in Hawaii though.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm sorry to say I went right by this McDonald's the other day, unarmed, for I had no idea what a dangerous place this was. It just looks like a sleepy, low-rent McDonald's across from a shopping center.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

According to the Honolulu Star Advertiser they were at a Rainbow Mini-Mart, not a McDonald's.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Honolulu Star Advertiser : http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/125224594.html

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Half way up Palolo valley is state low income housing. Pretty big Samoan population and some can get pretty violent when drinking and doing drugs. Have Samoan and Hawaiian friends and for some rowdiness is in their blood, a few are very good NFL players. I think all big cities have bad neighborhoods and in Honolulu parts of Kalihi / Chinatown, Waianae and an area in Waikiki near Liliuokalani. It's wise to research before traveling and also locals know convertibles and certain rental cars are tourist$. Aloha

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The local kanakas may be protective in their part of the 'hood, but Japanese tourists are not really viewed as a threat. The tourists can be swindled or intimidated so easily, why use a knife on them? There is something weird about this story.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Star-Advertiser keeps revising the story--this morning, the breaking story at the same URL had McDonald's, no mention of a mini-mart. Still.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Tourist agencies like JTB make it a policy to stress that the local people are all happy and accomodating, so naturally Jp tourists haven't a clue. There is actually a lot of resentment simmering in Hawaiian society due to how it has been developed for elite interests, so if you roll up in some shiny rentals, you are a target.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I hope he recovers very soon. Hawaii is a truly nice place to visit and incident like this do happen.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Gang war in sunny Honolulu?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Turns out they were trying to find their way to Tantalus (a hill way above Honolulu with great night views of the city) at 12:30 a.m., and got lost on the way... Heck, even I get lost trying to get up to Tantalus--the route through a bunch of residential neighborhoods isn't exactly well-marked--and I'd certainly never drive up there in the middle of the night...it's a lot better now, but a few years back it was a notorious place for late-night car-jackings.

Glad the guy's going to be okay, anyway!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I hope the police in Hawaii will soon catch the guy that has done this and put him away for a very long time. I just came back to Hawaii for a vacation a few weeks ago and while here, I have seen so much crime that it totally bothers me in every way. In my opinion, I think Hawaii is no longer a very safe to be while at night. In the day it may be o.k., but when night comes, it tends to get a bit dangerous. Especially if you are in the palolo area. Kalihi is also a very dangerous place to be also. Waikiki is o.k., I guess, but it is so expensive there.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Honolulu remains, statistically, one of the safest cities in the country, and--as has been the cases in all major population centers in the U.S.--major crimes there dropped steadily from 2000 through 2008. Between 2008 and 2010, however, Oahu saw increases in most major crimes as unemployment rose by nearly 50% and drastic cutbacks in state and city budgets decimated social services, crime prevention programs, and drug enforcement efforts (a significant proportion of both property and violent crimes in Hawaii are related to drugs--mostly methamphetamine/ice).

A huge increase in the homeless population has also resulted from the bad economy, and while the economic homeless do not contribute significantly to violent crime, the state's inability to put people into affordable housing has certainly contributed to the overall sense that Honolulu's neighborhoods are less safe.

So yeah, a little common sense is in order, as in any big city. Do your sightseeing to the North Shore during the day, stay away from Chinatown's bars at night, don't leave stuff in your car, avoid crazy-looking people on the street (alright, so it's hard to tell the meth users from the cell phone users these days--they're all talking to themselves) etc. etc.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Palolo valley.. what the hell were they doing up there?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

That's too bad. I am scared , because I am Japanese.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Once this story gets out be prepared for a drop in Japanese tourism to Hawaii.

Samaons are very territorial. If you don't know the locals, if you weren't invited, you better not be there.

You make them sound like some kind of inner-city gang or some kind of animal.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You make them sound like some kind of inner-city gang or some kind of animal.

Not too far from the truth. I remember when I was stationed at Pearl Harbor ('79-'82), Nanakuli Beach Park was placed off-limits by the Navy because of the increase in violence against sailors in that area - by transplanted Samoans. The incident that caused the restriction happened when two sailors on the beach were beaten to a pulp after they tried recovering some lady's purse that a Samoan kid ran off with. They cased the kid back to a couple of cars full of what would now be called your typical gang thugs of Samoan lineage. Two against eight never ends up well for the two. So yeah, animals.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

cased = chased (MAN I wish we could edit our posts)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I visited Aeia many times. Hawaii is a beautiful island. However, if you're a Japanese or foreign tourist strolling late in the night and you want to have fun, stay close to tourist area and don't carry too much cash. He probably didn't understand the command or must've mouthed off and resisted. It's not worth it, just comply and him the money. It's an isolated case, but like any other large city, it will happen again. You just have to be aware.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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