crime

Justice minister says sorry to wrongly-jailed Nepal man

20 Comments

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© 2012 AFP

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That is why there should be no excuses for false accusations which DNA testing can not only identify but eliminate others from even being at a scene.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

It's a massive problem in Japan with a mind-bogglingly simple solution: record every moment of incarceration and interrogation. Do this and watch the conviction rate fall by 30% in the first year.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

The police have too much power here. It disgusts me. There was a document floating around the web, maybe this website, in pdf form for gaijin to download with translations of phrases to use and important laws we should know, if we are ever detained by the police. Still, even that pointed out there is basically nothing we can do no matter how innocent, polite or friendly we may be to the police.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Justice Minister Makoto Taki told a press conference he was sorry that Govinda Prasad Mainali had spent so long in prison for the 1997 murder of a businesswoman-turned prostitute in Tokyo.

Wrong place to be making the apology! He owes the apology to Mainali in person and not the media! That along with a check for punitive and actual damages.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

A step in the right direction, but too small to be of any real use.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How about some compo for this Nepalese dude? 15 years is a long time to have your freedom taken away, especially in your youth.

And this Nepalese dude ain't no saint either! He was getting it on nicely with this so called businesswoman, WHILE HE WAS MARRIED AND HAD A WIFE BACK HOME. Kept changing his statements with the cops also did him no favors. No more you change your statements from one thing to another, the more you seem like a liar.

I guess for being such an arse, sometimes you can end up paying heavily and that's what happened to this fool.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

so now he is free... how did he explain to his family in nepal about his um, "condoms"?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

For what it's worth, congratulations to this guy for recovering freedom.

As for the judicial system here, well, if you are branded a witch the inquisition will make sure you burn. I blame my country's judicial system and the movies for making me used to the idea that hard facts and solid evidence decide cases. In Japan, the frowning old men's words are seen as the words of reason and experience, be them policemen, doctors, teachers or judges.

Regardless this guy's release, has justice been served yet?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

WHILE HE WAS MARRIED AND HAD A WIFE BACK HOME. Kept changing his statements with the cops also did him no favors. No more you change your statements from one thing to another, the more you seem like a liar.

WHILE HE WAS MARRIED AND HAD A WIFE BACK HOME.

I

According to stats, more than 50% married men are committing extramarital affairs in life time. Furthermore, this is irrelevant to this case.

No more you change your statements from one thing to another, the more you seem like a liar.

It can be well explained as a language barrier. Hope Japanese Judicial system provides interpreters in criminal trials for all foreigners who are accused. That's one of the basic human rights issue for fair trial. You may want to put yourself in their shoes to see what you have said here. Accused have a right to request translators or interpreters.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

And this Nepalese dude ain't no saint either! He was getting it on nicely with this so called businesswoman, WHILE HE WAS MARRIED AND HAD A WIFE BACK HOME. Kept changing his statements with the cops also did him no favors. No more you change your statements from one thing to another, the more you seem like a liar.

I guess for being such an arse, sometimes you can end up paying heavily and that's what happened to this fool.

That's no reason to land in jail for murder.

I guess the cops thought that he was suspicious. Apparently the cops go easy on you if you show remorse. But if they think that you're guilty then they will torture you and force confession out of you. But confession alone should not be used as evidence for something.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Dude needs to go to Nepal and apologize to him in person. That's the least he can do.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@thomas, remorse only works if you are Japanese,

@globewatcher, interpreters are provided by the police dept which are already biased in the case either guilty or innocent as per the interrogators guidance during questioning.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@globewatcher, interpreters are provided by the police dept which are already biased in the case either guilty or innocent as per the interrogators guidance during questioning.

Wow, It is nice to know. Oh dear...... what a mess of mess.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Forgot to add, For accused, these interpreters should be provided by the judicial court or public defender, not from police and prosecutors. This is very important.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Judicial court or public defenders, this story adds to the truth of the effectiveness of making statements and the way they are interpreted for a high conviction rate of foreigners.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

SO WHAT NOW ? Just like that Mr. Japan justice Minister? The man suffered 15 years in jail not to mention the torture Japanese prosecutor (a.k.a. KEMPETAI) did to him. A high tech country and forgot to use the DNA sampling that is SOP in a crime like this. Japanese prosecutors cannot be trusted. Most of them are newbies and need extensive training and education. Now that the same court found him not guilty, the Immigration will just throw him back home and case closed. Will Mr. Justice Minister Makoto Taki be sacked from his job for being incompetent? Is sorry enough for the 15 years this man suffered.

Lesson for foreigners..... take extra precaution while living in Japan and avoid committing any crime even a simple Battery. Your ass will be fired by the spin doctor prosecutors.

I guess it about time Japan revised their system and constitution.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Wrong place to be making the apology! He owes the apology to Mainali in person and not the media! That along with a check for punitive and actual damages.

Yes, I agree. I would like to see him take his media circus to the middle of a very mucky potholed dusty road in the back streets of Kathmandu, kneel down and kiss the earth at Mainali's feet to show his "sincere remorse". It's Japanese culture. Anything less is just another slap in the face for the victim. Oh, and then put his money where his mouth is. Then he can put in motion all the necessary reforms of the Japanese injustice system. And when he's done, resign to take responsibility for all the trouble Japanese injustice has caused.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

They should compensate him big time! Say US$10million for each year + 1 whip/ year on the backside of the judges for wrongful convictions + the prosecutor & the police should be jailed for 15 months. Then these people will learn how precious is life & freedom.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Another reason why all interogations should be taped and lawyers present.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

No, he's not sorry. Pay him at least 1 oku / each year of detention, THEN say you're sorry.

Then, fire all the incompetent prosecutors, that destroyed this man's life, and make them pay through their noses for this blunder.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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