crime

University professor arrested for stealing women’s underwear

32 Comments

Police in Ichikawa, Chiba Prefecture, said Monday they have arrested a 56-year-old professor at Keio University on suspicion of stealing women’s underwear.

According to police, the suspect, Seimei Shiratori, stole a bra and panties from a balcony clothesline on the first floor of an apartment building in Ichikawa at around 2:20 p.m. Sunday, Sankei Shimbun reported.

He was seen stealing the underwear by the 38-year-old woman’s husband who chased him and caught him, while the woman called 110.

According to Keio University’s home page, Shiratori has been teaching in the Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics of the Science and Engineering Faculty since 2014.

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32 Comments
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Stupid is as stupid does

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Don't get your knickets in a twist.

It's sad but not dangerous

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Another Peter Pan and an adolescent in mind.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

It's sad but not dangerous

Exactly. He has a mental health issue - and as far as we know he hasn't hurt anyone apart from missing undergarments. His career and life are ruined. No need to form a lynch mob.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

This professor needs treatment. Sadly most people who have a fetish never seek treatment from professionals. Be grateful if you and your loved ones or friends don't suffer with mental disorder or any other mental illness and have compassion on those that do. The ignorance about mental illnesses leads to unfair and factless based stigmas being placed upon the mentally ill. There are still many people with uninformed perceptions about mental illness and other psychological disorders and still need to be educated about it.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Hmm, he was teaching applied physics. Perhaps he wanted them for an experiment.

stealing underwear is not something fine for a thrill. It is a mental illness.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I really don't get the allure of stealing women's underwear. I know it's not a niche fetish but considering how many cases have involved guys stealing women's underwear, it's something.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Another sexually frustrated loser in the world of Japanese academia who's wasted his life studying and never gotten out into the real world to meet real women.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Stealing underwear isn't harmless. It's very unnerving to know that some man has been outside your apartment and is sexualizing you, even if it's from a distance. We have no way of knowing whether the man might come back, break in, or even wait around outside and try to attack or grope us. In fact, many serial killers begin their careers as peepers or stealing undergarments. Obviously, not all men who do these things go on to become murders of women, but it's something women are forced to consider. This is why I don't, and never will, live in a first or even second floor apartment. This type of crime is not amusing, nor should it be dismissed as harmless.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Becoming a physics professor at Keio is not easy. You need to be very good, then put a lot of work in building your career. And to throw all this work away for a pair of panties, this is really a mental issue.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

An incomprehensible crime committed from impulses which are incomprehensible to those of us who don't suffer from this fetish. To throw everything away that you've achieved, to be ridiculed by strangers and to have your own loved ones ashamed of and embarrassed by you, all over something that really, harmed no-one.

I feel sorry for the guy.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

We have no way of knowing whether the man might come back, break in, or even wait around outside and try to attack or grope us. In fact, many serial killers begin their careers as peepers or stealing undergarments.

You have no way of knowing what anyone might do. And many crack addicts started out by by smoking weed. You see how pointless these conjectures are? Shall we throw every man in prison, just in case? The fact remains, he stole undergarments, nothing more as far as anyone knows. Everything else is imagination.

I agree it's not amusing. And it's discomforting. That's why he was arrested. But to rail on as though he's Jack the Ripper, or to make fun of him... these things are not reasonable or kind.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Can't you buy used underwear in Japan? Vaguely remember seeing something about vending machines for that.

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/the-love-machine/ says it is true.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Talking about pointlessness?

You have no way of knowing what anyone might do. And many crack addicts started out by by smoking weed. You see how pointless these conjectures are?

And here you are assuming he has a mental illness without proof. Crack addicts don't start with weed either.

fetish =/= mental illness. Prancing around the bush ignoring the likelyhood that maybe he's just a bad person.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Professor Shiratori's residence is located only 500 metres from the victim's apartment.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Since when was the suspect diagnosed with a mental illness ?

Sure there is kleptomania but that do not make any robber someone suffering from a mental illness.

Is it because he is suspected to have stolen women underwear ? Will it be also dismissed if smartphone were the target ?

All of these can be legally bought and sell. No need for robbery.

Perhaps the act was commit on impulse but that do not make it go to mental illness spectrum.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Professor Shirator's website. He may be famous enough to keep his job.

https://www.appi.keio.ac.jp/shiratori/

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Talking about pointlessness?

" You have no way of knowing what anyone might do. And many crack addicts started out by by smoking weed. You see how pointless these conjectures are? "

And here you are assuming he has a mental illness without proof. Crack addicts don't start with weed either.

fetish =/= mental illness. Prancing around the bush ignoring the likelyhood that maybe he's just a bad person.

you know how this started ... the post by @commanteer was a reply to @girl_in_tokyo (a person with extreme feminist views (probably close to a radical feminist) ), which was already talking about "breaking in", "attacking" and "serial killers". this man is 56 years old, and a Japanese. combine "56 years old" with "Japanese" and "stealing women,s underwear" and that couldn,t be more far from a "serial killer" or a "violent man". mental illness or not, this man is just one among many, in Japan (unfortunately but that,s how it is). ( i mean, did we forgot that this is Japan we,re talking about? ) would i call him a bad person? i don,t think so. actually i feel bad for him, and maybe that,s why many people tend to say that he, and all the others, might have some sort of mental illness. now the next thing we should do is look at the statistics and see how many of these hundreds of thousands of Japanese perverts will (at some point in their lives) seriously attack some woman or become serial killers.

We have no way of knowing whether the man might come back, break in, or even wait around outside and try to attack or grope us. In fact, many serial killers begin their careers as peepers or stealing undergarments. Obviously, not all men who do these things go on to become murders of women, but it's something women are forced to consider. This is why I don't, and never will, live in a first or even second floor apartment. This type of crime is not amusing, nor should it be dismissed as harmless.

i suggest the following: drink some chamomile tea and chill. stop sounding victimy every time you comment in JT. the world is not so bad as you think it is.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Physicist, heal thyself...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

fetish =/= mental illness

We are not talking about a fetish. We are talking about acting in an inappropriate, illegal and dangerous manner to satisfy the fetish. That suggests a mental health issue.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The stealing of women's underwear is very disturbing to the victims and leaves a mental scar. They don't know who it is. Next door neighbor or stranger. Will they go further. It's not some innocent victimless crime. It's a violation of personal space.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

If it the crime causes the victim to live in fear of rapists, stalkers, and serial killers, there is no doubt that is a part of the crime. Anyone who makes light of such effects is superannuated and depreciates psychology. It is simple minded to think a compensation of ¥1000 for two undergarments would suffice.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

This is a classic story in Japan. An exclusive from Japan. The land of stealing underwear.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

People (men) who steal underwear are almost always doing so because of a fixation on the underwear itself, they're not doing so as a prelude to more violent actions. It's a fetish, and it's also a crime. I can understand why women would feel unease at being the victim of an underwear thief, but the crime itself is not a violent one and people should keep the seriousness of it in proportion. For anyone to regard this professor, for instance, as though he were the same as a rapist, stalker or serial killer is pretty much literally a hysterical reaction and gives too much credibility to cod psychology and moral panic.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

People (men) who steal underwear are almost always doing so because of a fixation on the underwear itself, they're not doing so as a prelude to more violent actions. It's a fetish, and it's also a crime. I can understand why women would feel unease at being the victim of an underwear thief, but the crime itself is not a violent one and people should keep the seriousness of it in proportion. For anyone to regard this professor, for instance, as though he were the same as a rapist, stalker or serial killer is pretty much literally a hysterical reaction and gives too much credibility to cod psychology and moral panic.

common sense . . . . . .

i,d give you 30 thumbs up for that, if i could ...

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Lesson for today... If you are going to steal underwear, get in shape first so that you can outrun a husband.

I am waiting for the photo of underwear laid out on tarps from past thefts.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

rcch,

thanks for the comment, judging by the comments overall it does look like the majority of people aren't joining the lynch mob on this guy. A small victory for common sense, then.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

People (men) who steal underwear are almost always doing so because of a fixation on the underwear itself, they're not doing so as a prelude to more violent actions. It's a fetish, and it's also a crime. I can understand why women would feel unease at being the victim of an underwear thief, but the crime itself is not a violent one and people should keep the seriousness of it in proportion. For anyone to regard this professor, for instance, as though he were the same as a rapist, stalker or serial killer is pretty much literally a hysterical reaction and gives too much credibility to cod psychology and moral panic.

There is a distinction of what it is and the effect on women. Obviously it does not instill the phobia in you. If a victim as a result develops such fear, whether they should or should not, is the effect of the crime itself. As you've written, it causes hysteria and as you alluded the lost of common sense, both of which is the result of the crime.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Another sex case.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Can't he just go to the vending machines and buy them?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Don't put panties outside

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I know Keio well, as I am a retired professor of the institution...I appreciate the comments of those who express compassion for Shiratori as suffering from mental illness. (That is not to deny that he is not in the least responsible for what he has confessed to doing.) I can say with some confidence that his former employer will regard his greatest crime as that of embarrassing Keio, whose faculty members, administrators, and students tend to have a very lofty opinion of themselves...Those readers who see this sad incident as a further excuse to sneer at Japanese culture as somehow producing and nurturing strange fetishes should consider the general human condition.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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