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Family of dead Sri Lankan urge Japanese immigration center to fully disclose video

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As much as it should morally be fully disclosed, I highly doubt that it will be.

Japan does not want a PR firestorm, so it will be buried, unless they can get some momentum behind them.

Sadly, nobody else in a place of power seems to be rooting for their cause, strangely enough it’s election time, but it also Japan.

11 ( +22 / -11 )

Good for them! May she get justice and the guilty parties get genuine punishments not some demotion or wage cut for 3 months. Release the tapes!!!!

13 ( +23 / -10 )

And so the dreamy image of Japan goes on... Well done Japan: only good light shines upon you. But many of us know the dark side of the moon, too;)

12 ( +23 / -11 )

If there is nothing to hide, they should.

23 ( +28 / -5 )

As much as it should morally be fully disclosed, I highly doubt that it will be.

Japan does not want a PR firestorm, so it will be buried, unless they can get some momentum behind them.

Sadly, nobody else in a place of power seems to be rooting for their cause, strangely enough it’s election time, but it also Japan.

Don't you know CDPJ 7 manifestos include the one full disclosure of the video footage? Vote for that party

if you believe full disclosure is the most important for the country

4 ( +11 / -7 )

The family should file a civil suit against the immigration authorities for wrongful death and demand the full video via discovery.

This is simply further evidence of how farcical the Japanese “justice” system is.

14 ( +26 / -12 )

Interesting @P.Smith 5:37p. In what specific jurisdiction would they be heard fairly? And also, not sure if the same “rights to discovery’ in criminal and civil matters would apply in Japan.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

If I recall correctly, the detention facility said that the footage was "deleted or lost"? I thought I read that here a while back?

8 ( +11 / -3 )

And I got downvoted a few days ago when I commented about Japan's Human Rights...

4 ( +13 / -9 )

snowymountainhellToday  05:42 pm JST

Interesting @P.Smith 5:37p. In what specific jurisdiction would they be heard fairly?

Not Japan, that’s for sure.

And also, not sure if the same “rights to discovery’ in criminal and civil matters would apply in Japan

The ability to discover evidence here is much more limited than in fully developed democracies, which is not a big surprise.

https://www.kojimalaw.jp/en/articles/0004

Good catch, Snowy.

4 ( +15 / -11 )

Nice place, but you better tote the line' Keep your paperwork in order.

Here, it their way or the airways back home. and you Japanese authorities are never going take the heat'

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Wishma's younger sister Wayomi, 28, said the response of the agency was regrettable

I doubt that is an accurate translation. Barbaric, primitive, medieval, idiotic, brain dead maybe.

12 ( +15 / -3 )

The family should file a civil suit against the immigration authorities for wrongful death and demand the full video via discovery.

This is simply further evidence of how farcical the Japanese “justice” system is.

I believe Agent(s)(for the family, either Japanese lawyer or NGO) has already done.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Perhaps basic free speech, especially about “human rights’ & specific ‘political parties’ are NOT a basic ‘human right’ here and In Japan @Scorpion 5:45pm:

*- “**And I got downvoted a few days ago when I commented about Japan's Human Rights...” -*

Nothing is ‘a right’ for its citizens, and especially, for foreigners in Japan. Like this media, we are guests and have to play by their ‘rules’, however ambiguous the laws and rules may be at times.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

They will never willingly show the recording.

Next you'll hear how it was accidentally deleted.

8 ( +13 / -5 )

The world needs to know how ruthless the Japanese government is

3 ( +11 / -8 )

Considering that the victim died in her prison cell, the entire stall must take responsibility and be punished. When that is made known watch the staff break ranks and start blaming each other. That is when real justice will start.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

I really hope that influential foreign media outlets like BBC, Al jazeera, La Monde et al pick this story up and expose what is happening.

"Gaiatsu" (foreign pressure) is what exposed the Itai Itai byo caused by mercury poisoning and the Lockheed corruption scandal that brought down Tanaka Kakuei.

Time to apply "gaiatsu" again!!!!

I will give credit to NHK for following this story pretty closely, but it is having no impact.

gary

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Urge, schmurge.

Get a lawyer and sue; video evidence subpoenaed.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

kennyGToday  06:02 pm JST

> I believe Agent(s)(for the family, either Japanese lawyer or NGO) has already done.

Thanks for this info., KennyG. As Snowy pointed out, pretrial discovery here is extremely limited, so it probably wouldn’t be a successful way for the family to see the video.

Certainly there is mechanism to get this info in front if a judge.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

A damn shame. She was cute and had a bright future ahead of her.

Nevertheless, you ''commit the crime and do the time''. While I do not condone the unfortunately negligent events that transpired, she was fully aware that she was breaking the law. One does not remain illegally as an expatriate when one's visa is set to expire. You either leave the country, sort out your visa status, or accept the consequences.

There are plenty of foreigners languishing in, for example, Thai prisons, some of whom die just like Wishma did. No tears of outrage there. Perhaps because they weren't women.

-10 ( +7 / -17 )

I agree this is a case that requires much wider coverage in the international media. The only way to force the hand of the entrenched bureaucratic intransigence.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

And what would happen to a Japanese who overstayed their visa in Sri Lanka ? Nothing pleasant I assume. Why should she get preferential treatment ?

-7 ( +9 / -16 )

...much wider coverage in the international media

No, it doesn't. She broke the law, plain and simple. What happened to her was unfortunate, but she shouldn't have overstayed her visa in the first place.

-2 ( +13 / -15 )

Cruel and inhumane bastards!

4 ( +10 / -6 )

If it’s uncomfortable to release what happened, then it’s actions by the staff that are less then comfortable.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

lolozo79Today  07:15 pm JST

...much wider coverage in the international media 

No, it doesn't. She broke the law, plain and simple. What happened to her was unfortunate, but she shouldn't have overstayed her visa in the first place.

Comments like this are surprisingly cold hearted and inhumane.

Shame on you.

1 ( +12 / -11 )

This case will tarnish the very same image Japan as nation and Japanese companies are trying to promote after having pulled of a successful Olympics, this matter should have been solved long ago so the family and the immigration department can close the case and move forward, this stonewalling and stubbornness will only make matters worse.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Cruel and inhumane bastards

I suppose you are well versed in the Sri Lankan legal system to assume that foreigners who overstay their visas are given 5 star hotel accommodation.

Comments like this are...inhumane

Well, I guess I live in the real world where I accept the fact that unfortunate things do happen. Like I said, she shouldn't have stayed in the country illegally. Where's the outrage over those who have been incarcerated due to a corrupt legal system ? Plenty of those around the world. I spare my "humanity" for those unfortunate souls, for example, in Afghanistan, Myanmar and North Korea who have committed no real crimes.

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

Nonsense. The family should bring a suit immediately against the J-govt and Immigration Bureau, and demand the Court secure the full video under Shoko Hozon, on grounds that it may be destroyed or erased.

There is strong reason to suspect extreme negligence on the part of immigration leading to death. Immigration law violation is indeed a crime and there are protocols in place. Causing the unecessary death of the undocumented immmigrant is not one of them.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

No, I don't think so, that will never happen..

And so the dreamy image of Japan goes on... Well done Japan: only good light shines upon you. But many of us know the dark side of the moon, too;)

Funny to read comments from people who left Japan and are still resentful complaining about everything bad in Japan, so they feel better about themselves.

Nevertheless, you ''commit the crime and do the time''. While I do not condone the unfortunately negligent events that transpired, she was fully aware that she was breaking the law. One does not remain illegally as an expatriate when one's visa is set to expire. You either leave the country, sort out your visa status, or accept the consequences.

And what would happen to a Japanese who overstayed their visa in Sri Lanka ? Nothing pleasant I assume. Why should she get preferential treatment ?

No, it doesn't. She broke the law, plain and simple. What happened to her was unfortunate, but she shouldn't have overstayed her visa in the first place.

That's right, it was a very unfortunate event that should never have happened. If there is someone responsible, must face a trial or whatever it takes..

However, she broke the law, wanted to overstay in Japan and it is not allowed, mistakes and doing things wrong bring bad consequences, sometimes tragedies.

If she had done things well, she would be alive and in her country.

Japan is not for everyone, is a country of laws and they must be complied with otherwise you will pay the consequences, If you do things right, Japan will be good to you.

Follow the law, do things right, be legal, study, work, be a good Gaijin and you can live well in Japan..

-4 ( +10 / -14 )

If the immigration detention center had nothing to hide they wouldn't be going to such lengths to stonewall the family and their lawyer from gaining access to the footage.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

My question to all of the posters why was she in the detention center? Answer she overstayed her VISA. Rules are Rules you are in a country as a guest. When you enter with a Visa you are simply saying you will obey those rules. Why is it that now a days people are quick to look at the mere fact that caused the action. Lets say she got sick on the plane on her way back to Sri Lanka and the pilot didn't return the plane to the airport. Do you blame the pilot or the carrier? Why is it that what seems to be WRONG is made and accepted as being RIGHT? Yes, she died in Japan, people die every day for the same reasons, you can't simply go to a country and do what you want to do. Rules are rules had she not overstayed her Visa we wouldn't be reading or posting about this.

-5 ( +7 / -12 )

lolozo79Today  07:07 pm JST

And what would happen to a Japanese who overstayed their visa in Sri Lanka ? Nothing pleasant I assume. Why should she get preferential treatment ?

Receiving the proper medical attention when you are seriously ill is not preferential treatment. It's a basic human right. Even serial killers and mass murderers get medical attention in prison. You either don't even know what preferential treatment means or are just plain ignorant.

Yes, let's compare the standard of Japan, the 3rd largest economy in the world and a global leader with a developing third world nation like Sri Lanka. What a dumb comparison.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Nothing is ‘a right’ for its citizens, and especially, for foreigners in Japan. Like this media, we are guests and have to play by their ‘rules’, however ambiguous the laws and rules may be at times.

Did you just try to justify her death? This totally sounds like you did!

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

...it was a very unfortunate event that should never have happened

However, she broke the law, wanted to overstay in Japan and it is not allowed

Exactly. I'm pretty sure it isn't allowed in the majority of countries.

Rules are Rules you are in a country as a guest.

Finally, some folks who can see the forest for the trees. I would never consider running through the streets of, say, Riyadh waving a whisky bottle. I'd be aware of and would respect the laws of the country.

If it had been a fifty-something, overweight, balding male Sri Lankan, we wouldn't be talking about this.

Funny thing is, I wonder why her family didn't reach out to her before she was detained.

>

-8 ( +4 / -12 )

Using 1/2 of someone’s post to make a wrongful accusation @Scorpion 9:02pm? IF you had read and reasonably understood, I was supporting You in calling out Your earlier complaint of unfair censorship. (Don’t try to make an adversary when there’s one.)

We BOTH know she was wronged.

*- @snowymountainhell 6:02pm:n “**Perhaps basic free speech, especially about “human rights’ & specific ‘political parties’ are NOT a basic ‘human right’ here and In Japan @Scorpion 5:45pm: [“And I got downvoted a few days ago when I commented about Japan's Human Rights...”]NNothing is ‘a right’ for its citizens, and especially, [@Scorpion 5:45pm] **for [us] foreigners in Japan. Like [within] this media, we are guests and have to play by their ‘rules’, however ambiguous the laws and rules may be at times.” -*

Next time, IF you’re so certain.about your accusation, then clearly state THAT user’s name and the FULL context it was rendered. Expected better. An apology or, at least, an acknowledgement will suffice.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

… when there’s NOT one…

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

kaimycahl

My question to all of the posters why was she in the detention center? Answer she overstayed her VISA. Rules are Rules you are in a country as a guest

I did not see anybody who said otherwise. However, once she was detained, the authorities have responsibility to take care of her health. Detention should not be a death penalty.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Am so glad I do not have a visa and issues as such.

Not really sure why the girl died, but she should have immediately went to immigration before her visa expired. One must follow the rules.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Receiving the proper medical attention when you are seriously ill ... is a basic human right.

Tell that to the Uyghurs in Xinjiang and the political detainees in North Korea. It is "a basic human right" only because you were raised in a western society where this was/is the norm.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

The crux of the article is not whether she should have overstayed her visa or not - that's another story - but whether or not she received urgently required medical help.

Offenders in prisons are afforded basic care (always?). Who would say a person detained in prison for a minor crime like theft for example she be left to die if a serious medical condition arose - because like, " well you shouldn't have done the crime."

Be real.

The whole thing is about the professionalism of the said authorities re duty of care of people in detention.

They failed and the dept has blood on it's hands.

This is 2021 and the world is connected. Showa rules just won't cut it, unless you enjoy being outed at any moment.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

I want to see the officials who failed to help Wishma tried for negligent homicide and (if convicted) serving a serious prison sentence. Of course, the full video should be released to the family. There is no excuse for anyone to die in prison while being refused medical care. It's even more egregious in this case because she was only a detainee, not a convict.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

So there still people which are not aware that Japan do not apply death penalty by medical care refusal to visa over-stayer. That law do not exist. If you overstay your visa : you can be detained, deported, fined, ... . The option left to die by denial of medical care does not exist. Japan has signed, most likely several, stuff incompatible with the existence of that option.

And she was initially on a student visa. She never was a guest. She was not invited by Japan to free load. She had to pay her taxes, follow the laws, ... or not, and if not face the consequences as stated by law in accordance with constitution, declaration, ... national and international the government choose to sign and kept its sign valid on.

If you want to use a house metaphor : a foreign resident is more like a spouse marrying in a family. They are part of the family, share duty, hapiness, sorrow, hardship ... they were not always there and perhaps at some point thing will turn sour and they will leave but for as long as they are part of the family : they are part of the family.

After, if you personally think you are a guest, act like one and expect to be treated as one, it is your choice. I would appreciate you do not involve every other foreign resident. And I must say if you find normal to let your guest to die slowly and painfully without medical care if for one reason or another they fall ill including doing something you told them not to do, I will gladly reject all your invitation. Please do not bother, thank you.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

I may even agree with the rest; however;

"If you want to use a house metaphor : a foreign resident is more like a spouse marrying in a family. They are part of the family, share duty, hapiness, sorrow, hardship ... they were not always there and perhaps at some point thing will turn sour and they will leave but for as long as they are part of the family : they are part of the family."

How is this applicable?!

She was not a resident; she was an over-stayer.

Japan must change the Law(s) to allow for forced deportations.

Just like other more beautiful, super cool Nations, ultra-developed, outside the box, rational thinkers out there.

I am from a country that deports foreign nationals; lots of "experts" from the same country post here daily.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

I'll be blunt - my sympathies are mostly not with Wishma. As everyone knows, there's actually already a report out. Sure, it's the government's version but it still has far more details than you can get off either the newspaper or whiny relatives. It documents Wishma's less than honorable behavior before she finally turned herself in, her early wish to depart, the failure of her family to stay in contact and puke up the 200,000 yen that's needed for her air transit, the similar failure of the Sri Lankan embassy to do that either, then she met someone from a "rights group" and all of a sudden she wanted to stay (how despicable, these rights groups). It details all the medical attention she did receive during all the time there, none of which suggested she was in life-threatening danger.

If you read the report, you'll come to a new understanding of how hard it'll be to assemble a solid lawsuit. Sure, there were some procedural abbreviations, but let's face it this kind of thing is pretty common in organizations that have been running for a long time, and the substantive circumstances are such that it's unlikely her disposition would have changed if they were because the known facts just weren't in her favor.

Murder? Far from it. Discrimination? It's not necessarily to refer to racism for her low credibility with her staff. Because her own previous actions already provide all the substantiation required.

-7 ( +5 / -12 )

lolozo79Sep. 10  07:53 pm JST

Well, I guess I live in the real world where I accept the fact that unfortunate things do happen. Like I said, she shouldn't have stayed in the country illegally. Where's the outrage over those who have been incarcerated due to a corrupt legal system ? Plenty of those around the world. I spare my "humanity" for those unfortunate souls, for example, in Afghanistan, Myanmar and North Korea who have committed no real crimes.

An unusual way to describe manslaughter.

In civilized societies the victim's family would expect justice to be carried out. Not swept under the carpet.

It's becoming clearer to the world just why Ghosn ran for his life, literally.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

I've just sent a link about this case to the BBC, hopefully they'll pick it up.

Might I suggest that everyone who feels for the victim and her family also try to get this story picked up abroad by sending links of it to editors everywhere.

This simply cannot be allowed to get swept under the carpet. We must do what we can to bring this to global attention, especially now that the elections are upon us.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

I've just sent a link about this case to the BBC, hopefully they'll pick it up.

The BBC couldn't care less about a story like this. It's too busy gushing about HMS Queen Elizabeth making a port call at the cosplay capital of the world.

"Our friendship and mutual support with Japan, blah, blah, blah...)

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Tell that to the Uyghurs in Xinjiang and the political detainees in North Korea.

Except this is JapanToday and not Xijiang/NorthKoreaToday.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

lolozo79

so no visa means she deserve to die? Really? Who did she harm. Me? No? You? No? Well, nobody really. She broke the rules but there was more to it: DV, bf restraining her and stealing her money. She had no money and place to go, that's how she overstayed her visa. And for comparison that old gentlemen in Ikebukuro got just 5years in prison...he killed two people...still on no visa =death ok? People who are paying tax in Japan should be angry. This should not happen. She should be deported not be dead.

Scorpion

No they lost some reports. Video they have but refuse to show that because: safety policy AND respecting privacy and dignity of Wishma Sandamali. Well, they didn't care of her dignity when she was alive so it surely lookr, they don't want people see what they have done...

3 ( +7 / -4 )

A spokesperson for the Immigration Services Agency of Japan said . . . Or, the Immigration Services Agency of Japan declined to . . . Or, a request for comment to the Immigration Services Agency of Japan wasn't . . .

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

@Peeping_Tom

The metaphor is regarding the use of guest to qualify foreign resident.

She did not came in Japan as an over-stayer. She came as a student and at some point become an over-stayer. She was a resident of Japan part of the time a legal one another part of the time an illegal one. Be you consider guest or spouse is independent of being legal or illegal.

Just like other more beautiful, super cool Nations, ultra-developed, outside the box, rational thinkers out there.

What others countries have to do with Japan laws ? I am pretty sure they are happy you find them more beautiful than Japan but I do not see the point.

I am from a country that deports foreign nationals

I wonder how they manage to get people to be deported to pay for their how deportation. Frankly speaking, I always found that idea stupid. Offering the option to someone leave by their own mean in Japan of some special advantage to save money, why not. Requesting if of everyone, sound stupid.

We can also compare the whole immigration system when we are at it but that is not the point neither of my post.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

I would like to see the videos to understand what actually transpired during those contested moments.

I don't condone the alleged treatment of Wishma but Japan is very strict in terms of immigration and has always been so. It's a very nice place for foreigners to live and work until they break the law. Like any country, including the U.S., over staying your visa will get you in serious trouble. What Wishma should have done was to have gone to the immigration office before her visa had expired and explained her whatever reason to not or unable to renew her visa, not neglect it. It would of made a difference. I think she was naive to think not seriously about the severity in neglecting her visa. But nonetheless, it is a tragedy.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Japan must change the law to state that detainees life is worthless.

Good luck trying to lure young workers in the country!

1 ( +7 / -6 )

While it is unfortunate that this person died, her relatives have no legal standing to be making demands of the Japanese government.

As guests in a foreign country , they are obligated to respect the laws and customs of the host country, and expect and accept the consequences should they fail to comply.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

@Danielsan

Your lack of empathy is chilling.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Japan is no more corrupt than any other country, in my opinion. The problem is that they just do not care about people, and I also mean the Japanese themselves.

Nothing can be done to bring this woman back, but a whole lot can be done to make sure that this does NOT happen again. Lawsuits should be filed, people in charge of the immigration system should be punished, protests again and again should be held to make those who are responsible for this act understand their mistakes.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Tell that to the Uyghurs in Xinjiang and the political detainees in North Korea.

Except this is JapanToday and not Xijiang/NorthKoreaToday.

Not to mention that China doesn't pretend to be a democratic state.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

As I posted earlier, many people still focusing on her overstaying her visa as the crime being talked about in the article.

Regardless of her "crime", this story is about affording life-saving health care to an ill person in custody so as to speak.

Simply the staff failed in their duties.

The same as police or prison officers would have been deemed negligent if a detainee was treated the same.

This is not the first case. There have been documented problems with the facility's running for some time now.

This time the proverbial hit the fan, a person died and concerned folks are not letting it go.

It's not about her pre-custodial past.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

browny1Today  05:16 pm JST

Simply the staff failed in their duties.

Like a poster said, read official reports and come back. Or define the official duties of those staff

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Last time they said it was technically impossible. Even then, I wondered what was impossible about handing them a USB with video evidence.

I don't get the comparison to Thai prisons, just as I don't get the "but she broke the law so she was rightfully detained and in jail" arguments. But few people realise that she was not convicted and could have been banned from Japan for a period of time straight away.Instead, they let her spend time in jail. Where she eventually died for failure to provide proper care. She did not have to die in prison for such an offence as forfeiting her visa. It confuses punishment and negligence with the consequence of death. Also, the comparison with Thai prison is completely false - this is not Thailand and even we pretend we are somehow advanced.

They will most likely never get the video. Not because it is, according to the official statement, impossible or difficult, but because it would be evidence. And no one here wants to lose face, no one is ever responsible for anything, and no one wants to be held accountable.

It will turn out as it usually does - some random official (who may not even have anything to do with it) will apologize, bow a few times, someone will express sympathy for what happened, another will say that those responsible will have their pay cut by a third for a month, another group will create some infantile mascot promoting "stay safe in jail" and a mascot promoting "watch out for the validity of your visa".

To show some activity, brochures will be produced in foreign languages warning foreigners not to let their visas lapse, otherwise it would be illegal to stay. What does it matter that this is not a solution or prevention of what has happened.

I am sure it will be like this based on the fact that the local media has been virtually unreported on this incident. And if they do, the narrative is that she was here illegally. Then the media show statistics on how many foreigners are here illegally, how many foreigners are committing crimes. Possibly drug information. Totally different narrative than the original information about someone who died in prison because they were there illegally and not, for example, for murder.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@browny1Sep. 11 05:16 pm JST

Regardless of her "crime", this story is about affording life-saving health care to an ill person in custody so as to speak.

I'll tell you the real irony of the case. At least according to the report, it seems that the medical attention she did receive was her doom. Because Wishma actually did start to look pretty bad her last couple of days. Bad enough that if she wasn't previously checked out, the staff will have carted her over to the nearby hospital, if only because no one needs a dead body on their watch.

Unfortunately, she was just checked out on Thursday and the docs indicate that there is nothing life-threatening that requires immediate hospitalization. The staff will thus rely on the doctor's assessment and conclude that whatever they are seeing Wishma will keep until the following Monday. Then she rolled over on Saturday.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It is plainly clear that Japan is once again, by preventing the release of the video in its entirety, showing how democratic a place it is...not! Japan is not a democracy as we intend it in the West. At best is a mild oligarchy infused with regime like behind the scenes actions, run by a stubborn democratically uneducated elite who is only bent on showing what the country is really not. Thanks to the internet, these attempt at hiding a bitter reality are nowadays a mere confirmation of how things badly work in Japan. More often that not on foreign press websites I read stories depicting the sad face of this beautiful country of which its people are still reluctant to conform to twenty-first century standards on human rights, workers conditions, women rights and the list can go on and on, disabilities, racial minorities are just two of the subjects that spring up to my mind now. Our role as educated, good democratic citizens is to bring these shameful news to the attention of the West, tell your friends, post on social media, write to foreign press entities (newspapers,TV channels, etc).

The most honourable thing the Japanese government should do is, not to release the video, but to terminate the contract of those employees responsible for the death of this young girl, if responsible they were and strap them of their pension rights, just like it would happen in any other mature democracy, which sadly Japan is not.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

@ Bokuda

"Japan must change the law to state that detainees life is worthless.

Good luck trying to lure young workers in the country! "

Bokuda you're right, but sadly all Japan is able to attract now is low quality immigration from emerging economies, young workers from Nepal, Vietnam or Sri Lanka who most likely will not stay, cannot stay and will not wish to stay anyway once they make enough money to go back to a country whose economy will be in a more advanced state that when they left. That is what happened with Thai nationals, they're not coming anymore, why should they now? Europeans of course aren't coming bar a few manga enthusiasts. Soon Vietnamese too will find their currency strong enough to make a stint in Japan worthless and so the JP government will go and look elsewhere, there's an infinite reserve of youngsters in Africa still willing to come. Going back to the present influx of migrants, they don't enjoy freedom of speech or high human rights standards in their own country, therefore Japan to their eyes looks like a much better place to be in. The old dragons in charge here know that full well, that is why they offer those time limited visa to these poor fellas, who unlike us, need to come here and work. and are extremely grateful with their ¥1,000 an hour. Let's face it, not many of us came here in the first place because of a lack of opportunities back home. We came because we liked Japan or had a girlfriend and all looked beautiful. It's only when you start assessing the fairness of the place, the rights afforded to non Japanese nationals that you start wondering how possible it is that the same country you so much loved, is in fact nothing more than a forced and reluctant democracy whose nasty feudal head keeps rearing out! As I said before, this is the best place to be in if you have money enough to stay at home, not working, in a perpetual state of vacation, mentally too. If you stop looking for fairness and leave your ideology behind, you'll be happy here. It's a choice I had to make. By not being a politically active member of society here, you can be a much happier person and at the end, is that not what the average Japanese citizen does? Always withdrawing from expressing one's views, always being boringly alined with mainstream thought? That is political withdrawn. Japanese society is a dream subject for any Western sociologist, but can be a nightmare for an inquisitive, thinking Western mind.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

@egalite

Post of the month, I’d say….

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Complete disclosure includes highly private pictures if you know what I mean. These two sisters really want the entire public to watch them to accuse Japan??? I doubt it. How come they could suddenly afford to fly over here despite they haven't done anything when she really needed their help? Those NGO including so-called human rights lawyers behind these sisters are really the one we should focus on

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Bokuda you're right, but sadly all Japan is able to attract now is low quality immigration from emerging economies, young workers from Nepal, Vietnam or Sri Lanka who most likely will not stay, cannot stay and will not wish to stay anyway once they make enough money to go back to a country whose economy will be in a more advanced state that when they left. That is what happened with Thai nationals, they're not coming anymore, why should they now? Europeans of course aren't coming bar a few manga enthusiasts. Soon Vietnamese too will find their currency strong enough to make a stint in Japan worthless and so the JP government will go and look elsewhere, there's an infinite reserve of youngsters in Africa still willing to come. Going back to the present influx of migrants, they don't enjoy freedom of speech or high human rights standards in their own country, therefore Japan to their eyes looks like a much better place to be in. The old dragons in charge here know that full well, that is why they offer those time limited visa to these poor fellas, who unlike us, need to come here and work. and are extremely grateful with their ¥1,000 an hour. Let's face it, not many of us came here in the first place because of a lack of opportunities back home. We came because we liked Japan or had a girlfriend and all looked beautiful. It's only when you start assessing the fairness of the place, the rights afforded to non Japanese nationals that you start wondering how possible it is that the same country you so much loved, is in fact nothing more than a forced and reluctant democracy whose nasty feudal head keeps rearing out! As I said before, this is the best place to be in if you have money enough to stay at home, not working, in a perpetual state of vacation, mentally too. If you stop looking for fairness and leave your ideology behind, you'll be happy here. It's a choice I had to make. By not being a politically active member of society here, you can be a much happier person and at the end, is that not what the average Japanese citizen does? Always withdrawing from expressing one's views, always being boringly alined with mainstream thought? That is political withdrawn. Japanese society is a dream subject for any Western sociologist, but can be a nightmare for an inquisitive, thinking Western mind.

I could understand how you feel. Please think and tell your fellows " There's not such thing like Japanese dream just like there was not " American dream" for ordinary people. At least please abide by law over there and blame the host country afterwards. There's no paradise today on this planet wherever you go

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@lucabrasi Thank you

@KenniG

I wouldn't type the phrases Japanese dream and American dream in the same sentence. First of all there isn't such a thing as a Japanese dream, never heard of. As for there not being an American dream, go and tell that to the likes of Clinton (Bill not Hilary), Obama, Harris, Biden, just to mention a few who came out of nowhere to rise to the highest offices in the land. Here when it rarely happens, see Suga, that PM is still very much a puppet moved by the upper echelon of the party.

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In the end, it all about the money.

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