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Kyoto Animation arsonist sent more than one novel to company as part of annual writing contest

12 Comments
By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

One month after the arson attack on Kyoto Animation’s Fushimi anime studio, Shinji Aoba, who was taken into police custody immediately following the attack, remains in the hospital. Aoba was heard shouting “I spread the gasoline and lit it with a lighter” as police subdued him, but his ongoing medical treatment for burns sustained in the incident have prevented his formal arrest, and mental health issues may limit the legal repercussions that can be brought against him.

However, investigators are already gathering evidence and building a case against the 41-year-old Aoba. While being taken into custody, Aoba also accusingly said “They stole my novel,” and after a subsequent search through the entries for Kyoto Animation’s annual Kyoto Animation Awards, a novel-writing contest open to both professional and amateur writers, Kyoto Animation said that it had indeed received a novel from Aoba.

Further investigation, though, has turned up not just a single novel from Aoba, but multiple entries to the Kyoto Animation Awards contest, according to a source connected to the investigation and quoted by Reuters. A number of the novels were stories about the school days of junior or senior high school students, raising the possibility that Aoba believed that elements in one of his submitted novels were copied by Kyoto Animation in one of the studio’s school-set anime series.

The arson attack claimed the lives of 35 Kyoto Animation employees, and also injured dozens. Nevertheless, both the company’s president and employees have vowed to continue the high-quality work that has come to define the studio, and has so suddenly become the posthumous legacy of their departed coworkers. Meanwhile, this year’s iteration of the Kyoto Animation Awards has been suspended indefinitely.

Source: Reuters Japan via Otakomu

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- Mental illness issues could make death penalty impossible for Kyoto Animation arsonist

-- Kyoto Animation president wants to turn site of arson attack into memorial park for victims

-- Kyoto Animation arson attack prompts call for stricter gas sale regulations in Kyoto

© SoraNews24

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

12 Comments
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Still making the murderer famous I see. It's been a month, people don't need to be reminded of his name.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Doesn't matter how many stories he sent.

Where's the proof his ideas were stolen?

If you can't show it to us, we don't need more articles regarding him.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Where's the proof his ideas were stolen?

I think you should wake up and realize that most articles are devoid of actual direct proof of a lot of things and the comments are full of speculation as a result. The fact that the studio claimed to have received a novel but actually got several is going to spark a lot of fresh speculation.

A simple question is: where the hell are those novels now and where have they been all this time? Its going to be real hard to find that proof you want so long as they are hidden and maybe that was exactly the point. Somebody at the studio may well share culpability for those deaths.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Somebody at the studio may well share culpability for those deaths.

Whaaa? Whether or not the studio used any of Aoba's material is immaterial. Nothing, absolutely nothing justifies the horrendous crime he committed. No one at the studio is culpable for this wanton disregard for human lives.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

i mean even if he's having mental issues, how could he write all those and how can he say that they stole his novel ?? or he's just mental issue is only about the part where he killed people but when it comes to accusing them of stealing he's mental issue disappeared

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Whether or not the studio used any of Aoba's material is immaterial.

Tell that to the guy whose material might have been stolen.

Nothing, absolutely nothing justifies the horrendous crime he committed.

Nothing, absolutely nothing I said suggested the crime was justified.

No one at the studio is culpable for this wanton disregard for human lives.

Tell that to the families of the dead if it is found someone at the studio stole the guy's work.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

No one at the studio is culpable for this wanton disregard for human lives.

Tell that to the families of the dead if it is found someone at the studio stole the guy's work.

If someone is found to have stolen his work, then that person could have been held responsible for a plagiarism lawsuit, not mass murder. No one is culpable for this crime except the psycho who lit the match.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If someone is found to have stolen his work, then that person could have been held responsible for a plagiarism lawsuit, not mass murder.

People seem to have broken out the magnifying glass and a scalpel to find fault with my comment. I did not say "culpable" as if only that person is responsible. I said "share culpability", as they were part of the equation.

Also I did not mean culpability in the legal sense. I meant it in the moral sense. Face it. If one crime led to the separate crime of you getting attacked or family killed, you would find some fault with the perp of the first crime and you know it. Most of you would never forgive either person.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I said "share culpability", as they were part of the equation.

I think the more correct term is that he may have been part of a very indirect causation chain. He would not have adequate causation considering the degree of separation, thus he is not culpable. And the fractions between plagiarism and mass murder is so adverse I would say that there's no moral culpability, at least if you are rational.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I think the more correct term is that he may have been part of a very indirect causation chain. He would not have adequate causation considering the degree of separation, thus he is not culpable. And the fractions between plagiarism and mass murder is so adverse I would say that there's no moral culpability, at least if you are rational.

THANK YOU!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why are all of you arguing over the justification of this murderer? As an artist myself, if someone stole my artwork, the last thought I would have is to set fire to the art studio itself killing innocent individuals. Even if they stole be his novels, that doesn't justify his doing :(

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It is important to understand what exactly triggered this chain of events. A lot would be explained if the directors did steal Aoba's works, and unknowingly young animators had to suffer because of someone's else vile act. Maybe, if this theory is proved, in the future higher-ups in different Japanese companies would think twice before unjustly stealing someone's ideas without properly crediting them. And no such tragedy would be possible.

I would be interested in what Educator60 thinks about this, whether Aoba is merely delusional or might have been actually wronged before coming up with arson?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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