crime

Lebanon neighbors welcome Ghosn; activists in uproar

18 Comments
By Anwar Amro and Layal Abou Rahal

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© 2019 AFP

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.


18 Comments
Login to comment

He will be perfectly safe in Lebanon----as long as he's got money.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

And one of the worst things is that he is a candidate for becoming the next president in Lebanon. He could win that position, because he has solid connections. I am so sorry for honest Lebanon people who must suffer another injustice in such a moment of crisis. :(

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

Might there not be a way to settle things amicably with Japan's Justice system now? They got the bail, avoided the media circus of a lengthy trial. If he agrees to stay in Lebanon, perhaps he could simply pay a fine and go on with his life?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Beirut is very far from perfect, but for Ghosn, it's a haven of peace and freedom compared to the oppression that Japan is capable of inflicting.

7 ( +14 / -7 )

Ghosn did what any rational adult that is facing the Japanese “justice” system would do if they had the means.

Can we count you as a 'rational' adult then...in any other language it's called a 'crook' fleeing, but hey English is flexible.

-5 ( +7 / -12 )

"Carlos Ghosn has suddenly befallen us, as if the country didn't already have enough thieves," Ali Mourad

This ^ sums it up for honest, hard working Lebanese with straight moral compass.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

"He then came to the comfort of the 'efficient' Lebanese justice system that never ever put a politician in jail for corruption even though billions of public funds are embezzled yearly," he said.

Musician Ziyad Sahhab wrote on Facebook that Ghosn had returned to "an environment incubating thieves".

Well, that sounds no different from Japan, now does it? All the recent scandals by high ranking Japanese executives, and not a single one sees any jail time or is even arrested.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

He'll fit right in there.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Tokyo officials have previously said the system is not inhumane and that Ghosn has been treated like any other suspect. In the other words he was badly treated as any other suspect. Medieval enforcement of admission of guilt, the physical torture replaced by psychological torture and mutilation. It is sad that otherwise such homogenous socially and culturally advanced society can be so backward when it comes to courts and justice. Problem is that in Japan everyday life is like ritual with no tolerance for deviation from rules, logical thinking is unnecessary because nothing ever changes, that is destroying the ability to think and make adaptive or innovative decisions.

In this case we are looking at the case where opposite of decent logic is applied.

In the west they say "do not bite the hand that feeds you." while here Japan said "bite off the hand that fed you" because you do not need it any more. They should have said; Thank You for the services well rendered, Keep the extra change and farewell on your next assignment. That would be a honourable discharge more inline with Japanese pride.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Labanese who are protesting for weeks now due to economic and political crisis are definitely not amused now.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Sh1mon M4sada

Can we count you as a 'rational' adult then...in any other language it's called a 'crook' fleeing, but hey English is flexible.

What happened to presumption of innocence?

3 ( +6 / -3 )

I am curious if whether Lebanon made him a diplomat he could travel freely, even to Japan, under diplomatic immunity. I have not been this surprised since Trump won the presidency. Totally unexpected.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"He then came to the comfort of the 'efficient' Lebanese justice system that never ever put a politician in jail for corruption even though billions of public funds are embezzled yearly," he said.

> Musician Ziyad Sahhab wrote on Facebook that Ghosn had returned to "an environment incubating thieves".

Well, that sounds no different from Japan, now does it? All the recent scandals by high ranking Japanese executives, and not a single one sees any jail time or is even arrested.

I wonder how long it will be before Japanese people realise they have a legal system on par with Lebanon

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The anti-Ghosn "activists" quoted in this article are a professor, a filmmaker, and a musician. That's says it all.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

RecklessToday  05:01 pm JST

I am curious if whether Lebanon made him a diplomat he could travel freely, even to Japan, under diplomatic immunity. 

Probably not. I would think that immunity would not apply to alleged crimes prior to becoming a diplomat.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Terrorist ties?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Back in the house he made Nissan-Renault buy and renovate for 16 millions ? ROFL

0 ( +0 / -0 )

...Ghosn returned to Lebanon...

...Trash returned to Gomibaco...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites