crime

Man arrested for attempting to kill common-law wife

13 Comments

Police in Tomakomai, Hokkaido, on Tuesday arrested a 27-year-old unemployed man on suspicion of attempting to kill his common-law wife, who is in her 30s, at their apartment.

According to police, Ren Okada has admitted to strangling the woman at around 7 p.m. Monday, Fuji TV reported. However, he stopped and the woman was able to call a friend who contacted police.

Police said the woman suffered bruises on her neck and face but her life is not in danger.

Meanwhile, local media reported Tuesday that the woman had consulted police in April about suffering domestic abuse at the hands of Okada.

The couple live together with two children, aged 8 and 3.

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13 Comments
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Interesting. I can not understand why people do this. Seems buying a one way ticket to Hawaii and living on Waikiki Beach enjoying the sights and drinking in the sunshine would be a better alternative than killing a person out of rage.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

It seems there are lots of unemployed men out there with issues. My solution: Look for, get, and, hold a damn job!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

the woman had consulted police in April about suffering domestic abuse at the hands of Okada. Here we go again - yet another victim reported being abused to police and what did they do for her? Assuming by all the other similar instances it seems whatever they did was not a deterrent. Laws need to be revised what actions they can take - how about having assailant report to police station a couple of times a day for a period of time together with regular evaluations by mental health professionals, maybe even subject them to the intense interrogations Japanese police are infamous for.

@Michael Machida - please don't send nut cases like this to Hawaii or any other foreign territory - we already have more than our share, thanks

8 ( +8 / -0 )

...tip of the iceberg...

9 ( +10 / -1 )

"the woman had consulted police in April about suffering domestic abuse "

no social workers coming around dispatched by the kops, to check on her well being, no welfare check if the male is removed from the household, no effiminization education for the kids, no pipeline to prison for the males? Their really missing out.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

"arrested a 27-year-old unemployed man on suspicion of attempting to kill his common-law wife

"However, he stopped"

"has admitted to strangling the woman"

as someone had said before: pop goes the weasel...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Meanwhile, local media reported Tuesday that the woman had consulted police in April about suffering domestic abuse at the hands of Okada.

The police knew about this abusive man already, but did nothing to protect the woman? I know she could just leave, but sometimes its just not that easy.

I hope he gets put away for sometime and she takes that time to disappear without him being able to find her! Because maybe next time, he won't stop!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

About the cops not doing anything for people consulting them about domestic abuse - a friend was asked by one of his friends to help her with her marriage. Her husband was verbally and psychologically abusive.

Does she have a place where she could stay - yes; does she want out of the marriage - yes; does she have enough savings to survive without her husband’s income for at least six months - yes.

He recommended a lawyer and that she pack up and leave immediately.

Jump forward two years and, yes, she’s still married, still being verbally and psychologically abused, and still wants to get out of the marriage. But ‘he needs me.’

Not to say the victim is to blame, but the police often have their hands tied by the law about what they can do. And, as in the case in Shizuoka, if the victim can’t or won’t identify the stalker, there’s really nothing they can do.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

My ex-husband a Japanese and a doctor when he was abusing me I would call the police and they told him he could not touch me because I was a foreigner this was 20 plus years ago. I guess not much has changed since than and will not.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Seems buying a one way ticket to Hawaii and living on Waikiki Beach enjoying the sights and drinking in the sunshine would be a better alternative than killing a person out of rage.

Most working people couldn't afford to do that, much less an unemployed man. He probably would have been homeless the minute he left her home.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There is no common-law in Japan.

It would be an informal marriage.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

There is no common-law in Japan.

There is. It's called 事実婚 (じじつこん jijitsukon). https://www.akanekai.co.jp/%E7%B5%90%E5%A9%9A/%E4%BA%8B%E5%AE%9F%E5%A9%9A%E3%81%A8%E3%81%AF%EF%BC%9F%E7%9F%A5%E3%81%A3%E3%81%A6%E3%81%8A%E3%81%84%E3%81%A6%E6%AC%B2%E3%81%97%E3%81%84%E6%B3%95%E5%BE%8B%E5%A9%9A%E3%81%A8%E3%81%AE%E9%81%95%E3%81%84/

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

There is. It's called 事実婚 (じじつこん jijitsukon).

There is no common-law, since Japan is a country with a civil-law system. In fact, Countries with common-law are mostly just English speaking countries.

Common-law marriage implies that it is a marriage as stipulated by common-law, but as I said, there is no common law in Japan.

Jijitsukon, as the name says would be a "de-facto marriage", in fact in japan is also called an undocumented marriage. For the most part, "De-facto marriage" is not at all recognized as a marriage in Japan strictly speaking, but in reality there are many ways in which it can get some sort of legal recognition, specially by family courts, and many businesses.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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