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Man arrested for beating elementary school daughter

46 Comments

Police in Sakata, Yamagata Prefecture, have arrested a 41-year-old man on suspicion of beating his elementary school daughter.

Police said the suspect, who is a chef, is accused of beating his second oldest daughter, who is under the age of 10, at their home between around 7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. on April 18, including slapping her in the face multiple times, Sankei Shimbun reported.

The man took his daughter to be treated at a hospital which contacted police on Friday about a case of possible child abuse.

Police said the man has admitted to beating his daughter but did not give a reason.

The child suffered injuries to her face which will take about two weeks to heal, police quoted doctors as saying.

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46 Comments
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An inadequate monster.

9 ( +13 / -4 )

Too many people still consider physical punishment their default way to discipline their children, and when confronted with the huge amount of evidence that proves it is not justified, nor the most effective way to educate the children, their excuse is to say "I was beaten up when I was I child and I turned up fine".

It should be obvious that by trying to defend the physical abuse of children they are showing that they did not turned up fine at all.

5 ( +15 / -10 )

This guy should have the same thing done to him by someone much bigger and stronger than he is. Maybe 3 or 4 times later he might begin to understand how his child felt. Some people here will probably see it as harsh but good parenting. (I recall such phrases as "weaking sissy" and "man up and go" (to school) and other such rot. I hit my kid exactly no times at all. She turned out great. Love trumps bullying every time. So this guy should get the beating he gave, over and over till he gets it through his head.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

Too many people still consider physical punishment their default way to discipline their children,

Too many people still confuse physical punishment with physical abuse.

There is no indication in the article that the man in this article believed he was punishing his daughter.

2 ( +12 / -10 )

"man up and go" (to school) and other such rot

Not 'rot'. One of life's many hard lessons. But, hey, let's pamper kids and let them stay home if they don't want to go. That's working so well in Japan.

I hit my kid exactly no times at all.

Yeah, anecdotal evidence isn't proof. I knew kids when I was growing up who could have done with a firm hand. I presume most of them have crossed path with the law at some stage.

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

It's important to recognise that while violence in the streets of Japan is low, violence in the home is high.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Too many people still confuse physical punishment with physical abuse.

Slapping a child is physical abuse, no other way to see it,

There is no indication in the article that the man in this article believed he was punishing his daughter.

Instead of what? providing her pleasure? what other purpose would you think slapping her would have? there is no rational way anybody could believe this is not just an adult physically punishing a child.

Not 'rot'. One of life's many hard lessons. But, hey, let's pamper kids and let them stay home if they don't want to go. That's working so well in Japan.

False dichotomy, it is not a choice just between beating up a child and letting them do as they please, there are many ways to discipline a child without ever having to use physical violence, and many of those other ways work much better. The problem is that adults don't get the satisfaction of beating someone up to release their anger, so these people like to pretend those many other ways do not exist so they can justify keeping the abuse.

Yeah, anecdotal evidence isn't proof.

The scientific consensus from the experts in child rearing is not based on "anecdotal evidence", so when the experts clearly say there is no need for physical violence and that other forms of discipline are much better the ones trying to refute this with invalid anecdotes are the abusers.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

too many people still consider physical punishment their default way to discipline their children

it's been illegal in japan for some time now...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I wonder how many kanji sheets or how much room cleaning or conversation with a more respectful tone the child managed after the man finished punching her in the face. Its not easy to do those things in hospital.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I will not judge this man because he did the right thing to bring her to hospital and they are not saying anything else than just 2 week injuries (which is hardly that bad) and not general physical abuse.

Doesn't make it look like he is a monster being objective and he shall have learned his lesson. Now neighbours and school will watch out I hope and everything will be fine. Ask about his wife too in particular if everything is fine.

If he carries on, that is another problem.

Please don't destroy his family by revealing his name in such case. This is a story that does not need national coverage at all.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

it's been illegal in japan for some time now...

Which unfortunately is not enough to stop these adults that "turned up completely fine".

I will not judge this man because he did the right thing to bring her to hospital and they are not saying anything else than just 2 week injuries (which is hardly that bad) and not general physical abuse

This makes no sense, if an adult came and beat up a minor under your care and produced injuries that would take 2 weeks to heal, would you not judge him either? would it make it ok if he brought the child to the hospital (while opportunely hiding he was the one causing the injuries until the police was involved)? Most people would not, specially because nothing indicates this was even the first time it happened, just the first time he was arrested for it.

Doesn't make it look like he is a monster being objective and he shall have learned his lesson

How many years ago do you think have passed to blindly assume he changed? Some abusers may change (specially when the police is finally involved) but many don't and this sometimes ends up in big tragedies. Blindly assuming all will be nice and fine or that it was the first time for this to happen is not a rational response. The government have a responsibility to fully investigate the case and protect the child from someone that had such an urge to satisfy his rage than he choose to break the law.

Protecting a child from an abuser is not what destroy a family, that would be the responsibility of the abuser, if professionals that deal with these cases end up thinking the child should be under other adults responsibility that would mean this would be what is best for the child.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

It is important to note that corporal punishment against children has been made illegal in Japan. In this case, as the father has engaged in such behavior, he must be prosecuted by the law.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

There's not enough information in the article for me to judge. Each child is different. How do you deal with an enraged child pointing a kitchen knife at her mother for example?

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

I never beat any of my three children who are now mature adults. They don't beat their children. The cycle of violence needs to be ended.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

Any kind of abuse against children is unacceptable.

Children are children and you have to hug them even if you think they have had made a mistake.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Slapping a child is physical abuse, no other way to see it,

You are the one who suggested that it was discipline when you said: "Too many people still consider physical punishment their default way to discipline their children"

I'm suggesting that you are confusing physical punishment with physical abuse.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Me:

There is no indication in the article that the man in this article believed he was punishing his daughter.

You:

Instead of what? providing her pleasure? what other purpose would you think slapping her would have? there is no rational way anybody could believe this is not just an adult physically punishing a child.

I'm saying there was no indication that he believed he was punishing her. Maybe he is just a sick masochist?

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

wallaceToday  11:00 am JST

I never beat any of my three children who are now mature adults. They don't beat their children. The cycle of violence needs to be ended.

This is true for the most part.

Anger and violence is not something some people have a lot of control over, not because it's their choice or they are 'bad' people, but for several reasons including a history of abuse, lack of parenting skills, stress and mental health issues, interpersonal conflict, social and cultural norms, the cycle of violence and a lack of support systems.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How do you deal with an enraged child pointing a kitchen knife at her mother for example?

Not having enough information does not justify making up a situation that is not likely to have happened at all, there is nothing in the note that would indicate this kind of violent development being the case, no previous involvement of social services or the police. So the (unfortunately) usual situation is simply much more likely to have happened.

You are the one who suggested that it was discipline when you said: "Too many people still consider physical punishment their default way to discipline their children"

Because it is the most common reason why adults abuse children, you on the other hand made the irrelevant claim this could be physical punishment without it being abuse, that is what makes absolutely no sense.

I'm suggesting that you are confusing physical punishment with physical abuse.

To physically punish a child (with slaps) is always physical abuse, you have not argued how slapping a child as in this situation could not represent abuse.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

> wallaceToday  10:54 am JST

It is important to note that corporal punishment against children has been made illegal in Japan. In this case, as the father has engaged in such behavior, he must be prosecuted by the law.

Yes, true in schools but spanking has not been banned.

[Not picking on you Wallace but you often post comments that I relate to and often agree with :) ]

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Any form of physical punishment against children is illegal.

Parents can control their anger or seek anger management therapy.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Physical abuse and punishment against any child is assault and should be punishable by prison time. This man is coward because his victim wa so young and small and could not fight back, he would not dared to have done this to a well built man in his 20's.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Corporal punishment is unlawful in all settings, including the home.

https://www.endcorporalpunishment.org/wp-content/uploads/country-reports/Japan.pdf

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Times have much changed and such is becoming even big news. Still in my generation it was a common and not questioned punishment at home for most of us. The majority of parents would have been prosecuted or landed in jail when there would've been the standards of today. Almost no one left who would have run the economy and nearly all children being alone and unattended while the beating parents would have been under investigation or in prison. lol

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

I'm saying there was no indication that he believed he was punishing her. Maybe he is just a sick masochist?

That makes absolutely no sense,

First because there is no realistic way anybody could think the beating is not punishment, the daughter obviously was in pain, enough to merit a visit to the hospital, that is enough to constitute punishment and abuse.

Second because being a sick masochist would make a person to ask for pain to be inflicted on them, not do it unto others which would be a sadist (which would still mean the intention is to punish the girl, so it would still be both physical punishment and physical abuse).

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

owzer

I'm suggesting that you are confusing physical punishment with physical abuse.

And, almost everyone else is pointing out that there is no confusion, as they are one and the same.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Absolute cowardly scum of the earth. I hope he loses all custodial rights to these children. He should be re-arrested if he comes within 100 metres of them.

I just hope the poor girl recovers physically and mentally.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

There's a difference between a light slap on the hand or backside to prevent dangerous behaviour and several slaps in the face...for ANY reason.

A HUGE difference

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Still in my generation it was a common and not questioned punishment at home for most of us

Thus progress has been achieved.

Almost no one left who would have run the economy and nearly all children being alone and unattended while the beating parents would have been under investigation or in prison.

So you think parents would have persisted without change even when the action was recognized as abuse, unnecessary and against the law as it is now? That is not a realistic expectation.

lol*

Most people do not find child abuse entertaining.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

wallaceToday  12:38 pm JST

Corporal punishment is unlawful in all settings, including the home.

https://www.endcorporalpunishment.org/wp-content/uploads/country-reports/Japan.pdf

Thanks, Wallace. This new law change is great news for all children in Japan!

How did I miss that in the news last year?

Japan has joined 65 other nations that have banned spanking.

Let's hope it's not just words on a piece of paper and the police actually arrest and prosecute some parents.

I was physically abused as a child, and I continue to be angry with my son, but I don't hit him (maybe once or twice, sadly).

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Mandatory anger management and parenting classes before seeing her again.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

You know what to do

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

METATTOKYO

Creating laws is one thing, but enforcing them is a much more challenging task.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Hopefully this stops things completely and they are not permitted to get any worse.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Jonathan PrinToday  10:14 am JST

I will not judge this man because he did the right thing to bring her to hospital and they are not saying anything else than just 2 week injuries (which is hardly that bad) and not general physical abuse.

Doesn't make it look like he is a monster being objective and he shall have learned his lesson. Now neighbours and school will watch out I hope and everything will be fine. Ask about his wife too in particular if everything is fine.

If he carries on, that is another problem.

Please don't destroy his family by revealing his name in such case. This is a story that does not need national coverage at all.

Man slaps a girl under 10yrs old so hard in the face that injuries need 2 weeks to heal. Do you have any idea how hard you need to slap to cause that much injury and healing time. If this doesn't, what exactly constitutes general physical abuse to you? I really hope you don't have kids.

Oh but since he brought her to the hospital we need to cut him some slack.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

wallaceToday  01:54 pm JST

METATTOKYO

Creating laws is one thing, but enforcing them is a much more challenging task.

Yes, that's why I said; "Let's hope it's not just words on a piece of paper and the police actually arrest and prosecute some parents.'

1 ( +2 / -1 )

man arrested for beating elementary school daughter

it's been illegal in japan for some time now...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

My only question is WHY? The father did not say what the child did. Everyone was a child once, or perhaps never grow up and yes children make mistakes as well as many adults but some mistakes must not go unpunished the amount of abuse could have perhaps mounted to a busted lip, we don't know, the doctor said the injury would take about two weeks to heal. Because it was a child and we all have them but we don't know what his child did and everyone raise their children as they see fit. Some don't punish and some does, do what works for you. I got spanking and as I look back at what I did they were justified say what you want to say I am just fine!

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

do what works for you...

illegal: "not allowed by law"

4 ( +4 / -0 )

My only question is WHY?

That would be blaming the victim, there is no realistic scenario that would justify beating up a child since non-violent ways to enforce discipline are available. Mistakes do not need to go "unpunished" just because it is not allowed to hit a child, plenty of effective and easy punishments can be done without ever resulting to violence.

we don't know what his child did

And it does not matter at all, the adult broke the law and the child is a victim, trying to shift blame toward the victim is morally reprehensible.

and everyone raise their children as they see fit. 

Invalid argument, using physical violence is wrong and illegal even if the parent thinks is justified.

I got spanking and as I look back at what I did they were justified say what you want to say I am just fine!

As said previously, seeing how you justify physical abuse of a child and even tried to blame the victim that clearly shows you did not turned up as fine as you think you did.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@virusrexApr. 22 09:56 am JST

Slapping a child is physical abuse, no other way to see it,

Actually, that's not true. Punishment can be defined as the intentional infliction of harm within socially acceptable limits by an accepted authority figure (often even by the victim himself, at least partially) justified with at least a sincere belief it would contribute to the positive aim of improving the victim's behavior.

Without condoning corporal punishment, we can still acknowledge that there is a difference between a beating that has that justificatory element, and a beating without that element, and owzer clearly classes this case with the latter.

Regarding the social acceptability of corporal punishment (separate from the legal acceptability), in a country where only maybe 20% of people are willing to unconditionally rule out corporal punishment:

An online survey of 20,000 adults carried out in January 2021 found that 41.3 percent of respondents approved of using corporal punishment for disciplinary purposes. 0.9 percent said it should be used proactively, 7.8 percent said it should be used if necessary, and 32.6 percent said it should be used only as a last resort.

sadly we have to accept it is still "socially acceptable".

The scientific view, of course, is not unknown. The problem is that the scientific view is on averages and probabilities.

Beating kids increases the chances of problems down the road, true, but not everyone will have problems. And it is undeniable corporal punishment does sometimes solve problems.

This creates an incentive for parents to rationalize while the odds are, as a whole not favorable, they can maneuver themselves and their kid into the clean part of the probability cones, that in their local case beating is the best solution even if overall it may not be.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Actually, that's not true. Punishment can be defined as the intentional infliction of harm within socially acceptable limits by an accepted authority figure (often even by the victim himself, at least partially) justified with at least a sincere belief it would contribute to the positive aim of improving the victim's behavior.

There is no way beating up a kid so it would require 2 weeks of recovery is included in the socially acceptable limits, that is stretching the definition too much to the point of invalidity. As long as it can be described as a beating there is no way it can be justified, there is a reason why it is illegal.

sadly we have to accept it is still "socially acceptable".

No, definitely it is not. There is a huge difference between a single slap that would produce discomfort and a beating both would be corporal punishment, but not both would be considered a beating. Trying to make both equivalent is condoning it with invalid excuses.

The scientific view, of course, is not unknown. The problem is that the scientific view is on averages and probabilities.

This makes absolutely no sense, when the scientific consensus is clear that means the conclusions are well known, that averages and probabilities do absolutely nothing to refute this, most of what is applicable to human health and formation deals with averages and probabilities, from smoking in public places to the type of diet is followed, that does not mean we suddenly don't know if smoking causes cancer.

Your justification that "some children" would not have problem is as valid as someone justifying smoking constantly in your face saying that "some people" would not have cancer even with constant exposure to secondary smoke, worthless.

*This creates an incentive for parents to rationalize while the odds are, as a whole not favorable, they can maneuver themselves and their kid into the clean part of the probability cones, that in their local case beating is the best solution even if overall it may not be.*

Which in no way justifies their actions, it just explain why they mistakenly took that choice even when illegal.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

There is no way beating up a kid so it would require 2 weeks of recovery

I agree, and I believe Owzer does as well. That's another reason he's distinguishing between this and what he considers "acceptable" corporal punishment. On the other hand, that you are saying "can be described as a beating" suggests that there are some applications of violence you would consider either less serious or even potentially justified.

Your justification that "some children" would not have problem is as valid as someone justifying smoking constantly in your face saying that "some people" would not have cancer even with constant exposure to secondary smoke, worthless.

Isn't that exactly what our remaining smokers believe? That the odds are against them is undeniable unless they give no credit to science at all, but I don't think many of them would be smoking if they believe they would be the one hit. So we can surmise they believe they would not be personally hit with cancer due to smoking.

Another example is torture. The scientific view on that is well known. But even if they can say, for example, that 95% of torture confessions are unreliable, they can't say 100%. There's a 5% chance the truth might come out, and when you've got no leads and a 5% lead is better than a completely random search (for say an IED) over a large area ... well ... that's why we hadn't gotten rid of torture.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

I agree, and I believe Owzer does as well. That's another reason he's distinguishing between this and what he considers "acceptable" corporal punishment.

No he is not, he is talking about this article where a child was beaten up to the point of the lesions requiring weeks to heal, he says this can be punishment without being abuse, which has no merit.

suggests that there are some applications of violence you would consider either less serious or even potentially justified

Pulling out a kid by the arm to save him from running into the front of a speeding car can be described as physical violence, but obviously not a beating and not abuse. Once again pretending all use of physical force is equivalent is where you abandon reason to justify something that has no justification.

Isn't that exactly what our remaining smokers believe? 

No, it is not, which is why smokers are not allowed to keep their habits anywhere. The law makes it very clear that the consequences of second hand smoke (even if based on "averages and probabilities") are enough to scientifically know it causes damage and make regulations and laws that forbid people to behave in certain ways. We as society can definitely know that things like smoking or using physical violence to educate are negative and best avoided, your argument of "averages and probabilities" is still nonsensical.

But even if they can say, for example, that 95% of torture confessions are unreliable, they can't say 100%.

But that is enough to prove the conduct is unreliable and since it is morally unacceptable that facilitates concluding this is something that have to be avoided and punished when it happens.

that's why we hadn't gotten rid of torture

The much easier explanation is that some people enjoy torture and will try to justify that enjoyment by grasping at straws, for example by arguing that nothing in medicine is known because it is all based on probabilities.

I mean, when you justify beating up a kid (a conduct that is illegal) using as an argument the existence of torture you are not helping your position, instead you are making it much more clear why it is not valid. Looking it from the other way is like someone saying "torture can be justified, after all we still beat up kids to educate them"

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

virusrexApr. 22 08:06 am JST

Too many people still consider physical punishment their default way to discipline their children,

Of course, if a father is beating up his small daughter that her injuries need 2 weeks to heal, that is clearly not punishment but a crime. A slap on her behind in case of bad behavior will not take 2 weeks to heal..

I wonder what is your advice what to do with children who are beating up other smaller or weaker children.

Bullying in school is also a subject, which should be discussed. What kind of punishment do you suggest in such cases?

I am not against any form of physical punishment. Not every physical punishment is abuse.

I am strongly against do-gooders, who try to protect children against any form of punishment and find an excuse for everything regardless what a child is doing.

I am happy to live here in Japan where children are still respectful and not in Europe in my native country anymore, where parents have no rights at all and their children up to 14 years old are allowed to do whatever they like without any consequences - vandalism, joining gangs, selling drugs, stealing from shops, robbing passers-by, attacking teachers and their parents with a knife, even kill another class-mate and the law considers them as under age of criminal responsibility. - no punishment at all.

What is your advice, what to do with such feral 'children' who do not understand the difference between right and wrong?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Of course, if a father is beating up his small daughter that her injuries need 2 weeks to heal

By law is illegal to use physical violence to discipline a child, the law do not make any distinction to excuse the parents to even your examples are still illegal.

I wonder what is your advice what to do with children who are beating up other smaller or weaker children.

The same advice as having a children with a burning fever, or that have developmental problems, etc. It should be obvious and simple for anybody, "consult with an specialist", there is no mystery on that.

I am strongly against do-gooders, who try to protect children against any form of punishment and find an excuse for everything regardless what a child is doing.

that would still be irrelevant, you are advocating for illegal conduct, that has been demonstrated to be counterproductive and much worse than other options that the experts actually recommend to educate children, you are not justifying your position, just explaining you are mistaken.

The problem is not that children are not abused with the excuse of discipline, the problem are adults that choose to act illegally because of simple convenience and sadism.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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