crime

Man arrested for trying to con 91-year-old man out of Y15 mil

24 Comments

Police in Machida, Tokyo, said Monday they have arrested a 21-year-old man for trying to con a 91-year-old man out of 15 million yen by posing as his son on the phone.

According to police, a man contacted the elderly man who lives in Higashi-Murayama on Oct 4, and pretended to be his son. TBS reported that the caller allegedly told the man that a bag containing a very important contract had been stolen and that he needed 15 million yen to cover the loss or else he would be in big trouble.

The elderly man went to a credit union and asked to withdraw the money but a bank employee was suspicious and notified police on his behalf. TBS said the police spent about one hour trying to talk the man out of withdrawing the money because it might be a scam, but the man insisted he must help his son.

However, he went home with police officers and about two hours later, a man identified as Kuniaki Masuda showed up and said he was a colleague of the man's son. Police arrested Masuda who has denied trying to scam the man. He was quoted by police as saying he had only come to pick up a bag, TBS reported.

Police said they suspect Masuda may have been involved in similar scams before.

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24 Comments
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and the old man still thinks he let his son down...he does not believe the police nor bank neither.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Well, I certainly hope the son turns up safe. He might be tied to a chair right now with an angry yakuza boss irrate because Masuda has not showed up with the bag yet.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Kudos to the bank employee, and shame of the 21 year old AND the 91 year old for falling for this obviously stupid scheme. Your 91 fricken years old and you don't know that that you DON'T have a 21 year old son, or a son that's that young?!??!?!?! Shameful

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Shouldn't they try to contact the old man's real son? The old guy's probably confused and still concerned about his son.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I find a couple things very disturbing about this story. 1) The gall this kid has to rip-off this old man of his life savings, and 2) This old man clearly loves his son a lot, but he doesn't feel the need to call him and ask him if he's in trouble? Good thing the bank employee was suspicious and acted upon his hunch. The world needs more people to step-up when they see something wrong.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Shouldn't they try to contact the old man's real son?

I wouldn't be too shocked or stunned if he didn't even have a son. These people really should be looked after more carefully.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This guy who was arrested plays the role of receiving the cash. He 's just a tail of a lizard. You have to catch the guys on top of the pyramid.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Control freak:

" Well, I certainly hope the son turns up safe. He might be tied to a chair right now with an angry yakuza boss irrate because Masuda has not showed up with the bag yet. "

I´d say the existance of the Easter Bunny has a higher probability rate.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

91-year-old man's mind is not as sharp as you think..please give some leeway

9 ( +10 / -1 )

a man identified as Kuniaki Masuda showed up and said he was a colleague of the man’s son.

So it's not that the thought he was his son.

Let's see how hale and hearty y'all are at 91.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

It would seem that getting away with this kind of scam in Japan is like shooting fish in a barrel. My MIL nearly fell for a scam like this and she sees her son every day of the week. Well done that bank employee for questioning the withdrawal.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Nicely done by the bank and police!! Finally a team-effort system that saved the day for this defenseless 91 y.o. citizen. And I can't help wonder how this 91 y.o. pulled off a 21 y.o. son...at the age of 71 !?!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

cmon people, as you get older you start losing your marbles as well as memory, etc. give him a break. I am waiting for those scammer's to call me and pretend they have fooled me and only to have the police waiting for them.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The penalties for defrauding the elderly are much too lenient, which is why crimes of this nature are booming. If proved guilty, Mr. Masuda should do hard time. As a rule of thumb, I would suggest 1 year of incarceration for every 1 million yen he attempted to steal.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It seems to me that some of the people criticizing the victim themselves have the kind of impairment of faculties one might associate with old age. It doesn't say anywhere in the article that the son is 21, and he probably isn't. Nor does it say that the scammer was pretending to be the son when he showed up at the house. In fact it specifically says that he didn't do that. Makes you wonder how some people will manage when they hit their 90s.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Why didn't the flops just contact his son to confirm it for the old fella? Glad the bank staff were onto it. This scam has been going on for years, possibly even decades, despite the awareness campaign. Obviously, the awareness campaign is not working!

Moderator: There is no need to refer to the police as "flops." Please repost.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

You should never blame the victims in these cases.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The police should have told Masuda that they would escort him and the money to the old man's son.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

You should never blame the victims in these cases.

Normally I would agree, but this scam is so old. There have been literally hundreds of PSAs, posters, news articles, pamphlets, etc that have warned seniors against scammers like this. It so easy to check (call your kids, ask for their name, ask for the names of the grandkids etc) yet these people just blindly fall for it. The reason why these scammers still exist is because ITS SO FRICKEN EASY!!

Sorry, but for this particular scam, the victims are to blame for being so naive and not paying attention to what is going on.

Lastly, anyone who isn't in of sound mind should not have 100% access to that kind of money. There should be a safeguard in place where a designated guarantor has be accompany account holders over the age of 75 if withdrawing a given amount of cash.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"Sorry, but for this particular scam, the victims are to blame for being so naive and not paying attention to what is going on"

There was a very credible article that makes the point of the human mind not being able to deal with scammers when it reaches 75 (anywhere in the world). It's based on medical science. You can't blame the victims because they are not the ones the police are after. And in this case the 91-year-old is not under arrest. The 21-year-old is and he is 100% to blame.

"The penalties for defrauding the elderly are much too lenient, which is why crimes of this nature are booming."

In the US (at least my state) scamming the elderly is a crime with an extra penalty and it's for the very good reason where scamming an elderly person is sometimes as easy as scamming a child. It is very uncool. Maybe they will do the same here soon. Hope so!!

"Lastly, anyone who isn't in of sound mind should not have 100% access to that kind of money."

Can you be more specific on how this policy/law/rule should be implemented? Does this exist anywhere in the world now? Where should the money go?

"I am waiting for those scammer's to call me and pretend they have fooled me and only to have the police waiting for them."

I like this idea. If enough people (who are able minded) do this it will help reduce the problem as there will be more arrests and will send a serious message not to mess with seniors.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

There was a very credible article that makes the point of the human mind not being able to deal with scammers when it reaches 75

You don't have to "deal with" scammer, but rather have the common sense to realize that #1. 15Mil yen is a lot of fricken money and #2. You don't give it to a complete stranger claiming to represent a family member. My 86 year old grandmother was scammed and she saw right through it. When one of her 7 grandchildren calls, she ALWAYS asks what our name is whether she thinks she recognizes our voices or not. ITS COMMON SENSE!!!

And in this case the 91-year-old is not under arrest.

Not saying that he is guilty of anything other than a serious lack of common sense, especially in this day and age when crimes like this is uber common.

Can you be more specific on how this policy/law/rule should be implemented? Does this exist anywhere in the world now? Where should the money go?

It does exist but not for senior, more for young adults who come into a lot of money through an inheritance or other means. The parents would leave a clause in the will that states that the child has access to the part of the fund until he/she reaches a certain age.

The same should be applied to seniors to protect them from frivolous spending or being a victim of senseless crime like this. The banks should implement a service or policy where the senior needs to be accompanied by a designated guardian, so that if there is a sign off by the guardian, everyone can be sure that the money is being used for a legit cause, and being given away to stranger who just asks for it.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

that was smart of the banker.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The article I read was based on the science of neurology. I will stand by the scientific source that states the 75-year-old brain is in a condition that makes the elderly more prone to scams. You need to argue with the scientists and not me. This is why there are "crimes against the elderly" with higher penalties in other countries (at least mine). I'm younger than 86, but I know I can see a scam without doing a "voice test" and what you are saying implies your grandmother needs to test people who call her rather than rely on common sense to make sure she is not getting scammed (younger people would need not do such a test)

"The parents would leave a clause in the will that states that the child has access to the part of the fund until he/she reaches a certain age" 91 years old?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"that was smart of the banker"

Kudos to the bank employee, who tipped off the cops"

"However, he went home with police officers and about two hours later, a man identified as Kuniaki Masuda showed up and said he was a colleague of the man’s son. Police arrested Masuda who has denied trying to scam the man. He was quoted by police as saying he had only come to pick up a bag"

Oh good grief, how insolent can you get? The old man should have been allowed to slap Masuda upside the head a few dozen times after that insolent remark! And Masuda and any cohorts had better be not allowed to roam the streets for awhile, say, 10 years, and he should be sentenced to hard labor.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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