crime

Man convicted of severing ballet teacher's thumb appeals jail sentence

30 Comments

A 42-year-old man who was convicted last month by the Tokyo District Court of attempted murder for severing the thumb of his former ballet instructor has appealed his jail sentence.

Hiroaki Hashimoto was convicted of trying to kill his ballet instructor, a woman in her 20s, at a dance studio in Tokyo's Shibuya district on July 6 last year. He choked the victim and when she lost consciousness, used a hammer to sever her right thumb, Fuji TV reported.

He was sentenced to four years and six months.

During his trial, Hashimoto said he could not suppress his rage because he felt his instructor was treating him rudely in front of other students in the class.

In filing the appeal, Hashimoto's lawyer said his client lost his temper but did not mean to kill the woman and that he knows he will have to live with what he did for the rest of his life.

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30 Comments
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She didn't see this coming? You gotta know there's something wrong with a 42 year old guy who wants to take ballet lessons

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

he knows he will have to live with what he did for the rest of his life.

Oh the poor baby. That's so much worse than living the rest of your life after a maniac strangles you and smashing your thumb off with a hammer. Four years. He should be grateful for such a light sentence. He'll soon be free to attack women and smash then with hammers, and still be young enough to do so,

I certainly hope that by filing an appeal, he opens himself to getting his sentence increased. That would be sweet.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

She didn't see this coming? You gotta know there's something wrong with a 42 year old guy who wants to take ballet lessons

Why?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

She didn't see this coming? You gotta know there's something wrong with a 42 year old guy who wants to take ballet lessons

That is really poor logic. If you have a school, or a business that requires interaction with customers, you know that the endusers motivation is secondary. Blaming the instructor for teaching a now known disturbed individual is pretty much the same as oh....blaming a special needs 8 year old for not ducking out of the way bullets fast enough. In both instances, the victims should know better, right? As far as the criminal in this case, I do wish there was a circumstance where upon appeal more time or conditions where added. Mentally moving from chocking to getting a hammer and severing a thumb takes a lot thought.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

She didn't see this coming? You gotta know there's something wrong with a 42 year old guy who wants to take ballet lessons

The longer a thread on JT about a story with a victim goes, the probability of someone blaming the victim approaches 1.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I am not blaming the victim, but as an instructor, you should be quite curious and cautious with a single 42 year man in Japan wanting to take a ballet class. Knowing that my demographic is mostly women and children. That would be the first question that I ask. Not only for my own safety but for the safety of my students. After that, all unusual or possible perceived issues should be paid attention to.

Safety is two-way street. People shouldn't do bad things, and people should be on the lookout for other people doing bad things. The first line of defense is always situational awareness. For any instructor, that is part of the job.

How many people here would trust their children in the care of someone who didn't have good situational awareness?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

4 years for attempted murder and mutilation seems very unjust. She should at least be able to file severe civil charges for a massive payout to help her with her somewhat ruined life and emotional damage. I assume she will never really trust a stranger ever again

2 ( +2 / -0 )

A 42-year-old man who was convicted last month by the Tokyo District Court of attempted murder for severing the thumb of his former ballet instructor

Yeah, I want to appeal his sentence too! Four and a half years is nowhere near long enough for attempted murder and grievous bodily harm! He should be doing at least ten years without parole! He choked the women with the intent to kill her and then cut of her thumb with hammer! He is a flipping psycho!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

obviously he was being treated rudely for a reason. if he doesn't go to jail something is really wrong in the world.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Silvafan... victim blaming? We don't know what the make-up of her class was - it may not have even been a ballet class. There's no reason to imagine all she would teach is ballet.

Never blame the victim for what some loony with a hammer will do.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Perhaps it was wrong in the first place to charge him with attempted murder. In his tiny mind, after all the dust has settled, he will be feeling some remorse, possibly, but also somehow wronged, in that the system is not understanding him perfectly. Maybe he really did not want to kill her. What options are open to the law if they grant him a retrial now?

Even so, why did he take her thumb of all things? Sounds weird. His motivation has not been explained, to my knowledge, not in the press anyway.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

we still dont know about the exact nature of the realtionship with the dance teacher.

Speak for yourself. There was already a trial - you may not know, but the people who were at the trial do.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I wish the court of appeal would see sense and lengthen his sentence!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Thunderbird

We don't know what the make-up of her class was - it may not have even been a ballet class.

Quote: A 42-year-old man who was convicted last month by the Tokyo District Court of attempted murder for severing the thumb of his former ballet instructor has appealed his jail sentence.

We do know!

Never blame the victim for what some loony with a hammer will do.

You are putting words in my mouth. No one said it was her fault. Showing the victim's possible role in an altercation may be contrary to typical explanations of violence and cruelty, but it isn't always fallacious. Expecting a teacher to be aware of their environment more so than the average person is not victim blaming. It is part of the job. Being more aware of the situation could have yielded a possible different outcome for the instructor.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I am not blaming the victim, but as an instructor, you should be quite curious and cautious with a single 42 year man in Japan wanting to take a ballet class. Knowing that my demographic is mostly women and children. That would be the first question that I ask. Not only for my own safety but for the safety of my students. After that, all unusual or possible perceived issues should be paid attention to.

Should she have then turned him away because of his gender and age? What's the word for that? Ah, yes... discrimination.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Should she have then turned him away because of his gender and age?

And that's even assuming she could do so if she wanted to. I don't know how ballet works, but I'm pretty sure that the English teachers I've known couldn't turn down a student they didn't like, it was up to the school they worked at who was in the lessons.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Extend the sentence, too short I'd say. If he has issues controlling his temper and rage, then what's stopping him from doing it in the future?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@Mr. Noidall

Should she have then turned him away because of his gender and age? What's the word for that? Ah, yes... discrimination.

No, she could be more watchful of him if something doesn't seem right. She could also notice how he interacts with other students, how he responds to criticism, or how he behaves in class. All the things that other teachers in other fields are suppose to do. I believe that maybe she wasn't doing it enough.

For example, if see someone walking down the street coming towards you, and something about them gives you dangerous vibe including behavior, stare, or carrying something dangerous. Are you going to continue to walk towards them? Or walk on the other side of the street? Or at least keep a close eye on them until they pass? Or report them to someone like the police?

My guess is that most people would one of those things. If people are simply ignoring these situations that quite often happens in Japan then that is problem.

And that's even assuming she could do so if she wanted to. I don't know how ballet works, but I'm pretty sure that the English teachers I've known couldn't turn down a student they didn't like, it was up to the school they worked at who was in the lessons.

I have also witnessed how teaching is done in many types of Japanese teacher lead classes. Nine time out of ten, they are teacher-centered instead of student-centered which means most of the time Japanese teachers aren't really noticing or igoring what the students are doing in the class like sleeping or texting.

In most educational environments, they can notify staff, and they make a adjustments in the class to avoid issues. Everyone involved in the situation has a responsibility. That is why legally a victim can sometimes be determined to be the cause of the bad situation. I am not saying she was the cause or he is innocent.

I just think that she ignored the obvious signs that were probably present that something is wrong, and unfortunately, she learned a hard lesson that no one should have to experience.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I just think that she ignored the obvious signs that were probably present that something is wrong

I think you're probably right, based on the absolutely nothing whatsoever to support that hypothesis.

Well you know, other than the fact that the victim is always at fault, right?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Strangerland

I think you're probably right, based on the absolutely nothing whatsoever to support that hypothesis.

There are always signs. Whether a person notices them or not is a different story.

Well you know, other than the fact that the victim is always at fault, right?

Who is saying it always the victim's fault? You obviously don't understand a strawman argument because you keep committing the same major fallacy like a few others on this thread.

Once again, everyone has certain amount of responsibility in any situation. You must never studied any kind of law because if you did then you would know what I am talking about. Some have more responsibility than others. I described what her responsibilities were.

Here is a quote from Japantimes:

Hiroaki Hashimoto, a 41-year-old chiropractor, admitted to injuring the 24-year-old instructor. “She harassed me by not informing me of lesson schedules since last August,” the police quoted him as saying.

Here is some more info:

Hashimoto began taking lessons at the ballet school near JR Shibuya Station in November 2014, but was later turned away because he continuously caused trouble, they said.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/07/06/national/crime-legal/man-arrested-allegedly-chopping-off-ballet-instructors-thumb-tokyo/#.WPBolqIlHD4

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Who is saying it always the victim's fault? You obviously don't understand a strawman argument because you keep committing the same major fallacy like a few others on this thread.

A strawman - that's where someone builds up an argument not justified the facts, then cuts it down right?

Like saying without actually knowing, 'There are always signs', then cutting it down with 'If people are simply ignoring these situations that quite often happens in Japan then that is problem.'

I think you need to look in the mirror before accusing other people of not knowing what a strawman argument is.

Hashimoto began taking lessons at the ballet school near JR Shibuya Station in November 2014, but was later turned away because he continuously caused trouble, they said.

Sorry, where does that say that the instructor had any knowledge of this whatsoever?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@Strangerland

A strawman - that's where someone builds up an argument not justified the facts, then cuts it down right?

No, I was right. You don't know!

A straw man is a weak or imaginary opposition (as an argument or adversary) set up only to be easily confuted.

For example:

Strangerland said, "Well you know, other than the fact that the victim is always at fault, right?"

No one on this thread has made that claim.

Sorry, where does that say that the instructor had any knowledge of this whatsoever?

How could she not know? She is the teacher of the class. The students didn't tell her? The staff didn't tell her? She didn't see any of that in class. That logic makes less sense than your strawman argument that you didn't understand. That would make my previous even more valid!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A straw man is a weak or imaginary opposition (as an argument or adversary)

Ahh I see, like claiming 'There are always signs' without there actually being any evidence as to the person having been privy to any signs.

No one on this thread has made that claim.

Sure, it was a bit of rhetoric based on your blaming the victim.

How could she not know?

You're the one making the claim that she had to know, it's up to you to prove she knew.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ahh I see, like claiming 'There are always signs' without there actually being any evidence as to the person having been privy to any signs.

No, that's not it. LOL!

You're the one making the claim that she had to know, it's up to you to prove she knew.

I don't have to prove she knew. By her not knowing, it proves everything that I said early was correct by proving her lack of awareness. Wow! you really don't know what a "Strawman" argument means.

I hope you never have to defend yourself in a courtroom.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No, that's not it. LOL!

Actually, it's case in point.

I don't have to prove she knew.

You made the claim. Of course you don't have to prove it. But don't expect anyone else to take your crap seriously if you don't.

By her not knowing, it proves everything that I said early was correct by proving her lack of awareness.

And there you are back with your strawman that she must have known something.

You're going in circles of logical fallacy here mate.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And there you are back with your strawman that she must have known something.

Correction: And there you are back with your strawman that there must have been something for her to know._

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Strangerland and Silvafan, please do not post any more messages on this thread since you are going around in circles and just bickering.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Strangerland

Actually, it's case in point.

Huh?

You made the claim. Of course you don't have to prove it. But don't expect anyone else to take your crap seriously if you don't.

Stick in fork in it, mate because you are done. You are not only not making sense, but you don't even understand why, so you are getting frustrated.

You're going in circles of logical fallacy here mate.

I should take that personally, but you still haven't proven that you understand them, so I will leave it at that.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Strangerland

??? I'm thinking that must be self-projection. I'm not frustrated, and looking back at what I posted, nothing I've said could be misconstrued in that manner either.

really?

You made the claim. Of course you don't have to prove it. But don't expect anyone else to take your crap seriously if you don't.

Who's words sound more frustrated?

Anyways, you've abandoned discussion, and any attempts at supporting your claims, so there isn't anything else to say.

Yet, you are still trying to discredit me.

The points I have made stand.

What do they stand by? Making lots of points don't matter if they don't make sense. (Fallacy)

Moderator: You and Strangerland have been instructed to stop posting on this thread since you just going around in circles and bickering. Please follow the moderator's instructions.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The perpetrator is clearly wrong and I think his act is premeditated. I can't fathom how this would not be premeditated. One does not do this to just get revenge on the spot. I am speculating but I think he had romantic feelings for her and was disregarded. It may have been an act of passion in the moment but to just hammer her thumb to severe it takes some thought. I think if it was just an act of the heat of passion, he would have just killed her. Morbid but I think true.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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