Prince Hisahito is second in line to the throne, after his father, the brother of Emperor Naruhito Photo: POOL/AFP/File
crime

Man gets suspended sentence for placing knives on prince's desk

7 Comments
By KOJI SASAHARA

A Japanese man who left two kitchen knives on the school desk of Japan's Prince Hisahito, who is second in line to the throne, was given a suspended sentence on Friday.

The man was handed an 18-month sentence, suspended for four years, a Tokyo district court spokesman told AFP.

Kaoru Hasegawa was arrested in April on suspicion of illegally entering the premises of the junior high school that the prince attends.

He was also accused of violating Japan's firearms law.

The prince was not at school when the knives were apparently placed on his desk. They were later found by school officials.

Hisahito, 13, is the son of Emperor Naruhito's younger brother Akishino, who is first in line to the throne.

The presiding judge said Friday that Hasegawa "carried out the crime because of selfish thoughts that he wanted to get attention," according to public broadcaster NHK.

"There's no room for leniency," the judge said.

The incident came as authorities were beefing up security ahead of the abdication of the popular former emperor Akihito after a 30-year reign.

Threats to the imperial family are relatively rare. In 1975, Akihito was almost hit by a Molotov cocktail in Okinawa, a major World War II battlefield where there was strong anti-emperor sentiment.

Japan's Chrysanthemum Throne can only be inherited by a male heir, according to the Imperial Household Law, in place since 1947. That has raised the prospect of a succession crisis if Hisahito does not have a son.

© 2020 AFP

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

7 Comments
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"There's no room for leniency," the judge said.

The suspended sentence directly contradicts this statement.

This nutter entered a school without authorization and put knives on a students desk. He needs some dork of incarceration, whether prison or a mental health facility) and his mental health monitored.

Sweet “justice” system.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Well, at least no one could say the prince got a "bonus" for being in a higher status than the defendant :-)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Chip Star - exactly.

What a weird statement by the judge - no room for leniency and that's exactly what he dished out.

And esp weird when a combination of knives, illegally tresspassing and the royal family come into context, is just about as socially / criminally provocative as one could get in Japan.

Shudder to think if the culprit was non-Japanese.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The outcome prove Japan is FOS, if a non J did it would be the end of them. The Judge is a a dim wit.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

That sentence should not have been suspended. I do not even care that the kid was royalty. Threatening children should be unacceptable no matter whose offspring they are.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The outcome prove Japan is FOS, if a non J did it would be the end of them. The Judge is a a dim wit.

It proves nothing at all about non Japanese.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

He was also accused of violating Japan's firearms law.

Never knew a knife was a firearm. I guess the official law is the Swords and Firearms Possession Control Law

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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