crime

Model told by police to 'talk it out' with stalker who came to her door

47 Comments
By grape Japan

Japanese plus-sized model and social activist Marie Egbuchulam is not one to keep quiet about sexual harassment and assault of women in Japan. She recently criticized the country's existing efforts to deal with chikan (groping) incidents in Japan as lacking with her own alternative posters.

Egbuchulam recently took to Twitter to express further frustration regarding such incidents, this time with a personal episode in which she was left aghast at police response to an encounter with an apparent stalker.

In the below Twitter thread, Egbuchulam recounts her story.

Screen Shot 2020-08-08 at 10.17.58.png

"I don't really want to write this, but I wanted advice. I saw that a young man who I did not know had suddenly bypassed my residence's autolock and come to my home. I was scared so I reported it to the police. Two officers came, so I thought I was safe, but they told me 'The man says he won't leave until he talks to you. You're both adults so why don't you try speaking face to face?' Huh? If I just talk to the perpetrator what's the point of calling 110 (number for police in Japan)?"

Egbuchulam elaborates further on the encounter, saying that when she became upset and asked why the police couldn't deal with something obviously illegal and that if she were to talk to the man, there would be no need for police, one officer left on his bike saying "Well, do as you wish." Stunned, she called the police station's Community Safety Section, but was told halfheartedly by someone there to just have the remaining officer assist her. "I ended up talking over the fence with the perpetrator for over three hours in a bizarre conversation. The officer just stood next to me absentmindedly," Egbuchulam writes.

After the uknown man went home, Egbuchulam says that the officer who had previously left returned on his bike without apology and simply said "Oh, so the guy went home huh."

Egbuchulam concludes by expressing "Next time if I were to get stabbed, if I call 110 the police from this same jurisdiction will come. I don't want to call 110, and I can't trust the police...why does the victim always have to live a life of moving, running, and hiding? It's not that easy for me to just move."

Responses to the Tweets have largely been supportive, but also highlight that Japan's Anti-Stalking laws, which were greatly revised after the murder of Shiori Ino in the wake of derelict police attention, often do not result in immediate confrontation or arrest. As the Japan Times details with a helpful chart, police response to complaints of stalking can sometimes require multiple submissions of evidence which are met with a series of admonishments to the actual stalker.

Because of this, many replying to the thread recommended recording and documenting both the perpetrator's activity as well as that of the police, and consulting with a civil agency and lawyer.

Which, of course, returns to Egbuchulam's frustration with the purpose of calling the police in the first place.

Read more stories from grape Japan.

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© grape Japan

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

47 Comments
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I saw that a young man who I did not know had suddenly bypassed my residence's autolock and come to my home. I was scared so I reported it to the police. Two officers came, so I thought I was safe, but they told me 'The man says he won't leave until he talks to you. You're both adults so why don't you try speaking face to face?'

So stranger or it could be neighbour, but when he won't leave until he talks to her, that's obviously not an ordinary neighbour. Officer suggest just to talk? How do they know that person come uninvited didn't bring any weapon? There are lot of troubled fan out there.

21 ( +21 / -0 )

Two officers came, so I thought I was safe, but they told me 'The man says he won't leave until he talks to you. You're both adults so why don't you try speaking face to face?' Huh? If I just talk to the perpetrator what's the point of calling 110 (number for police in Japan)?"

So if a shady-looking guy keeps tailing me and is at my doorstep, I should just convince them to stop? What kind of utopia are these idiots living in? There wouldn't be a need for lawyers, police and the military if people could just talk everything out. I feel sorry for this woman, but the state failed her. How about I lay down the law myself since we're both adults and can settle this issue ourselves. This article really made my day, just goes to show how governments work in a nutshell.

22 ( +22 / -0 )

I have seen several cases of this in Japan and have moved due to an aggressive stalking neighbor.

It is a problem...

24 ( +24 / -0 )

Stalkers are encouraged when they are given attention, including negative attention.

That the police do not know this, and actually made it the victim's responsibility, is terrifying.

Please keep this in mind the next time you read any stories about women who don't bother reporting sexual harassment or assault in Japan. This is why - incompetent police who blame victims and make it their responsibility.

Women know this happens, which is why they don't want to deal with police and be further subjected to misogyny.

23 ( +23 / -0 )

And thus why Japan has such a low crime rate. Cos the boys in blue avoid paperwork like I avoid mosquitoes,

pathetic really/really pathetic.

19 ( +21 / -2 )

Stupid police.

16 ( +17 / -1 )

Jesus Christ, this is unbelievable. Just when you thought you've heard the worst about useless Japanese policemen, then you hear something even more shocking. This is way past eye-rolling. This just means that victims in Japan are all by themselves. Why are we paying these policemen's salaries? These men wouldn't even make it into the junior cadets outside Japan.

I hope she makes an official complaint and takes it further. These policemen should be fired.

18 ( +20 / -2 )

Stupid police, no stupid girl who spent what " "I ended up talking over the fence with the perpetrator for over three hours" It doesn't take but 1 minute to say "hey look I'm not interested in you". This person is mental sick and needs real help and therapy. Too paranoid that doesn't help anyone.

-13 ( +3 / -16 )

While sad and appalling, it is hardly surprising, and is even worse when you think that absolutely nothing happened to those (probably all male) cops. No re-training, reprimand, nothing. If they happen to hear or read the story somewhere , they would probably still be wondering what all the fuss was about. Shabby work and a lackadaisical attitude like this is quite common.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

Something tells me the stalker would have been arrested had he been a foreigner.

18 ( +20 / -2 )

Firstly,

MOD:

Japanese plus-sized model and social activities 

You mean activist.

Secondly,

This is horrifying, but it is nothing that hasn't been said before; nothing that isn't supported by anyone who has said something akin to:

Why was that woman so rude? I was only paying her a compliment.

*If I hadn't persisted, my partner would never have gone out with me.*

or

Why didn't that guy just try talking to her, instead of stalking her/ groping her/ breaking into her apartment and stealing her belongings / assaulting her / raping her?

EVERY time someone says something like that, agrees with someone who says something like that, or lets slide a comment like that, they are supporting this attitude shown by the police - one of sympathy towards the aggressor, and doubt towards the victim.

There is nothing that women can do to protect themselves:

When women speak out about this rape culture -

(which means a culture that is weighted against the victim, which allows rapes to continue with the use of shaming and disbelief)

they are mocked, doubted, accused of lying.

When women stay silent they are blamed for that, and accused of lying.

When women retaliate, they are arrested - remember that women are told not to fight their rapist. Oh, and accused of lying.

When women do pretty much anything, they are shouted down and accused of lying.

Screw that. Lock up every single man who can't control himself.

"She was my type"? Lock him up.

"I was drunk."? Lock him up.

"I couldn't help myself."? Lock him up.

"She' is/was my girlfriend / partner/wife/date so I'm allowed."? Lock them up.

The more of these men locked up, the safer the world will be.

Those police officers ought to be fired. They're trash.

10 ( +15 / -5 )

A-g-a-i-n: Japanese police are generally as useful as a screen door on a submarine. . . or less.

17 ( +17 / -0 )

What in the world did she do all the while this guy was waiting around and she called the police?

There is a hell of a lot of information missing from a one-sided article here!

"I don't really want to write this, but I wanted advice. I saw that a young man who I did not know had suddenly bypassed my residence's autolock and come to my home. I was scared so I reported it to the police. Two officers came, so I thought I was safe, but they told me 'The man says he won't leave until he talks to you. You're both adults so why don't you try speaking face to face?' Huh? If I just talk to the perpetrator what's the point of calling 110 (number for police in Japan)?"

Maybe I am missing something here, but how did this guy bypass the autolock AND get into her home? I am guessing that the autolock is to an apartment building or mansion, and then to get into her home, he would need to bypass another locked entrance, either one being illegal entry.

If it was her private entrance, he had to have broken in somehow and that alone would have been illegal entry too.

Also missing here, did the police take the guys information about who he was an what he was doing there? Why didnt she go down to the police station and file a report or make charges against the guy for illegal entry instead of just posting the encounter on sns?

If myself or anyone in my family went through what she did, I would be at the cop shop, filing a report, which would then force the police to take further action.

I highly doubt she reads JT, but it would be nice to have some of the blanks filled in.

This too seems unusual,

 Stunned, she called the police station's Community Safety Section, but was told halfheartedly by someone there to just have the remaining officer assist her. "I ended up talking over the fence with the perpetrator for over three hours in a bizarre conversation. The officer just stood next to me absentmindedly," Egbuchulam writes.

So in the middle of having a discussion with this guy, she looks up, and calls this police safety section, and talks to another police officer, who gives her "advice" to have the "remaining" officer assist her.

All the while this "stalker" is listening to her conversation along with the other officer as well?

Something here makes me scratch my head.

Something obviously happened, but this is in no way the "rest of the story".

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

The problem is that we can't criminalise everyone who rings your doorbell unexpectedly and wants to have a chat, especially if this is their first and only visit. If you choose to adopt a high profile as a fashion model and activist, it's natural that more people in the community will want to speak with you if they know where you live. This is ultimately a You problem, not a police problem. The police are not a private security force to shield celebrities from their fans. If and when the fan keeps returning repeatedly after being asked to leave, or the stabbing starts, then by all means call 110.

-19 ( +2 / -21 )

I ended up talking over the fence with the perpetrator for over three hours in a bizarre conversation. The officer just stood next to me absentmindedly," Egbuchulam writes.

After the uknown man went home, Egbuchulam says that the officer who had previously left returned on his bike without apology and simply said "Oh, so the guy went home huh."

Also this is REALLY weird, even for the weirdness of cops here. Two cops come, one suddenly leaves the scene, and is gone for OVER THREE HOURS?????? And one "absentmindedly" just stands there during the entire conversation? The the other one returns returns, says nothing besides "Oh, so the guy went home huh." and then they both leave?

What was the "bizarre" conversation about? All the while a cop is standing there for the same THREE HOURS?

Where did the "other" cop go for all that time? Play pachinko? Take some pics of someone? I mean really this is totally bizarre here.

Something sounds pretty damn strange about the entire encounter, and she should be following this up with "higher-ups" in the police department as well.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Police in Japan dont and wont protect anyone.

Better to just pay protection fees to local criminal groups if you think you are really under threat

11 ( +11 / -0 )

These two police officers, have not only failed in their duty of care to protect Marie Egbuchulam from an alleged stalker, accused of bypassing Marie Egbuchulam residence’s auto-lock.

M3, my friend the stalker neglected to push the intercom.

In essence committed an act of trespass/ breaking and entering.

Both officers have brought there local Koban/Police into legitimate claims of incompetence/disrepute , victim neglect, also  exposed to themselves to charges of misconduct.

girl_in_tokyo makes a well-grounded convincing assessment……

Stalkers are encouraged when they are given attention, including negative attention,

That the police do not know this, and actually made it the victim's responsibility, is terrifying.  

There is also a danger, failure of individual police officers to take stalker harassment seriously, the public will resort to personal self-defense measures i.e. tactical stun gun anti-grab technology, serious stopping power delivering 3,800,000, 2.0 Ampere working current, LED forward flash array plus 2.5 mA discharge.

I guarantee the alleged stalker will find the bell next time round

Now, let not go down this path.

Japanese plus-sized model?

Really? would a few extra salads have made any difference?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

I was wondering if the cops knew the guy and wanted to protect him.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What are the rules on autolock and trespass? If you sneak in when a different resident or their visitor has gone in and are not welcome by the person you are trying to see, is that trespass? Shouldn't the police simply escort the person out of the building? I ask this because I've got two daughters who'll probably end up living in the city on their own for uni or work.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Well, has to shame the stalker and police officers into submission by filming their behaviour.

Stick that on youtube, see what happens.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Maybe I am missing something here, but how did this guy bypass the autolock AND get into her home? I am guessing that the autolock is to an apartment building or mansion, and then to get into her home, he would need to bypass another locked entrance, either one being illegal entry.

If you are a stalker you’d just wait for a tenant to enter and tail them inside. Not difficult at all.

The police response is almost criminal, the stalker could have attacked her and the police wouldn’t have done much...

3 ( +5 / -2 )

If you are a stalker you’d just wait for a tenant to enter and tail them inside. Not difficult at all.

Yet this is an assumption on your part, all the article states is that "he bypassed my residence's autolock and come to my home", which to mean sounds like breaking and entering.

Her home, not her apartment or mansion.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

These plus-sized models are making bank in Japan, but any model, if you're going to be in the public eye, you better expect more than a few crazes to pop their head over your fence. And yes, don't expect much help from おまわりさん.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Raising the issue once again of just what sort of training Japanese cops receive...

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Yet this is an assumption on your part, 

It sure is, but I am stating a possibility not a certainty.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@itsonlyrocknroll

M3, my friend the stalker neglected to push the intercom.

In essence committed an act of trespass/ breaking and entering.

First, we haven't established that he meets the definition of a stalker. The colloquial definition differs significantly from the legal one. To meet the legal definition under under the ストーカー行為等の規制等に関する法律 you must carry out certain prohibited acts while being motivated by either romantic feelings or by resentment. This is why the NHK man can never be arrested for stalking no matter how often he turns up at my door. Without knowing why this man showed up at the model's home it's impossible to say whether or not he was legally a stalker. If he just wanted to chat about her modelling or her activism or body positivity, then he cannot be arrested for stalking in Japan. The fact that police took no action strongly suggests that his motivations fell outside the scope of the anti-stalking law. To assume otherwise is speculation. Being a weirdo and creeping out young women is not an arrestable offence, at least not yet.

Second, neglecting to push the intercom is not a crime (Negligence, by definition, is not a crime). All visitors have implied permission to enter your private property to press a doorbell or knock on your door. Installing an intercom at the edge of your property (I'm assuming this is a house) does not necessarily mean that people become automatic trespassers if they don't elect to use it. There may be deaf, blind, or other physically disabled people who aren't able to use your preferred technology. If you install a locked gate or a fence, then the situation is a bit different but there is no indication that this was the case here. Again, the fact that the police did not arrest him for trespassing makes it reasonable to assume he didn't. Of course, we could spend all day assuming certain facts and speculating.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Pretty lacklustre handling of the matter by Police. At the least they could have spoken to the guy and outlined potential offences/charges should he continue. Is there a mechanism up there to make complaints about this sort of thing?

Wonder if there was enough for a trespass charge, similar to what the Aussie guy got when he tried to visit his kids at his outlaws’ place?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

 If and when the fan keeps returning repeatedly after being asked to leave, or the stabbing starts, then by all means call 110.

oh yes lets call the police after we've got a knife in the neck, crime is about prevention, if youve got a mentally ill person continues to harrass you talking it out with then isnt going to help. Police need to talk to the guy remind him that there are anti stalking laws , if you continue to stalk this lady and she calls to complain , well arrest you.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Surely, the stalker could have been, should have been arrested for trespassing. He "bypassed my residence's autolock."

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Okay. So what exactly does anyone want done about it and is that currently legally possible? Anybody? Any ideas at all?

Oh, someone said arrest. Okay. On what charge and what is the evidence for the charge exactly? Her word alone? Assuming that's sufficient, hold him for how long? He is definitely not coming back later because they arrested him once? Problem solved? Or he never would have come if he felt arrest was likely? Problem solved?

"Next time if I were to get stabbed, if I call 110 the police from this same jurisdiction will come."

They would have come if you had been stabbed straight off the bat and someone called them. The point is that something needs to be done to ensure you don't get stabbed. What is that something? Complain? Scream? Pray? What?

"It's not that easy for me to just move."

Its not that easy for anybody. So maybe the person you need to contact is your landlord so you can have extra security put in place. Or perhaps you should have chosen a place with better security in the first place considering your profession?

And if you are really that worthy of a model perhaps you have the money to hire a body guard, cause the police ain't it.

And anyone that wants to give me a shellacking for this post better have some answers that are 1) legal and 2) possible. Pounding on the table and whining is not a solution.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Police need to talk to the guy remind him that there are anti stalking laws , if you continue to stalk this lady and she calls to complain , well arrest you.

And what is your evidence they didn't? And if they did and he comes back and stabs her are you willing to stand your ground and insist the police did exactly what they were supposed to do by reminding him of the law and threatening him with arrest? I am pretty sure that exact scenario has happened before.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

M3, I think we can agree that a conviction of a crime has not taken place.

So let’s review Marie Egbuchulam, twiiter allegations…..

"I don't really want to write this, but I wanted advice. I saw that a young man who I did not know had suddenly bypassed my residence's auto lock and come to my home. I was scared so I reported it to the police. Two officers came, so I thought I was safe, but they told me 'The man says he won't leave until he talks to you. You're both adults so why don't you try speaking face to face?' Huh? If I just talk to the perpetrator what's the point of calling 110 (number for police in Japan)?"

"Bypassed my residence's auto lock and come to my home"

Now, I am led to believe the Dwelling Rights law, the penalty for trespassing, illegally entering a residence, dwelling, building, or ship, is punishable by a maximum of 3 years and/or a maximum fine of ¥100,000.

So deliberately bypassing the auto lock and allegedly entering Marie Egbuchulam home is a criminal act and/or could be construed as trespassing, a criminal offense in Japanese civil law.

"I ended up talking over the fence with the perpetrator for over three hours in a bizarre conversation. The officer just stood next to me absentmindedly," Egbuchulam writes.

The act of allegedly bypassing the auto lock. Is a criminal offense. so should have been thoroughly investigated. To spend the next three hours in conversation through a fence is truly remarkable. Is this official police policy or procedures? I think not

Marie Egbuchulam needs to retain a lawyer, and purse redress if necessary through theJudiciary.

The issue in question is the behavior of the two officers. This is where an independent investigation should begin.

Is this a dereliction of duty?

 If the public lose confidence, and believe the police are failing in their duty to serve the community and protect all persons against illegal acts, then it’s a slippery slope.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The police here really need to be better educated about how to deal with the victims of stalkers. I know someone who has had experience with reporting one to the police and the officers confronted her with a very dismissive attitude and comments ("Maybe he just likes you?") similar to what the person in the article experienced.

In contrast, I got punched in the face once while walking down the street by some random nut job. I went to the koban and reported it to the police. They were very professional, treated me with respect and recorded my statement, photographed the evidence (small injury on my face) and left me feeling like they were taking it seriously. They never caught the guy and I have no idea if they ever seriously tried to find him, but at least they left me feeling that my concerns were taken seriously.

I think the difference probably relates to the fact that police officers generally come from demographics which are not often targeted by stalkers, so they just don't even understand how threatening and scary that can be to a person who is more vulnerable. So they get dismissve about it right off the bat. Getting punched in the face though? They can immediately understand what that is and why its a problem and so they treat it seriously from the start.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Vanessa Carlisle Today 12:37 pm JST

Okay. So what exactly does anyone want done about it and is that currently legally possible? Anybody? Any ideas at all? Oh, someone said arrest. Okay. On what charge

Tresspassing into a building by bypassing the lock is illegal and you can be arrested for that. You can also be given a verbal warning for stalking.

and what is the evidence for the charge exactly? Her word alone? Assuming that's sufficient, hold him for how long?

The fact that he was in her building is evidence. And yes, "her word alone" is sufficient for a verbal warning in regard to stalking. Why wouldn't it be? Do you think women go around accusing random men whom they haven't ever met of stalking?

He is definitely not coming back later because they arrested him once? Problem solved? Or he never would have come if he felt arrest was likely? Problem solved?

It's often quite difficult to get a stalker to give up and stop. The chances of them stopping will be higher if the police scare him with warnings of arrest, rather than forcing the victim to speak to him. Forcing the victim to speak to him will only encourage him - now he thinks that he can talk to her whenever he wants, and the police will oblige him.

They would have come if you had been stabbed straight off the bat and someone called them. The point is that something needs to be done to ensure you don't get stabbed. What is that something? Complain? Scream? Pray? What?

Then it would be too late, wouldn't it. The point is to discourage the stalker so that he is less likely to come back and bother her again - but instead their actions will likely encourage him.

Its not that easy for anybody. So maybe the person you need to contact is your landlord so you can have extra security put in place.

Landlords are not responsible for personal security of tenants and are not legally obligated to provide "extra security" for individual residents.

Or perhaps you should have chosen a place with better security in the first place considering your profession?

This is pretty blatant victim-blaming.

And if you are really that worthy of a model

There is no need to demean her profession or otherwise suggest that she is not worthy of police protection because she is a model

perhaps you have the money to hire a body guard, cause the police ain't it.

So you agree that the police aren't doing their job?

And anyone that wants to give me a shellacking for this post better have some answers that are 1) legal and 2) possible. Pounding on the table and whining is not a solution.

Done!

7 ( +8 / -1 )

My local Constabulary /Koran Ino, are a credit to the community. Professional and dedicated. When on business abroad visit to make sure my property secure.

Twice yearly hold community seminars to advise on local issues and matters relating to traffic incidents.

It is disappointing to read that there could be few letting the side down.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@itsonlyrocknroll

So deliberately bypassing the auto lock and allegedly entering Marie Egbuchulam home is a criminal act and/or could be construed as trespassing, a criminal offense in Japanese civil law.

I think we might be working from a radically different perception of what happened. I agree that it would have been a serious crime for him to set foot inside her home, but I don't think that's what's being alleged. When she says that someone 'came' to her home, I read that to mean an unexpected visitor suddenly appeared on her property, but not necessarily that he entered the private spaces of her home. Perhaps I'm missing the nuance as a non-native speaker?

I'm deducing that we're probably talking about a standalone home (since we know there is a fence to talk through). There is probably a pillar with a mailbox and "autolock" (intercom) as usual. There might be a gate which is probably not closed or locked most of the time. The man did not ring the intercom but walked onto the property and up to the main entrance door. Again, this is just what I'm imagining based on the information and tone of the tweet and the assumption that the police response was reasonable. I might be wrong of course.

To spend the next three hours in conversation through a fence is truly remarkable. Is this official police policy or procedures? I think not

The issue in question is the behavior of the two officers. This is where an independent investigation should begin.

It's remarkable that she agreed to talk for 3 hours (and perhaps even more remarkable that they didn't run out of conversation topics), but I'm not sure it amounts to misconduct or a dereliction of duty on the part of the police to suggest this or to stand by, just in case. The decision to speak with the man would have been hers alone even if it was proposed by the police.

Marie Egbuchulam needs to retain a lawyer, and purse redress if necessary through theJudiciary.

I'm not sure the police have caused her any damages. If the man returns and harms her perhaps she will have a case but since he never returned, it seems that the risk assessment done by the police was spot on.

Honestly, unless there is more to the story I have to give the police a solid A here. They were reasonable and restrained. They respected the civil rights of someone who was probably mentally-ill in approaching and trying to interact with other members of his community in a non-violent way (entirely legal), and they stood by to ensure the physical safety of a young woman who felt threatened by the situation. Everyone received the full protection of the law.

Don't get me wrong, I would be terrified if this man showed up at my door, but I also understand that it's not the duty of the police to preempt every possible crime or shield us from every uncomfortable interaction or every mentally unstable member of our society. Being a celebrity has its downsides and this is one of them.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Done!

So you believe that arresting him (which I already covered) is one part of the solution and the other part is for police to attempt to scare him (which I also covered). Have I got that correct? Are those the only solutions you have and their end goal is to simply make him coming back "less likely"? I want to be completely clear that is what you are saying.

Also I want to make sure you understand that I never said landlords had any such legal obligation and they actually don't need it to consider the safety of their tenants. Some actually care. Also nowhere is it written that police forced her to talk to him. I will ask nicely, once, for you to please not try to put words in my mouth.

So you agree that the police aren't doing their job?

No. I said police are not body guards (which is why the profession of "body guard" exists). Police are there trying to sort out a dispute between two citizens and to ascertain which one is the problem (or both) they need to ask questions which may seem ridiculous to the abused party or parties. We all want cops to take our side but guess what? There are a ton of liars out there and the police have the unfortunate task of having to figure out who they are.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The police are not a private security force to shield celebrities from their fans.

No, they're a public security force to protect members of the public, including celebrities, from crime.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Tresspassing into a building by bypassing the lock is illegal and you can be arrested for that. 

For the avoidance of confusion, an "autolock" is just an invented Japanese word for what we might call an intercom/buzzer.

I think the evidence points towards this being a house rather than a high-rise apartment building. The fact that they end up talking through a fence (probably straddling the property line) and she mentions the police returning on a bicycle point to it being a house. If it was a high-rise apartment, how would she know that the police returned on a bicycle instead of a patrol car or motorcycle?

@Ascissor

No, they're a public security force to protect members of the public, including celebrities, from crime.

Sure, but the difficulty here is naming the crime and explaining exactly how each element has been made out. If I were to knock on my neighbour's door for the first time and ask to have a chat, I've commited absolutely no crime. If it turns out that my neighbour has no idea who I am and becames completely creeped out by the situation, it doesn't suddenly turn into a crime. For better or worse, the same principle applies to a mentally unstable man who wants to talk with the local plus sized fashion model.

So if I "neglect" to report part of the CEO's compensation in an annual securities report, no foul?

Exactly. Negligence denotes the absence of knowledge or criminal intent. This is why Carlos Ghosn (as the director directly responsible for reporting executive compensation) was charged while directors who were tasked with other responsibilities were not charged despite ultimately signing off on the same annual reports.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

M3 I admire your tolerance, and propensity for permissive faith in humanity, the befit of the doubt.  

And quite rightly the alleged perpetrator, did not attempt to break into Marie Egbuchulam residence.

I have a detached home, walled and gated with a camera intercom system. the “gates” and side entrance door automatically/hydraulically close and lock.

Now if a person seeks to evade the system, I would expect the police to investigate and apprehend the suspect.

What I will not tolerate is having to entertain a three-hour counseling session through the boundary fence with a potential lunatic, whilst officer dibble stands there twiddling there thumbs.

If any person is suspected of deliberately attempting to bypassing my intercom entry system, in doing so are a threat.

The police officer/s who attend the scene must arrest the suspect and carry out all the necessary background checks, and formally interview.

No ifs or buts, no oohing “n” aahing, and certainly no fence line chats.    

 

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@itsonlyrocknroll

M3 I admire your tolerance, and propensity for permissive faith in humanity, the befit of the doubt. 

I'm not sure it's tolerance or a faith in humanity. I wouldn't be tolerant if a stalker was harassing me or my family. I think it's just being realistic and aware of how limited police powers are in these cases and how difficult it is for any country to draft strong anti-stalking laws without trampling basic civil liberties.

I have a detached home, walled and gated with a camera intercom system. the “gates” and side entrance door automatically/hydraulically close and lock.

Now if a person seeks to evade the system, I would expect the police to investigate and apprehend the suspect.

That sounds like a nice secure compound. I'd agree that anyone scaling your walls or trying to breach the gate should be treated as a tresspasser in the same way as someone climbing through a window. The grey area starts when you leave that gate open or you have a walkway leading up to your front door.

What I will not tolerate is having to entertain a three-hour counseling session through the boundary fence with a potential lunatic, whilst officer dibble stands there twiddling there thumbs.

Yes. And this is the part that makes me most reluctant to accept the story at face value. Despite 3 hours of talking, we are never told why the man showed up. Did he come to ask her out on a date? Did he come to discuss the illuminati? The easiest way to convince me that he was dangerous and that the police acted unreasonably would be to give some indication of just how crazy he was, assuming he was crazy, and assuming he was a stranger. I suspect there is much much more to the story.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Name and shame these policeman, then ask them to talk it out when there is s backlash

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Look, is not like the police can do anything to him. Because he hasn't committed any crimes and not all fans are violent. The best the police can do is to protect her while she talked it out with the fan. Police aren't private security guards that can stand there all day protecting her while they is needed elsewhere. The fact that they send 2 men to her and one even stay for that long is already within their limits. Unless he had really groped her, they might able to do something but all this is out of their hands. The anti-stalk law does have to change and become more strict but other than that the police really couldn't do anything else at that situation.

I think the reason the other one left for awhile was because he is needed elsewhere and knows his partner has the situation under control. Just my opinion.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Are the cops afraid of the guy?

All they gotta do is talk to him, and if he has no business there, then it's time for him to move on because he's scaring the residents

5 ( +5 / -0 )

""social activist "" ???

This is the key phrase, same as a whistle blower in Japan, the police, the city office, the consumers protection agency, and most news outlets don't won't to deal with the issues that matters or ROCK THE BOAT they love it when all just nod and bow.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The anti-stalk law does have to change and become more strict 

The law can't get much stricter in a free society. What is an anti-stalking law at its core? It's a law that criminalizes certain speech, movement, and human interaction. These aren't easy things to ban or to take lightly. You won't find a single country in the western world where victims groups are satisfied with the police response to stalking or the strength of anti-stalking laws. There is no easy solution for us.

Ironically, the countries which take stalking of young women most seriously are the repressive tribal societies like Saudi Arabia and Afghanistan. The police there will not hesitate to arrest any strange man who tries to approach and speak with a women without her or her family's or her male guardian's express permission.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Minimum viable policing: "You're not welcome. Kindly leave."

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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