crime

MtGox founder gets suspended sentence for data tampering: acquitted of embezzlement

23 Comments
By Miwa Suzuki

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© 2019 AFP

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23 Comments
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I speculate that the Yakuza infiltrated Mt.Gox and stole the BitCoins. Often when the "real culprits" are not found in Japan, it usually turns out to be Yakuza related.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

They caught the guy a Russian in Cyprus who hacked mtgox.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Outrageous, I remember hearing reports about employees at the firm saying that Karpeles was wasting money left right and center on personal purchases, how the hell was he not charged with embezzlement?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Madden Today  11:44 am JST

how the hell was he not charged with embezzlement?

He was charged with it. But he was acquitted.

Second paragraph in the article.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Japan, where justice is convoluted and a suspended sentance the best option over embarrassing anyone.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

It is a flawed Judicial system, they let him free because they are worried about their image abroad, he stole the bit coins clear and simple, no hack and nothing, its a PONZI scheme

1 ( +6 / -5 )

He was charged with it. But he was acquitted.

I am assuming @Madden probably meant "convicted" when writing that.

The Tokyo District Court suspended the sentence for four years.

So, here is an interesting question. He was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in jail but suspended the sentence for four years.

So.... did the court, in suspending his sentence, require that he remain in Japan for the next 4 years?? I mean, how is this supposed to work? Nothing about this in the article.

Also, you have to imagine the prosecutors are going to appeal this result.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

the odds were stacked against Karpeles but he escaped with a light sentence. A real miracle

This kind of sentence is the best that Ghosn can hope

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Enjoy other people's money. Party time!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

DId you see the pic they posted of him yesterday? Looks like he put on about 30 kilos!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The odds were stacked against Karpeles as the vast majority of cases that come to trial in Japan end in a conviction.

And he was convicted!

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

@ShavedNuts:

I love your name. Laughed out loud and made my boss nearly spin his head off. I think this is a great result. Mr. Karpeles enjoy your freedom and future. The prosecutor obviously did not prove that he stole the bitcoins. Hip Hip Hooray!!!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

JenniSchiebel

I always debate our Judicial system and the powers that be, not just for rich individuals, for all people. The powers that be connected to the Keinandren and other lobbyist groups have an agenda, foremore also if it is foreigner related they worry about the image abroad.

Karpeles is guilty as sin, it was a clear ponzi scheme, lets say hypothetical his lawyers claim of being 'hacked' was true, wouldnt the cyber crime division or similar agencies, track the trail of the hackers? if they can track stolen credit card information and other strange things online, why could they not track these so called hackers.. it is just lies..

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

DeadforgoodToday  12:35 pm JST

“DId you see the pic they posted of him yesterday? Looks like he put on about 30 kilos!”

I think it was actually the other way around. Around the time the whole issue came to light and of his arrest, Karpeles looked like the picture used today. Later (while in detention?) he lost a lot of weight and I think the photo used on yesterday’s article was taken sometime after he got out on bail, so more recently than today’s photo.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Educator60 you are correct. He lost the weight while in detention. I remember him fat when he was arrested

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@DeadforgoodToday  12:35 pm JST

DId you see the pic they posted of him yesterday? Looks like he put on about 30 kilos!

Likely the other way around no...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Personally, I believe he actually did the theft. The reason being that he was skimming a few coins off over the course of years.

I believe he used this as a way to finance his lifestyle. You simply don't find an external wallet with the missing coins unless you are either responsible or you know of the person that is responsible.

Did one man really destroy the entire belief in the investment market in Japan? I don't think so at all. There have been far worst cases in Japan that have accounted for much higher loss.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Perhaps, I was a little confused. Hope he can keep the weight down after being released!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Will he now be subjected to civil lawsuits?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Seems like the right decision.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Just hope he doesn't go too ostentatious too early. That look is never good.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Of course he did the theft. You have employee accounts of the guy spending company (ie investors & customers) money to cover his extravagant rent, furnishings and other frivolous expenditures - so then all of a sudden when the customers accounts are hacked, but not his, he suddenly is to be believed he's not a scammer or thief? Yea, ok...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

When you invest in something, ask yourself, who are you giving your money to, and do you really trust them with it ?

If not, I'll gladly take it from you and invest it for you... for a fee.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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