crime

U.S. Navy filing homicide charges against 2 ship commanders

17 Comments

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Nice to see the Navy properly investigating and more importantly DOING something to have it's members take responsibility! At least they are not brushing it under the rug and hoping it would go away!

11 ( +11 / -0 )

This is very surprising, but lets see what happens at the Article 32 hearing. I doubt that anyone will serve any time in prison, but then again who knows, they might surprise everyone. Just hope that the people that are truly criminally at fault are the ones who get punished. The Captain needed to be relieved of his command, but the ones on deck at the time are the ones most criminally responsible in my book.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm very skeptical since those involved are officers and officers are usually just encouraged to retire

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Makes sense, that is a lot of unnecessary deaths and someone should be held accountable

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Gee, i guess it wasn't the cargo ship's fault after all then

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The Navy has a history of coming down hard on individual Commanders when mishaps occur, even when the problems are primarily systemic. See, Adm. Kimmel after Pearl Harbor. Reporting on these two incidents clearly demonstrated that the common cause was exhaustion of personnel caused by overextension of Naval assets. In other words, senior officers didn’t have the courage (or integrity) to tell SecNav or SecDef that the missions could not be performed under current levels of staffing and deployment of assets.

The Navy (alone) hews to a rigorous standard of command accountability, but risks gross mistakes in the process. In these two cases, criminal prosecution is excessive and misses the essential causes of these tragic mishaps. Disciplinary action is appropriate for all of those personnel directly implicated in this Keystone Cops tragicomedy of failure, but Court Martial is over-the-top.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

CrazyJoe Disciplinary action is appropriate for all of those personnel directly implicated in this Keystone Cops tragicomedy of failure, but Court Martial is over-the-top.

Court Martial is wholly appropriate, officers in command of ships have the lives of their men in their hands as well as powerful weapon systems, not to mention the honour and reputation of their country. Vice Adm. J. Aucoin should be grateful the US Navy are not as rough as the Royal Navy was in the 18th Century or he could face the same outcome as Adm. Byng!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

took so long?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

It fired several top leaders, including the commander of the 7th Fleet, Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin, and several other senior commanders in the Pacific.

So they were fired from the current position/posting and not from service, right? Looks like the massive bribery scandal has to some bit contributed to the navy operations.

https://www.vox.com/world/2017/11/6/16614262/fat-leonard-navy-scandal

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So they were fired from the current position/posting and not from service, right? Looks like the massive bribery scandal has to some bit contributed to the navy operations.

It's got nothing to do with any conspiracy. This is normal punishment. The top level officers that were relieved had nothing to do with the actual accident except that it happened under their command. Why would they be kicked out of the service? It would be like firing the regional manager of a bank because a teller got caught stealing money.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It's harsh but the right thing to do. The captain of a ship is given more power over their crew than most people can imagine. When they screw up, the punishment must be harsh. Privilege and responsibility go hand in hand.

Good thing Obama isn't president or this would have been his fault as well. The fat white man gets a pass.

How is that? He always got away with everything - the press made sure of that. IRS attacks on his political opponents, using the FBI to go after Trump during the election, the inept handling of Libya and the resulting deaths in Benghazi. The guy is the Teflon Don all because of the white guilt the is rife among the mainstream media. The facts never mattered - Obama was protected at all costs. It remains that way today.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The guy is the Teflon Don all because of the white guilt the is rife among the mainstream media. 

Finally one of the right admits that their hatred of Obama is based in race.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The military justice system is in may ways considerably more severe than civil law. In addition the Master of the vessel, Commander, is wholly responsible for everything that happens on his ship and has always been held accountable. Considering the circumstances of these accidents and the loss of life, I'm not at all surprised with this news.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I suppose you would rather hang everyone first then investigate right? Time is the one thing that there is an abundance of, and better to get it right, than go off half-cocked, as you seem to suggest with your comment here!

took so long?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It's got nothing to do with any conspiracy. This is normal punishment. The top level officers that were relieved had nothing to do with the actual accident except that it happened under their command. Why would they be kicked out of the service? It would be like firing the regional manager of a bank because a teller got caught stealing money.

Those involved in that mid boggling fat leonard corruption scandal are not only being fired but serving time, and that has definitely affected the 7th fleet operations, the fat leonard corruption scandal is as real as it gets, no conspiracy there.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Those involved in that mid boggling fat leonard corruption scandal are not only being fired but serving time, and that has definitely affected the 7th fleet operations, the fat leonard corruption scandal is as real as it gets, no conspiracy there.

Yes, the bribery scandal is real, except that higher level officers not being kicked out of the Navy and only being relieved has nothing to do with the scandal and has been normal punishment long before the scandal ever existed, as much as you would like to believe different, hence, a conspiracy that doesn't exist.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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