crime

Noriko Sakai's ex-husband arrested again for possession of stimulants

82 Comments

The former husband of pop singer Noriko Sakai has been arrested again for possession of stimulants, police said Wednesday.

Yuichi Takaso, 44, a self-professed surfer, was arrested in 2009 on drug charges. Sakai went missing for awhile after his arrest before surfacing, at which time she also was arrested for possession of drugs. Sakai was sentenced to 18 months in prison, suspended for three years, and a media image rehabilitation campaign followed which blamed her drug use on her husband's bad influence.

In the latest case, Takaso was arrested after he allegedly had a container of 11.7 milliliters of a stimulant substance (AMT) mailed to his parents' house in Tokyo's Minato Ward in April, police said, according to TV Asahi. His father reported the delivery of the package to police, saying that his son had gone bad again, TV Asahi reported.

Takaso was arrested on Monday at a surfer friend's apartment in Chiba's Onju town.

© Japan Today

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

82 Comments
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Bad boys bad boys what ya gonna do when they come for you ......................

3 ( +6 / -3 )

The good part is his father. Must be pretty hard to turn your own child over to the police. I think he did the right thing.

4 ( +8 / -5 )

Some people never learn...just keep him behind bars, because if you let him out, he'll just repeat.

Yuichi Takaso, 44, a self-professed surfer

"a self-professed surfer" LOL...that sounds exhausting...

Sakai was sentenced to 18 months in prison, suspended for three years, and a media image rehabilitation campaign followed which blamed her drug use on her husband’s bad influence

Yeah, way to find a scapegoat for HER problems! I'm sure he held a gun up to her head and made her take drugs, just like he made her run from the law and destroy evidence...TOTAL BS and not buying it. Sakai is just as bad as her husband and should have gotten jail time.

His father reported the delivery of the package to police, saying that his son had gone bad again, TV Asahi reported

Hey hey! finally a decent parent! Props to the dad!

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

It never rains but it pours.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

A lot of the entertainment industry in Japan are on stimulants, in my previous job I've seen major avex artists fall off stage because they were so wacked out.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

The guy does sound like a loser, but jailing people because they choose to put a certain substance in their own body seems ridiculous. At best, it's a huge waste of public money and a burden on the legal system. And when this guy gets out of jail, he'll go get more drugs, not "cured" at all. Why does John Q. Public have to pay for this? Try fines, treatment, public service, even just legalize it. Just don't ask us to pay incarceration costs until a real crime is committed. Then, jail is fine.

8 ( +10 / -3 )

Not a very smart surfer.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Allegedly mailed to his house....

I know of one foreigner who was arrested because a parcel of marijuana was sent to their house. However, this was a 'birthday surprise' from a stupid friend back in the UK.

There is a chance that this is a set-up carried out as part of Sakai-san's 'media rehabilitation scheme', and I hope that the cops look into this possibility.

I know that if I was on a suspended sentence and wanted to do some drugs I certainly wouldn't rely on the Japan Post to get them to me.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Total loser!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

How did his dad know what it was?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Another suspended sentence? or was it only Sakai who got one?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Just say NO to drugs??

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

The father is a total dick, imo.

Does he suppose that snitching on his own son will benefit the son somehow?

I doubt it. Most likely he is just repulsed by the fact that his son refuses to follow the law and social norms of Japan. "Going bad" could be any behavior not approved of by the Japanese majority, for that matter.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

Some people never learn

So true. Some people never learn to just let people do their drugs in peace, but have to keep barking at the moon about it.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Does he suppose that snitching on his own son will benefit the son somehow? I doubt it. Most likely he is just repulsed by the fact that his son refuses to follow the law and social norms of Japan. "Going bad" could be any behavior not approved of by the Japanese majority, for that matter.

Although I don't believe that drugs should be illegal, the fact of the matter is, it is. He knew this, and knowingly broke the law anyways. You have to also remember that these two lame brains have kid together (who is the biggest victim here) What do you think he's gonna get out of all this. He's been disgraced by his own parents, and now he's not going to have a chance to have a normal life in school with bullying being the common treatment for kids like this.

I think the father did the best thing a father could do for his drug addicted son. Perhaps he can take a lesson on how to be a REAL caring father.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Some people never learn to just let people do their drugs in peace

It is illegal in Japan. Don't like it? Maybe you should consider working to change the law or living where it is legal.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Most likely he is just repulsed by the fact that his son refuses to follow the law.

I think most caring parents would be less than pleased if their child broke the law.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

In addition, the moron had his illegal drugs mailed to his parents' house. I think it is perfectly reasonable for them to be upset.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Don't understand how someone can call the police and say my sons gone bad again, please take him away. If its rape or murder, yeah. But not for this. You try and help him, no? Must hate his son I suppose.

Its a fishy story anyway. To arrest him the package must have been addressed to him, not the father.. so does he always open his sons mail? Or did it have a big label on it saying "drugs"? Could he not just say he knows nothing about it and it could be a set up by someone with a grudge? Then the police have to prove otherwise surely..

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Thanks, dad.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I think the father did the best thing a father could do for his drug addicted son. Perhaps he can take a lesson on how to be a REAL caring father.

How is it that a "caring" father is one who conspires to have his son thrown in jail for some petty bs like this?

I'm not seeing it.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

I think most caring parents would be less than pleased if their child broke the law

That should depend on what the law is and how independently the parents involved are able to think.

But, you are right that "most" people don't stop to think about whether the law should be followed in the first place and just obey like good little sheep. That goes for Japanese and foreigners alike.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

The father did what was natural considering the situation. A package comes to his house with a false name on it (Takaso used a different name when he ordered the drugs). The father got suspicious and opened the package to find the drugs. Takaso claims he thought they were legal when he ordered them and claims to have cancelled the order when he realized they were illegal. I call BS. Why use a false name if he thought the drugs were legal? The father has an unemployed 44 year old convicted drug users who is using his address to get illegal drugs. Everyone has a limit. This obviously was the father's. Try walking in his shoes before criticizing him.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Stranger_in_a_Strange_Land

How is it that a "caring" father is one who conspires to have his son thrown in jail for some petty bs like this?

Obviously the son had some issues and the father did what he thought was best. But it needs to be pointed out the son had the drugs sent to the parents house, and people are saying the father did the wrong thing..... What do you want him to do call the son and say "oh son your drugs turned up today!!!" get real.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

He is clearly not a productive memeber of society but his father must be a real type for reporting him and this is a total waste of police time and our money. Plus who cares?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

What do you want him to do call the son and say "oh son your drugs turned up today!!!" get real.

Straight up and thumbs up!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

But, you are right that "most" people don't stop to think about whether the law should be followed in the first place and just obey like good little sheep.

You seem to be talking about anarchy. I bet most that seem to promote it would actually hate it were it to come about.

The law is the law. Don't like it? Work to change it. Breaking it is not the answer.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

His father may have been better trying to help his son by getting him into rehab which is what he needs instead of getting his son another conviction and into prison where there is no rehab for drug use. Get his son clean then help him every step of the way to stay clean, instead the old man gives his son to the filth to deal with, which is not the right move, unless he hates his son and wants his life and his grandsons life destroyed even more than it already is.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Breaking it is not the answer.

It definitely is the answer. Trying to change the law is good, too, in the long term.

Everyone obeying the law 100% is an extremist viewpoint that I refuse to follow. I can decide for myself which laws/rules are not worth following.

I love when people say that "It's the law!" line. It's so authoritarian and conformist. Wow. Toe the line, right? No thanks.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

What do you want him to do call the son and say "oh son your drugs turned up today!!!" get real.

How about you get real. There are plenty of things he could have done without informing on his own son and likely sending him to jail for a few years.

If it were me, I would have simply thrown them away.

Wow, problem solved.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Wow. Toe the line, right? No thanks.

Yeah, sure. Say that again when someone steals your stuff because they believe they don't have to follow the law. Bet you'd be calling the police for help quick smart.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Stranger_in_a_Strange_Land

"What do you want him to do call the son and say "oh son your drugs turned up today!!!" get real."

How about you get real. There are plenty of things he could have done without informing on his own son and likely sending him to jail for a few years.

Like? Obviously his son has a drug problem as he has been caught before. How do you know that this wasnt the last straw for the father. Maybe he has had enough and this was a last resort.

If it were me, I would have simply thrown them away. Wow, problem solved.

Oh yeah and burying your head in the sand and pretending there is no problem is a great parenting method. Drugs!! What drugs. lol good idea.... And the son just keeps getting his drugs but a different way. Great method there.

I love when people say that "It's the law!" line. It's so authoritarian and conformist. Wow. Toe the line, right? No thanks.

Well if you dont like the law then thats your problem just dont complain when you end up in jail because you dont like it and do as you please.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Oh yeah and burying your head in the sand and pretending there is no problem is a great parenting method. Drugs!! What drugs. lol good idea.... And the son just keeps getting his drugs but a different way. Great method there.

It's a heck of a lot better than calling the police and having your son sent to jail. The fact that you and others are so in favor of that method, frankly, beggars belief.

Yeah, sure. Say that again when someone steals your stuff because they believe they don't have to follow the law. Bet you'd be calling the police for help quick smart.

All laws aren't created equal. And, I take care of my stuff so that it doesn't get stolen. And, last time something was stolen, no, I didn't call the police. Your whole ideology reeks of fear. Like, "without laws everything would be just anarchy and people would run around stealing, raping, and murdering". It's pure nonsense, and the police are just another gang trying to get money from you and control you.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Stranger_in_a_Strange_Land

"Oh yeah and burying your head in the sand and pretending there is no problem is a great parenting method. Drugs!! What drugs. lol good idea.... And the son just keeps getting his drugs but a different way. Great method there."

It's a heck of a lot better than calling the police and having your son sent to jail. The fact that you and others are so in favor of that method, frankly, beggars belief.

Obviously never known someone who has a drug problem hey? Sometimes it gets to the point where after a long time trying enough is enough and you need to take a tough approach. While you may be happy to pretend everything is fine and dandy most people that actually care would do something about it. And to use your words to pretend there is no problem when faced with reality frankly, beggars belief.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Cletus,

Once more I salute you. I agree 100%.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Some people never learn to just let people do their drugs in peace

If this is the case then what should society do when the "user's" prey on people to get money to supply their habits?

Personally speaking I am in a conundrum about how to deal with topics like this, because I believe that there are quite a few so called "legal" things that are a bigger scourge on society, like alcohol, or tobacco.

However since the laws of Japan have a zero tolerance policy then people who use them, import them, or sell them, should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

If someone wants to use drugs, fine, but do it in a country that supports and has legalized their use.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

How is it that a "caring" father is one who conspires to have his son thrown in jail for some petty bs like this? I'm not seeing it.

Conspire? I don't see how there is a conspiracy here. Its not like his father schemed and planned to have his son locked up from the day he was born. He has had a long history of doing drugs. He's ruined his life and ruined his family's lives, and yet he still keeps right on doing it without any care about the affects this may have on his child and his child's future. It won't be easy for his kid to live down the fact that his big name celebrity mother and father are both convicted drug addicts.

If my kid were doing drugs, and I could clearly see that it was ruining his/her life, and the lives of the people around him/her, there would a lot of tough lovin' from me. And if gets to the point where he/she has to do hard time to finally get it through their thick skull, then so be it. Of course, no parent WANTS to see their kid go to jail, but I sure it came to a point where he felt he had no choice. A parent who doesn't care is a parent who does nothing.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

to pretend there is no problem when faced with reality frankly, beggars belief.

How bad of a drug problem does the son have? That's right, you have no idea. You are just assuming whatever. To the anti-drug zealots in Japan and elsewhere, any use at all of illegal drugs is a "problem". And, regardless of whatever problem the son may or may not have, sending him to jail is not the best method of helping him, imo, as I've already stated. Also, feel free to use your own words instead of just reusing mine, mmmkay?

@Mirai Hayashi

Semantic nit-picking, a whole lot of assumptions on your part, and a misguided belief in the benefit of tough love.

Wait, you don't actually believe jail time has rehabilitative effects, do you? There are mountains of research that say otherwise. Sorry, I had assumed it was common knowledge that incarceration has basically zero rehabilitative benefit. In fact, it usually makes people more criminally inclined. In the case of illegal use of drugs, which would be best treated as a medical problem, not a criminal one, jail time is obviously not a good way to deal with it.

This is all besides my personal feelings of deep disgust at the father informing on the son.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Stranger_in_a_Strange_Land

How bad of a drug problem does the son have? That's right, you have no idea. You are just assuming whatever.

Funny as are you yet you are using your zero facts to slam this father. Obviously the guy has a drug issue and it has been going on for a couple of years. As witnessed by his arrest a few years back. So that is a fact that is undeniable. Its not like he has just started and the dad dobbed him in.

To the anti-drug zealots in Japan and elsewhere, any use at all of illegal drugs is a "problem". And, regardless of whatever problem the son may or may not have, sending him to jail is not the best method of helping him, imo, as I've already stated.

Thats fine, yes drugs are a problem and this is the course of action the dad chose to take. It would not be an easy choice but it was his choice. Now you are obviously pro drugs or just trolling for a bite, but each to their own. The facts are he has a drug problem, he used his parents house to get illegal drugs delivered too, which could have landed the parents in jail. And the dad made a call and dobbed him in. I say good on the dad.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Prison does not rehabillitate drug addicts it only ensures they will come out with more crimminal contacts than they went in with, making it even harder for them to break the cycle, any one who wants to help a drug addict needs to get them into rehab and continue to love them, slamming them will alienate them even further.

Prison is the wrong place to treat someone with a disease believe me !

Do you send cancer patients to prison to get help?

The father has made a big mistake unknowingly and may regret it later if he realises that there is another way, or do some here think that the father was taking revenge on the son by calling the cops?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Anyone who thinks prison cures drug addiction needs to take a course in life skills.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

His father reported the delivery of the package to police, saying that his son had gone bad again, ............................ tough love. The dude is so fortunate to have such a great loving daddy

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@Cletus

Getting arrested could mean he only very rarely uses illegal drugs and is just very unlucky or it could mean that he uses them a lot, but that they don't negatively affect his life (except for the police) or it could mean that they have made it impossible to function on a daily basis. Saying it for the third time now, you have no idea how much of a problem he does or doesn't have. You assuming he has some terrible problem doesn't make it fact.

Something coming to your house in the mail does not equal jail time. Anyone could send anything to your house without your knowledge or permission. Sorry buddy, that was a bit too big of a stretch.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Stranger_in_a_strange_land... You can't choose which laws to obey. If we all did that society would fall apart. Civilised people obey the law, follow the rules and norms of society. Freedom of expression is to be encouraged, but not the right to abuse the law of the land.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@Suginamiguy: Must be pretty hard to turn your own child over to the police.

That is so true...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If we all did that society would fall apart.

I don't think it would.

Also, I think you are ignoring the fact that most everybody breaks some law or rule at some time in their lives. the world doesn't turn into chaos. Imo, it's a huge fallacy that more laws and rules makes a society safer or more civilized. Laws should be few and very basic. The more laws and rules you make the harder it is to live without breaking one.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

@ Thunderbird2

Many people choose which laws to obey. Many people simply do not agree on the same laws. And society has fallen apart.

I'm sure you know someone who: a.) Speeds on the highway. b.) Downloads and pirates. c.) Drinks alcohol underage or does a recreational drug such as marijuana

The higher-ups and government officials like to tell you what they "think" is good for you, but unfortunately many of those lawmakers are also behind in times and refuse to accept the world is changing.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Saying it for the third time now, you have no idea how much of a problem he does or doesn't have.

If you get busted multiple times, that's a big problem by anyone's definition -- whether or not the drugs themselves are adversely affecting your health and ability to live a productive life.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

How much of a drug problem does he have, if any? That's right. You don't know.

Please. I think I know. After getting arrested for drugs and being humiliated nationally for it, the man used a fake name to send drugs to his father's house. There is nothing to defend here. The man thought only about himself. At the least his drug problem made him numb to the pain and misery and the trouble he causes to those around him.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I don't think it would.

Ummm, yes it would. Why do you think we have laws? To prevent us becoming what we were before we had them.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Semantic nit-picking, a whole lot of assumptions on your part, and a misguided belief in the benefit of tough love.

Let's learn to use a word correctly if you don't want to be nitpicked.

So you don't think he disgraced his son, parents, and contributed to bringing negative light to his trophy celebrity wife? (although I still believe she had issues before she met him). And no, I don't believe that the prison system is there to rehabilitate. Its there to punish. Even though we don't agree with the law, the law is the law, and it must be followed. And as someone mentioned above, if you think the law is wrong or should be changed, then contact your representative and have them bring it up in a Japanese congressional hearing.

Breaking the law is wrong and the consequence is jail time, which he clearly deserves. Jail is there to also send a message to others that if you commit a crime, you do the time. Unfortunately, j-judges are way too lenient towards celebrities and celebrity families and now we are seeing the consequences of it from this man's continued defiance and thumbing of the nose at the law.

In the case of illegal use of drugs, which would be best treated as a medical problem, not a criminal one, jail time is obviously not a good way to deal with it.

I agree with you 100% on this, but unfortunately Japan has no such system in place, and until they do, or until Japan decides to legalize and regulate drug usage, this is the way it needs to be handled. If you don't like it then don't do drugs are write a letter to your representative. And I stand by my statement that his father did the right thing. Hopefully his son takes away the right lesson from this experience instead of continuing his current ways.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I'm sure you know someone who: a.) Speeds on the highway. b.) Downloads and pirates. c.) Drinks alcohol underage or does a recreational drug such as marijuana The higher-ups and government officials like to tell you what they "think" is good for you, but unfortunately many of those lawmakers are also behind in times and refuse to accept the world is changing.

Eve, I don't know any underage tipplers, and neither do I know any junkies or pot-heads. Drugs are outlawed for a reason... they can kill or impair a person's ability to reason. Whether you inject or smoke makes no difference. If you need a drug to cope with reality then I pity you.

We all know people who go over the speed limit on motorways, or download MP3s from sites - doesn't mean I agree with it.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I am totally with Stranger. He actually thinks while others just paint by the numbers that have been etched in by their upbringing.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

He actually thinks while others just paint by the numbers that have been etched in by their upbringing.

Baloney. Just because people expect people to follow laws does not mean they don't think or that they are robots. I have read you complaining plenty of times when people did not follow laws in the way you thought they should. It is funny how any story about drugs brings out people who suddenly become anarchists just because it would mean they could easily use drugs when they would be crying for laws and the police to protect them the minute something bad happened to them.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@Nessie

Sure, it's a problem. The problem being that people think they should be able to proscribe what another person can put into his/her body or not.

@Mirai Hayashi

I used the word correctly. He is conspiring with the police.

Even though we don't agree with the law, the law is the law, and it must be followed....Breaking the law is wrong

I don't agree with that kind of extremist thinking. Sometimes the law is wrong and breaking it is the right thing to do.

Really, who gets to say what's wrong? Society? Obviously, then, what's wrong changes from society to society, and morals are subjective. If morals are subjective, why does the society get to make those subjective judgments, and not the individual? And if the individual dares to decide what's right and wrong for himself, he is immediately demonized and set upon by the herd.

@Thunderbird

Drugs are outlawed for a reason... they can kill or impair a person's ability to reason. Whether you inject or smoke makes no difference. If you need a drug to cope with reality then I pity you.

Some drugs are outlawed, some aren't. Some can kill, some can't. Whether you inject, or smoke, or drink, or eat, etc... definitely does make a difference. There are many reasons for doing drugs, coping isn't a common one as far as I know. People take drugs for medical reasons, recreation, and religious reasons, for the most part. .

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Really, who gets to say what's wrong?

Really? Each country does. This country has laws deciding it is illegal. Don't like it? Work to change the laws, move to a different country where you can do what you want legally or go to jail here in Japan for breaking the law.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

He is conspiring with the police.

You used it incorrectly. The father is protecting his family. Why should he allow illegal drugs to be in his home if he does not want them there? Takaso had illegal drugs sent to his father's home. He is 44. If he is going to do something so stupid, at least be a man and do it at your own home. Why did he feel the need to get his family involved?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Each country does.

I did just say that, and then posed a question which you conveniently ignored. Completely pointless response.

And I used the word conspire correctly (Really, there is nothing more tedious than people who will nitpick word meanings because they don't have any better point to make.)

Google the word conspire and this comes up as the #2 meaning, "(of events or circumstances) Seem to be working together to bring about a particular result, typically to someone's detriment."

Seems like the father is working with the police to get the son arrested to his detriment, doesn't it?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

get them into rehab

You don't get people into rehab. They go if they want. Noriko accepted to go. The surfer doesn't seem interested. If the Dad didn't get him arrested, this time or later, he and his wife would end up in jail for having drug in their house, mailed to their house. It's not the son's house, it's the parents'.

He's ruined his life and ruined his family's lives,

Exactly. That he destroys himself is sad enough, but he is getting others into it.

The father has made a big mistake unknowingly and may regret it later if he realises that there is another way, or do some here think that the father was taking revenge on the son by calling the cops?

No. We live in real life. Most people think he did what he could. Obviously, you've never had to deal with an addict. You think it's easy like in celeb mags, that you take your addict to "rehab" and abracadabra, there is a cure. A relative is now 50, I think. I can't remember when he was normal. In the last 3 decades, he has been to "rehab" (= the lunatic ward) about 20 time. He has provoked 2 serious car accidents, and countless troubles his family doesn't even bother mentioning as for them, that's like the rain, they rejoice the days without. At least, he does not bring (=deal) the stuff. If he did, his mother, now a retired widow, would have to call the police too.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Please stop going around in circles, repeating yourself.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Cos, gambling, tobacco and alcohol cause a lot of human misery. If your son was an alcoholic and he had a bottle of whiskey delivered to your house, would you call the cops?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I don't think the father is a dick for turning in his 44 year old son. I f he does know right from wrong by 44 maybe jail time is the best answer for him.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

If your son was an alcoholic and he had a bottle of whiskey delivered to your house, would you call the cops?

What a strange analogy! Alcohol is NOT (yet) illegal in Japan...

0 ( +2 / -2 )

If your son was an alcoholic and he had a bottle of whiskey delivered to your house, would you call the cops?

If that was illegal in the country, and I risked jail for owning the bottle ? Certainly. Otherwise, no, I could send it back. The problem is if you "cover" something illegal, you are an accomplice. There is a 80 yr old granny in my town, she went 2 years to jail (should have been 10 if she had not been aged and sick) because her grand-sons were stocking dope in her house, and she knew. I guess she didn't know how much, she never went to check. That was really a lot. That has not helped the youth as they took 10 years of slammer anyway. That only made things worse for her. If my son (any relative/friend), even not an addict, was hiding stolen goods, "fake" cigarettes, pedophile videos, etc, in my garage, I'd have to call the cops too. Maybe the first time, I'd give him 2 hours to clean the mess. That also depends if the son is 14 or 40. It's possible I'd take the risk to cover someone involved in some "political crime" or some unfair prosecution, but common drug dealing, stealing, illegal gambling in my property, etc, no, I wouldn't cover. I don't want to go to jail for something so ridiculous. That's not a cause to fight for. Takaso, that's not the first time as we have seen a few years ago. He has a drug problem. He could be just that. But no, he is also an irresponsible idiot. He was keeping the dope in the house where his kid lived, in his socks (underwear ?) for a family walk, he caused his wife to get to the courts, now his parents... I couldn't live with someone like that. If that's OK for you, send him a mail as when he leaves jails, he'll need a place to stay and he can be your room mate. Then you'll tell us what you do with the "parcels".

1 ( +3 / -2 )

What a strange analogy! Alcohol is NOT (yet) illegal in Japan.

Alcohol can be addictive and can cause many personal and societal problems. Drugs can be addictive and cause many personal and societal problems.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Alcohol is not relevant to this discussion.

If that was illegal in the country, and I risked jail for owning the bottle ? Certainly.

Then you are more interested in saving yourself than saving your son.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Not sure why this man didn't wrap up his act and try to humbly work in his pa's outdoor sporting goods store.

BTW, what exactly is this Alpha-Methyltryptamine?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Seems like the father is working with the police to get the son arrested to his detriment, doesn't it?

No. The father contacted the police when he find something illegal in his home. There was no working together. The father was a victim of a crime, by his son, but a victim nonetheless. Takaso is not a child. Why is he involving other people in his crimes? Why is he involving his family in his crimes? The father probably did the best thing for his son that was possible under the circumstances. I would think letting his son continue down the path to his own physical destruction is working much more toward his son's detriment, isn't it?

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He actually thinks while others just paint by the numbers that have been etched in by their upbringing.

Mr. Irony strikes again. Aren't you the same poster who wrote that he is so afraid of Japanese drink driving laws that you no longer have any alcohol? So, you paint by the numbers with alcohol, but you claim to actually think (seemingly not care about the laws) when it comes to illegal drugs? Somehow I really doubt that.

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And I used the word conspire correctly (Really, there is nothing more tedious than people who will nitpick word meanings because they don't have any better point to make.)

No you didn't. You have the definition right there and you're still using the word out of context. The father DIDN'T sit down with the police and premeditate a plan to get his son addicted to drugs just have him arrested, and put into jail. THAT would be a conspiracy. He merely reported a crime being committed by his son, recognized that he no longer has control of the situation, and sought help by the police. That's is not a conspiracy, its what every parent SHOULD do.

I don't agree with that kind of extremist thinking. Sometimes the law is wrong and breaking it is the right thing to do.

What's extreme here? If following the law is being an extreme, then the majority of our society are full of extremists. It is those who think they are above the law or who think the laws don't apply to them who are the REAL extremists. Where I come from, these people are called "criminals"....might want to google that word too.

Really, who gets to say what's wrong? Society?

Yes....its called voting...we vote for our legislators, who then create and vote for the laws. This whole thing is called a "government"...might want to look that up too.

Obviously, then, what's wrong changes from society to society, and morals are subjective. If morals are subjective, why does the society get to make those subjective judgments, and not the individual? And if the individual dares to decide what's right and wrong for himself, he is immediately demonized and set upon by the herd.

Because we live in a society where we have laws that must be followed for the overall good of society as a whole. We cannot make up our own laws because that would be the very definition of an anarchy which is not the type of society we live in. Sakai and Sakai's husband broke the law which carries a set penalty with it, and so they need to penalized. That's the way society works, and if you cannot deal with it, then you need to either try to change the laws that you believe to be flawed, or find a place where there is no such law in place. But until then, it is your duty as a citizen of this society to obey what's out there.

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Mirai,

You spelled it out quite well. Great post.

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@Eve Aphayboun

Downloading and pirates? People sometimes become pirates? shiver me timbers! Japan is very strict when it comes to drugs, surfboy knew this, so he's got no-one to blame but himself.

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Where do all these stimulants in Japan come from ?

Must be quite a few factories around eh?

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No you didn't. You have the definition right there and you're still using the word out of context. The father DIDN'T sit down with the police and premeditate a plan to get his son addicted to drugs just have him arrested, and put into jail. THAT would be a conspiracy. He merely reported a crime being committed by his son, recognized that he no longer has control of the situation, and sought help by the police. That's is not a conspiracy, its what every parent SHOULD do.

Yes, I did. The father called the police and informed on his son. That is working with the police to the detriment to the detriment of his son. There doesn't need to be a conspiracy per se, in order to use the word conspire. That is where you are making your mistake.

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The good part is his father.

I find it sad that in Japan they have to report their kids to the police for stimulant possession. In any other country a concerned parent would call a drug rehab clinic and try to help their child get clean. Here the person gets thrown in jail, and when they are released are expected to be reformed.

Instead of throwing these people into jail, they should be sentenced to professional rehab, not some BS "media image rehabilitation campaign" - whatever the hell that means. Call this man a loser all you like, but it is society that is failing him by refusing to help him with his addiction.

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Readers, you are still going around in circles. Posts that are repetitive will be removed.

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Call this man a loser all you like, but it is society that is failing him by refusing to help him with his addiction.

LOL and roll on the floor...It certainly does bugger the mind to the depths of denial people will go to avoid personal responsibility and accountability. Drug addicts, alcoholics, and perverts now hide behind the PC BS that their habits are a “disease”. The stark truth is that these people are lacking in sufficient personal fortitude and character to function within the social norm. Patting them on the head and sending them off to a two week retread course is not the answer, statistics prove that 88.9% will be repeat offenders within the first year. It is also a fact that of the other 11%, 6% will repeat offend within two years. The remaining 5% will stay clean….. which, by the way is the same rate as those who do not receive “professional” help. We have lost the whole point of imprisonment, prison should be a place of punishment, not a place to watch TV and workout until you do your reduced sentence that you had to serve because some conservative jerk passed a law saying that all of every sentence could not be suspended .

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Stranger,

Going to prison could be the best thing that could ever happen to him. It might, just might, give him a chance to get the monkey off his back. If he goes to prison, he will have no choice but to go cold turkey.

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First of all, we aren't talking about some 13 year old kid here. We are talking about a 44 year old adult with a son and with adult responsibilities. It would be difficult for any parent to call the police on their own kids, so I don't think the decision to call the police was taken lightly, on a whim, nor was it premeditated as some person might suggest, but this guy definitely has it coming to him. This is his third arrest and so it has been going on for awhile now. I can at least credit Sakai for trying to seek help and changing herself around, but this guy isn't even trying, which tells me that he will do it again. That would disappoint any parent, and cause them to seek help in some form. Was calling the police appropriate? Given the type of society and culture Japan is, I would say yes. In older to quit drugs, the user has to want to quit, and I doubt that he wants to, otherwise he would have sought help 3 years ago when everything came to a point for his wife. Hard time will probably do him some good.

There doesn't need to be a conspiracy per se, in order to use the word conspire. That is where you are making your mistake.

Mods: I need to address this one last time and then I will leave it alone...promise!

In order for this to be a conspiracy, or to be able to say that the father "conspired" to put his son in jail with the police, there has to be a premeditated motive, intent, for the father or police (to either to defame him, benefit from this situation, cause metal or physical harm, or just because he just wanted to see his own son behind bars) -which is a ridiculous and unfounded theory.

There is no visible premeditation or intent, hence there is no conspiracy. Its just a case of a concerned or fed up father who called the police on his drug addicted son -he didn't plan or conspire or "work with" the police....you're reading way too much into this.

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Drugs should be legal. What's the big deal?

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His father reported the delivery of the package to police, saying that his son had gone bad again, TV Asahi reported.

Geez- thanks a lot Dad! Getting the deadbeat into a decent rehab program would have been the best bet, not grassing him up. The irony is this "surfer dude" will now likely have access to a galaxy of drugs in the slammer - at grossly inflated prices of course!

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