crime

Oita woman arrested over death of 7-year-old son

18 Comments

Police in Oita have arrested a 40-year-old woman over the death of her 7-year-old son.

According to police, the woman, identified as Noriko Okada, killed her son Koki sometime between midnight and 2 a.m. on Friday. NTV reported that Okada's husband called 119, saying that Koki was unconscious and bleeding from the mouth.

When an ambulance arrived, Koki was in a state of cardiopulmonary arrest. He was confirmed dead shortly after at a hospital.

Police said there were strangulation marks on the boy's neck and that Okada had admitted to killing her son, but has so far given no motive.

Okada and her husband have two other children -- a daughter, 17, and a son, 6.

Police said Okada had been institutionalized several years ago and that her family reported that her behavior had started becoming erratic about two months ago, according to NTV.

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18 Comments
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Again!?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

It is disturbing, but lets not forget it was once considered necessary to kill a child that was too much trouble in various cultures including Japan up to the 20th century. "mabiki" (間引き, literally 'weeding out an overcrowded garden') could be considered an option in the minds of some desperate Japanese parents, but really who knows the motivation, the Japanese media never seems to reveal such things.

-9 ( +6 / -15 )

Another unhinged nut case, these parents who are diagnosed with mental health issues should not be allowed to live with their kids, this all too often is the result , RIP Koki.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Ok, that's five in seven days! Enough already! The Japanese health ministry needs to recognize there is a huge problem with mental and emotional stability in japan and do something about it!

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Sorry, but this evil crazy woman needs to HANG! Give her the death penalty ASAP!

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

kaiymachi: agree more and more kids are getting killed by the hands of those who brought them into this world the problem is not the child or the parents Its The System Japan needs to do more to identify these at risk children and get them some help this includes the parents too!

Are they or are the police, hospitals and institutions dealing with children and families just doing a better job of spotting abuse and murder? Are we just reading about these cases more because we have access to 24/7 news? Are these cases just being reported more because the attitude about this kind of thing has changed? I agree with the rest of your post but am always a bit suspicious about suggestions that the world has become more violent.

Here are a couple of interesting articles refuting that very notion.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/22/world-less-violent-stats_n_1026723.html http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424053111904106704576583203589408180

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Why do the parents of the mother not see this coming and then do nothing, except say she was under stress, and then wonder why she did it?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Kids don't ave a chance to live anymore with these crazies on the loose.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Kids don't ave a chance to live anymore with these crazies on the loose.

Tens of millions of living children in this country compared to a few murdered ones would seem to make that statement incorrect.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Forty year old mother. Where I come from, crimes like this are almost always associated with young mothers living in poverty.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Tessa: Yes, that is the "norm" when it comes to crimes like this, though there are a couple of posters who'd like you to believe that having a child after 35 or 40 is the cause of all the world's woes.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Strangerland

This isn't a literal statement or course. It just seems that with all these stories of "stress out" parent's killing their own kids, and kids committing suicide because of bullying etc., kids don't have a chance at living anymore. Japan is an aging society, so it should promote a better living environment for kids to grow up in.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

it should promote a better living environment for kids to grow up in.

I agree fully. But there are plenty of kids having good lives, enjoying school, and enjoying time with their families. What you read on the news is a small subset of what is actually going on in the real world, and the most extremely negative subset at that. Just because you read something more, doesn't mean it's actually happening more.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

So only I want her to hang??

-6 ( +2 / -7 )

Not everyone is hysteric like you.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Ebulda, you seem to want to execute almost every criminal.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

She had previously been institutionalised. Hanging someone who clearly has psychological problems solves nothing.

The authorities need to look at how she was treated, what follow-up care she received (if any) and make sure vulnerable/ potentially dangerous people are not put in this position. Mental healthcare in Japan is not given anything near the attention it requires.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Police said Okada had been institutionalized several years ago and that her family reported that her behavior had started becoming erratic about two months ago, according to NTV.

WTH is wrong with the system in Japan ??? What does "institutionalized" stands for in Japan ?? I sure know it means "mentally challenge person" in my country!! Let me get this...although the government has her REGISTERED as a potential psycho, the system simply releases her back into society without legally consenting and evaluating weather or not she is fit to move on with her family !? Why do I get the goose-bump feeling the father/husband had something to do with her release, as in... "We want her back, Social Case Worker. She is truly missed and I will take responsibility for her actions." It just doesn't add up. RIP little boy !!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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