crime

Osaka to keep register of released child sex offenders

40 Comments

Osaka is to become the first prefecture to keep a register of the addresses of convicted child sex offenders after they are released from prison.

The Osaka prefectural assembly on Friday passed an ordinance which will go into effect from Oct 1.

Those convicted of sex crimes involving minors will be required to register their contact details with the authorities for up to five years following their release from prison. Failure to do so will incur a penalty of 50,000 yen, TBS reported.

Members of the main political parties voted in favor of the regulation, with the execption of the Japan Communist Party.

The Osaka government says the ordinance is aimed at supporting ex-convicts' reintegration into society, and to help reduce the number of sex crimes against children, including the production of pornography involving minors.

© Japan Today

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

40 Comments
Login to comment

50,000yen for failure to comply is a joke, should be recalled to prison if they fail to register, infact these child molesters should not be allowed out of prison to begin with.

8 ( +14 / -6 )

" Failure to do so will incur a penalty of 50,000 yen, TBS reported."

You get more for a drunk driving charge, if the police bother to be on duty.

When are people going to get serious about this kind of thing? I'm tired of hearing about the lack of fines and punishment because it would 'not be popular' amongst voters. Good on Osaka to take a baby step here, but that's what it is -- a baby step.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

When are people going to get serious about this kind of thing?

Maybe when it gets to be a serious problem in Japan?

This imported idea won't make Japan safer. What I see is that everyone using this idea is far worse off than Japan. And no surprise since you treat people like criminals even after they serve their time, and lo and behold, they feel like criminals and act like criminals. This may well push recividism rates up as well as mar justice and freedom. A lose/lose in my book, but a win/win for some I guess, especially those who stand to profit or have job security from crimes like these.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Failure to do so will incur a penalty of 50,000 yen, TBS reported.

please add one more zero (atleast) and make it respectable figure Y500,000.-

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

I think they should do this for all criminals, since recidivism tends to peak within 3 years. No need to single out child sex offenders when rapists, murderers and other violent criminals go unpoliced, apply it to all released crimnals.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

please add one more zero (atleast) and make it respectable figure Y500,000.-

Yeah, best to drive child sex offenders into poverty. That will keep them from reoffending for sure! It certainly won't make them resort to something like murder if they go for a next time.

When in doubt, always up the ante! Japan is so dangerous because they just don't realize that!

Sarcasm off.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

ExportExpertMAR. 24, 2012 - 04:15PM JST 50,000yen for failure to comply is a joke, should be recalled to prison if they fail to register, infact these child molesters should not be allowed out of prison to begin with.

Absolutely agree with you totally! It sure is a joke.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

They aren't required already?!?! God this country really doesn't seem to care about the welfare of the kids here.

And yes, 50,000 is a yet. Make it mandatory. Failure to do so means probation.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Seavey: "This imported idea won't make Japan safer."

No kidding! An 'imported idea' of safety! One thing is of sure, it won't keep the safety of denial alive and well, which seems to have done favourably here for quite some time.

"What I see is that everyone using this idea is far worse off than Japan"

I'm far worse than Japan? How does that work?

"And no surprise since you treat people like criminals even after they serve their time, and lo and behold, they feel like criminals and act like criminals."

Name when I serve people as criminals after they serve their time. I know you're upset I don't agree with you minimizing certain American troops murderous rages, but go ahead and back up what you've just stated. Oh, and just in case you are worried, I won't be holding my breath.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

5 maan? Are they serious!!! They should throw them back in the pen for failing to register. It is not unlike breaking parole.

My first thought about this registry was, will this include child pornography, but then I realized, this is Japan and it is not illegal. Go figure!

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Disillusioned: "My first thought about this registry was, will this include child pornography, but then I realized, this is Japan and it is not illegal. Go figure!"

If they were actually serious about it they'd have to change the laws of what constitutes a child and adult, and shut down magazines like Weekly Jump, which peddle little girls in bikinis. It's simply not going to happen, as you and I know, but Seavey denies.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

How about getting serious about child rapists and imposing a mandatory 10 year jail sentence if they fail to register? 5-man will deter absolutely none of these evil grubs.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

5 maan? Are they serious!!!

gaman ("enduring the seemingly unbearable with patience and dignity" defined by Wikipedia) :(

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Only today watching 'Hugo' with my kids, my 10 year old boy went to pee half way through the film. I watched him walk there and almost immediately a freaky Japanese man followed him. So of course I followed him. Went into the loo and he was standing next to my son among many empty latrines.

Coincidence or am I just looking out for my kids?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Good on Osaka to take a baby step here, but that's what it is -- a baby step.

@Smithinjapan...C'mon man...'baby steps'...that's in poor taste ;)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Well SmithinJapan, the last part of your post certainly explained the knee-jerk naysaying of the first part. But I think you have me confused with someone else, or possibly your Smithinjapan account confused with another.

I'm far worse than Japan? How does that work?

Are you a country with a sex offender registry? Gee, I have never conversed with a country before!

but go ahead and back up what you've just stated.

You want me to back up the idea that people on a sex offender registry are made to feel like they are still criminals even after serving their time? That is quite a task, and not something anyone can prove in concrete terms. But here: http://www.deseretnews.com/article/695262646/Secret-shame-Keeping-watch--Sex-offenders-face-lots-of-supervision.html?pg=6

Several experts interviewed for this story urged caution about placing so many limits on sex offenders that they can't operate or function in society.

This is the beginning to doing that. And as it fails, more restrictions are added. More failure, more restrictions. The people always get locked into the idea of more is better. But its not. Law enforcement and the companies that serve them, love the cycle, because it equals money.

One thing is of sure, it won't keep the safety of denial alive and well,

Your turn to back that up.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

And Japan would say it's invasion of privacy!

Jpop idols are free though, haha.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@smithinjapan

....."and shut down magazines like Weekly Jump, which peddle little girls in bikinis. It's simply not going to happen, as you and I know"...why cause this is jjjjjjjjjland...

and don't forget those sick azz manga books...peddling the little j-girls too...and sick punk azz fantasies....and not too mention how they depict "the gaigin underdogs"....

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Coincidence or am I just looking out for my kids?

I'd say you were looking out for your kids.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

and don't forget those sick azz manga books

Its a lot harder to find them in places not as safe for kids as Japan. Coincidence? I don't think so. Its not Japan that should emulate others. Its others that should emulate Japan. But pride precludes that.

On this score and many others, I feel safer raising my child in Japan. The last thing I want is ideas that have made everywhere else less safe.

and sick punk azz fantasies

Cracking down on fantasies never made a safer country.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

While we're at it can with do something about the porn at kid's eye level in shops?!?! Top shelf with a cover please!

Movie story is creepy. I would be having a chat with the son about creepy older men.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Members of the main political parties voted in favor of the regulation, with the execption of the Japan Communist Party. Hehehehe... maybe there are many pedophiles and sex offenders belonging to the communist party. Good move by JGovt but the fine is too low. Make it 50man ¥ for sure they will register and if not put them back in jail... hehehe

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Failure to do so will incur a penalty of 50,000 yen

How will the police find them to collect the money?!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Members of the main political parties voted in favor of the regulation, with the execption of the Japan Communist Party. Hehehehe... maybe there are many pedophiles and sex offenders belonging to the communist party. Good move by JGovt but the fine is too low. Make it 50man ¥ for sure they will register and if not put them back in jail... hehehe

The JCP opposed this mainly because it would --and may-- violate Japan's Constitution.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I'm assuming that this is only a start hopefully soon Japan will make public the where abouts of all sex offenders.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

tmarie, Japan does not have to imitate the USA. All of their laws have prevented nothing. Except make life a living hell for released "sex offenders". The police having a list is one thing, the general public another.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

@Sherman - so sorry to hear that. The missus and I always make sure someone is accompanying our boys when they are out. Had a neighbor's 11 year old girl flashed by a perv right around the corner of our home. Dude had fled before I could see who it was. Police show up, look around, and leave as if nothing happened. Very sad.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Yuri, life should be a living hell for kiddie fiddlers.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Jpop idols would say it's invasion of privacy!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

tmarie, I believe in redemption and once they have done their time should be able to rejoin society.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

life should be a living hell for kiddie fiddlers.

Oh, absolutely. The more agitated we make kiddie fiddlers, the safer for the kids. Agitation is the name of the game, because agitated people always keep themselves in check, and never lash out even more than before.

And forgiveness and second chances? Who needs 'em! Just make life a living hell for kiddie fiddlers and the problem will heal itself.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Congratulations Osaka for cluing onto an idea which works well in most civilized countries. Next step... PREVENTION! Try banning any references to children in the adult industry and those rape manga magazines. Seriously... IT'S PLAIN WRONG!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Never ceases to amaze me how foreigners come to Japan and demand change. What they do in America just does not work. What you demand is not going to happen.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

So after 5 years they are cured?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

YuriOtaniMar. 26, 2012 - 11:01AM JST

Never ceases to amaze me how foreigners come to Japan and demand change. What they do in America just does not work. What you demand is not going to happen.

We demand changes because it works! If there is something wrong or dangerous in a community it ought to be changed. Sometimes the government is too busy to notice which is when the public steps in to make the authorities aware of the problem. In my opinion more people should stand up and fight for what is right in Japan. I'm sure if there was a blog of some sort for gaijin to make note of things which could possibly be changed in Japan to make it a better country ( things which Japanese people are possibly un aware of unless they have lived over seas), then I think the blog would fill up pretty quickly with some great and some what obvious ideas. Of course the same goes for our countries too... we should adapt great ideas from other countries too. Many (countries) do to some degree.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Back on topic please.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yuri, have you ever thought, just for a minute that this isn't about the US and about Osaka and the children there?

Redemption? Do you think justice is served to those poor kids that suffer the rest of their lives because of these people? The LEAST society can do is make sure of their whereabouts and try and protect other kids from the same thing happening. Asking them to register their residence isn't any more of a hardship than what foreigners have to deal with in Japan. In fact, it is easier. Five years, only have to deal with notices if they relocate. Seems pretty fair considering what some of us on there have to deal with with regards to cards, city hall...

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Obviously, sex crimes against children is an emotive subject, but we have to be careful not to let our emotions cloud what may be the best way to deal with the situation. Apparently, there is no statistical research that shows keeping close tags on released offenders is effective in reducing recidivism. Many people cannot get over the gut desire for a hard line to be taken with all criminals of this ilk and I've got to admit it's difficult at times not to cave in to the seeming justification of an "eye-for-eye" and that these people should be hounded over a cliff no matter how long they serve in prison. However, I found the following more measured views in a Wall Street Journal blog: The conventional wisdom on sex-crime recidivism, coupled with high-profile sex crimes against children, has helped spur the spate of registry and neighbor-notification laws, even before they could be properly studied for their impact on recidivism rates. Several researchers, (one of whom includes a certain Dr. Doren), say that residency-restriction laws may be counterproductive. Such a constraint “drives them out of their community, and leads to a lack of stability,” said Karen J. Terry, a criminologist at John Jay College in New York. “Those are some of the underlying conditions that caused them to abuse in the first place.” The existing research raises tough questions about the relative danger child molesters pose to society. Their likelihood of being convicted for a crime after release is much lower than average for all criminals released from prison, and even for all sex offenders, at least in the short term, as measured by a Bureau of Justice Statistics study and others. Yet their crimes, when they do repeat child abuse, are unusually harmful, and their victims particularly vulnerable. Does that justify the closer monitoring of child molesters after release, compared with other criminals? Dr. Doren isn’t sure, pointing out, for example, that convicted rapists are more likely to re-offend in the years immediately after release, and more likely to commit other violent crimes. “If we’re concerned about violence generically, it’s rapists we should be concerned about” in the short term, he said.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Where does it state the public has access to this info?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

cl400, please keep your change out of Japan. It just does not work. I can agree with police know their address but it stops there. Soon there will be calls that the sex offenders can not live within a certain distance of a school, playground or bus stop. Then there will be calls to keep them in prison for life, even though they were not sentenced for life. When the police gather this evidence it needs to be kept secure or risk what is happening to released sex offenders in the USA. It is my understanding they are often beat up or murdered. A wink wink nod nod by the police and it is on to the next. My big worry is this will allow more laws against released sex offenders.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites