crime

Patient in Niigata hospital psychiatric ward kills another patient

12 Comments

Police in Niigata said Sunday that a male patient in a psychiatric ward in a hospital killed another male patient on Saturday night.

According to police, the 50-year-old suspect, who hasn't been identified, was admitted to the two-bed ward at Nittsu Shinai hospital earlier Saturday, NTV reported.

Police said that at around 7 p.m., the suspect strangled 69-year-old Satoru Yoshizawa who was in the other bed. Neither patient had restraints, police said.

A male orderly discovered Yoshizawa's lifeless body on the floor when he made his rounds at 8 p.m., police said.

The suspect was quoted by police as saying Yoshizawa's coughing annoyed him and they argued about it. When Yoshizawa wouldn't stop coughing, the suspect said he strangled him with his hands, police said.

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12 Comments
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Stupid .. sick

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Poor ..

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God have mercy. ;)

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Everybody needs a proper private room, for normal and especially psychologically ill people. Otherwise this would not have happened...

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Shows up how pathetically useless psychiatric "treatment" is.

This is not an isolated case.

The number of suicides committed while undergoing "treatment" is another shocking statistic.

Psychiatrists basically haven't a clue what they are doing.

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BertieWoosterJul. 07, 2014 - 07:36AM JST Shows up how pathetically useless psychiatric "treatment" is.

I think you're generalizing a bit here... Yes, whoever put an undiagnosed, potentially violent, patient in the same room as another patient, and without video monitoring or surveillance... they were an utter idiot and should be fired.

That being said, this sort of idiocy is not uncommon in Japan, both in hospitals and in the police force, where suspected mentally ill patients will be dumped in with drunk people sleeping off a bender.

This is not an isolated case. The number of suicides committed while undergoing "treatment" is another shocking statistic. Psychiatrists basically haven't a clue what they are doing.

And how many lives have been saved by psychiatric treatment? Even regular GPs dealing with minor cases have occasional deaths. I'm not excusing the deaths, but sometimes it is unavoidable.

In this case however I must agree that these particular medical personnel deserve to be fired. They have no idea of proper protocol.

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Shows up how pathetically useless psychiatric "treatment" is.

The suspect was admitted to the hospital -- an administrative function, not a psychiatric one -- and wasn't being observed. The lack of observation points to insufficient treatment.

I notice you didn't offer a better alternative to psychiatric treatment for the mentally ill.

Psychiatrists basically haven't a clue what they are doing.

Do you, Bertie?

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@BertieWooster - Japanese psychiatrists basically haven't a clue what they are doing.

There, fixed it for you!

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bilderberg_2015,

You're certainly right about Japanese psychiatrists.

However, the death/suicide statistics of people undergoing psychiatric "treatment" are pretty high anywhere.

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BertieWoosterJul. 07, 2014 - 05:38PM JST However, the death/suicide statistics of people undergoing psychiatric "treatment" are pretty high anywhere.

And the death rates of people undergoing cancer "treatment" are pretty high too. Does this mean that cancer treatments are ineffective or that oncologists don't know what they're doing? Hell no, it means they're dealing with very, very sick people who would definitely die without the treatment.

The same goes for psychiatrists. A very large chunk of patients are seriously ill and are predisposed to suicidal behaviour. Starting from that biased sample (i.e. people most likely to commit suicide) and pointing out that a larger than average number of them commit suicide as evidence that psychiatrists don't know what they're doing... well, it should appear in a logic textbook under the heading of "Top example of illogical thinking".

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Is it typical for psychiatric patients to share rooms? Are these wards overcrowded, perhaps? Or is the cost of a private room prohibitively high? I know nothing of psychiatry but I imagine it would be best for people to have private rooms.

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FouxdefaJul. 07, 2014 - 11:02PM JST Is it typical for psychiatric patients to share rooms? Are these wards overcrowded, perhaps? Or is the cost of a private room prohibitively high? I know nothing of psychiatry but I imagine it would be best for people to have private rooms.

Where I come from? No. Typically patients have private rooms. However in Japan I've seen a number of facilities with public rooms, mostly because the psychiatric facilities are often over-crowded. This isn't a reflection of an unusually high number of cases though, it is a reflection of the poor state of psychiatric care in Japan, which is about 40 years behind other first world countries, and hasn't even made much progress into outpatient care for psychiatric patients.

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