crime

Police caution more than 10,000 in Tokyo for breaking new bicycle rules

67 Comments

Police in Tokyo said that more than 10,000 people have already been given warnings by police for breaking the city's newly implemented bicycle regulations.

On Friday, police visited the roughly 100 areas of the capital which have been designated "Bicycle Traffic Regulation Zones." Officers monitored rush hour bicycle traffic and cautioned commuters who were in violation of the new rules and regulations, Fuji TV reported.

According to police, over 10,000 cyclists throughout the capital have been cautioned for using cell phones and listening to earphones while riding, among other violations.

Tokyo police have also announced that they intend to enforce the rules during high traffic density periods in the morning and evening of the 10th day of every month, Fuji reported.

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67 Comments
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So silly. Mega-crimes underground, and the police focus on bicycles? Ridiculous. That's like a cancer patient getting treated for acne.

10 ( +19 / -10 )

Brilliant, so enforcement only comes one day and month and the rest of the time one is free to break the regulations unimpeded! Only in Japan...

9 ( +14 / -5 )

I'd like to see them confiscate the umbrellas many cyclists use in the rain. Those people are wobbling all over the place.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Crack down on illegal parking and the cyclists will be happy to stay on the road. But that will never happen.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

Too little too late? Simply put, too many people think that traffic laws don't apply to bikes but its never been enforced. Trying to introduce civility into decades of chaos is not going to happen overnight.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

So silly. Mega-crimes underground, and the police focus on bicycles? Ridiculous.

Right?! They can catch bicycles, so they stop them. The can't catch Bosozouku, so they ignore them.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Tokyo police have also announced that they intend to enforce the rules during high traffic density periods in the morning and evening of the 10th day of every month

What an odd thing to "announce".

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Bicycles should go with the rest of the road traffic, on the left.

If someone doesn't have the confidence to do this, they shouldn't be on a bicycle in the first place.

And Japan has to clean up its roads.

They are disgusting. There is no excuse for it.

Narrow roads just wide enough for one car, with electric poles projecting into them.

No addresses.

No street names and no house numbers.

Cars parked not only near, but actually ON pedestrian crossings.

Time to clean these up.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Typical actions of the police here, they really aren't interested in stopping the people who break the laws. And seem to be too lazy to do whats right.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Just the other day, while I was crossing the street, the pedestrian light turned green, so I started to walk across. Then suddenly, a bicycle zoomed past me, just missing me by inches. When I looked at the rider, he was holding something on one hand (looks like he's eating), and one hand on the bicycle.

Thing is, he was riding on the street, and ignored the red light for vehicles.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Some cyclists are idiots and should be punished.

3 ( +6 / -4 )

There really is no problem for a vehicle driver if the cyclist travels with the flow on the correct side of the road as they are supposed to. Other than that, cycling sensibly on the footpaths is much safer.

Spoken like a true car driver. This has been proven to be untrue. In addition, you're not allowed to cycle on the sidewalk.

Pedestrians want cyclists on the street; drivers want them on the sidewalk. How 'bout y'all figure it out and provide the appropriate infrastructure. Until then, I will blame stopped cars for making the roads dangerous. For the record, I think think cyclists who ride against traffic should be heavily fined. Ditto for taxis that make sudden stops and u-turns. Same for cars stopped on trunk roads.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Beware miscreants all: on the 9th, they're going after murderers, on the 8th, purse snatchers, on the 7th, people who take pencils home from work...

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Finally! but why the need to announce the date?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Incredibly, I got stopped for making a right turn on the right turn signal. I was told I have to wait for the next light, cross the street, then wait for the next light. Sheesh!

2 ( +5 / -3 )

The worst are the young mothers punching the cell phones while carrying kids front and back....

and also Teen ages...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The 10th. Entered into my calendar so those days I leave my headphones in my bag. The police... Useless.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Should hand out 15,000 Yen tickets instead of cautions then people will take note.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"Hmm... That law banning listening to music is really going to get me one of these days."

I don't really get the point of that law. Car and truck drivers are allowed to listen to the radio or music, and deaf people are allowed to cycle.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Listening to music through headphones or talking on a mobile phone is dangerous for either car users or cyclists. The police are right to enforce the law.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I wouldn't say as far as the Japanese being more mature than your average westerner, but I agree with nukeprotest 100% on the campaining thing.

Even the bicycles that fill up whatever space there are near the stations are warned what date they will be collected by the city. Anybody wanting it back, will need to pay some fee.

Some people just don't realize that some things are against the law, so people need to be educated. Of course there are people who know, but does it anyways...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Nessie

Pedestrians want cyclists on the street; drivers want them on the sidewalk. How 'bout y'all figure it out and provide the appropriate infrastructure.

Here in Nagoya, the local government has been working on this as we speak. Along Sakura Doori, where the road is 4 lanes wide, as well as a spacious sidewalk, there's an on-going construction for bicycle-exclusive lanes between the sidewalk and the road. There is even a provision for pedestrian traffic light for the bicycle lane.

This means that there will be less areas where cars can "temporarily" park along the road, and accidents between cyclists and pedestrians may be avoided.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

GW

did you go to school ?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Good for them. Catch those violaotors. I am tired of trying to teach people to stay on the right side of the road (right meaning left, BTW...).

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I wish they would enforce these laws more often, and definitely not JUST in Tokyo. Out here in the countryside of Yamanashi I have had 2 students end up in the hospital this school year because they were not paying attention while on their bikes and rode into the street while they didn't have the right of way.

One of them even went into a coma for a few weeks... and yet her friends are still out there talking on phones, carrying umbrellas and riding with no lights at night. What will it take to make them realize it isn't just illegal, but unsafe?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I don't really get the point of that law. Car and truck drivers are allowed to listen to the radio or music, and deaf people are allowed to cycle.

Not with headphones on they are not. If the music you want to listen to is coming from some other source than headphones then it wouldnt be a problem.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Around here, the 20th and 30th are enforcement days too, "zero no hi" they are called. Otherwise, you can do just about anything. I wish the cops would get tough on parents who dont strap their kids into car seats. That really bugs me. If I see one more granny sitting in the front passenger seat and holding a baby, I'll scream. Or a pack of kids roaming around the back of a moving station wagon....

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"narrow roads"

And what about buildings built within a few centimeters of these narrow roads or sidewalks!

And parked cars and trucks blocking the left lane everywhere!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Just fine wrong behaviour...i.e. dangerous ones. Riding at 5mph is in no way dangerous on sidewalks...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If safety is important, Tokyo should make the city more bicycle friendly. The J-goverment needs to create more safe lanes for bicycles. They need to develop an entirely separate travel system for bicycle use. It is well-used, healthful and safe. It would be great if Tokyo worked on such a system in its planning. Currently, bicycle use in Tokyo is inconvenient and dangerous but with long-term planning this could change. They can be stored easily and employers could easily provide shower areas for people bike commuting. The bicycle commuters can take advantage of the great outdoors in getting to work. Unfortunately, the city of Tokyo does not agree.

There are a large number of very difficult and dangerous areas for bicyclists in Tokyo, which is evidenced by the large number of fatalities on bicycles. The basic problem is that some areas are poorly and dangerously connected to congested road with very little thought given to bicycle transportation. They need to put in dividers, not just painted stripes so that bicycles have a large measure of safety. I would not be surprised if Japan ranks near the bottom of the nation in terms of monies invested in bicycle transportation per mile of road.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

That is why in japanese law they are classed the same as 50cc scooters, ie road members.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So rules will not be enforced at other times?

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Bluebris: I'm with you. When I visit Tokyo I see motorcycles and cars(including taxis) flagrantly violating traffic laws, sometimes doing things that just defy common sense(like driving on the sidewalk). How about somes enforcement sweeps for them also?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I,m yet to see any sign of cops enforcing the" no cell phone rule " for car drivers..I see so many of them talking and texting on their phones ( even right outside a koban with a useless cop standing outside ) and not once have I seen anyone stopped for it...completely ridiculous...but I guess trying to stop a car is much more mendokusai than a high school kid on a bicycle. .As for only enforcing this on the10th of each month thing - I guess its more enjoyable to drink coffee in a warm koban for the other 29 days of the month instead.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hide, it shud be about priorities not what ever is easiest, requires the least effort.

Now they blitz cyclists, incredibly lame, especially since they let it become a free for all for decades & NOW they want to enforce a few rules, waste of tax paid supposed resources

And the MORONS announce when they will enforce, reminds of all the companies where the tax office tells them in advance fo their "raids", LAME!

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Late last year, I got cautioned for riding my bicycle while using headphones on the street so I refrain from doing it anymore.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Hmm... That law banning listening to music is really going to get me one of these days.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

. . . while radiation spews and earthquakes loom.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Serrano, Incredibly, I got stopped for making a right turn on the right turn signal. I was told I have to wait for the next light, cross the street, then wait for the next light. Sheesh!

If it was a multi laned road, -- I can understand why you were stopped. Cycling on the outside lane on a busy Japanese road is quite a dangerous manoeuvre. Cyclists should only travel in the inside lane. If there was only one lane which went straight ahead and right, then I am sure there should be no problem.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

About the comments on the "10th day of every month", actually, this coincides with current the practice of the police force to stand by major intersections for vehicular and pedestrian monitoring.

Here in Nagoya, you can see the driver's change of driving manners and etiquette every 10th of the month ... that is, while they are passing through intersections teeming with cops.

I guess that on that day, starting next month, the cops would be monitoring cars, pedestrians and cyclists ... all at the same time. Talk about multi-tasking!

@wipeout

Car and truck drivers are allowed to listen to the radio or music, and deaf people are allowed to cycle.

Deaf people using hearing aids can drive, and vehicle drivers can listen to music, but not using earphones or headphones, and drivers caught using cellphones are usually flagged down by the police (very common on the 10th day of the month).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Tokyo police have also announced that they intend to enforce the rules during high traffic density periods in the morning and evening of the 10th day of every month, Fuji reported.

At any other times, have at it!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yes, yes... and I'm sure the people cautioned took it to heart. For the next month and a half until April they should have continuous commercials on TV, info on signboards and posters, and lectures on the new rules and the punishments for breaking them, then from April cease to 'caution' and simply start ENFORCING!

One more thing -- don't buckle to public pressure to rescind the laws because they are 'inconvenient' to mothers breaking a dozen laws. Safety should not be trumped by convenience or political points.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

This police action is not such a bad idea. I don't want to re-open the bad cycling debate, but there was a case shown on TV where a cyclist suddenly cut across the front of a truck, causing it to swerve. It then mounted the pavement and killed a couple of people. All in a matter of seconds.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I wish to thank so many of you for reminding me why I live in Japan. All these calls for hard swift punishment are the quite the opposite from the Japanese style of doing things.

Many rules just came into being and the Japanese authorities announced them. Now they have an awareness campaign where the police nicely inform people of infractions and get them on the right track. And yes, part of the awareness campaign involved telling everyone when it will happen. Taking people by surprise is not necessary for an awareness campaign.

Again, awareness campaign. Not a campaign to make people feel like total criminals. Not a campaign to fill the government coffers. Not a campaign to fill up the prisons. A campaign to promote awareness of the new rules and foster cooperation.

Japan is not perfect and in a few years I too will want stiffer penalties for some things. Already I disagree with some of the new rules. But for now, at least everyone is being given a chance to adjust, and that goes a long way to explaining why this society can be more gentle in general. What goes around comes around, so what do you get when your answer is to always crack the whip?

For every arrogant butthole rule breaker I have seen in Japan, I remember 10 more back home. Like I said, Japan is not perfect. But I sure find it preferable.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Look some of you have it right and others are way off base. 1 it is unsafe to ride with the flow of traffic. 2 rideing or walking with head phones in dangerous. But to have cops fighting tickets for eather is stupid (and this is a condition that can't be fixed). If a cycalist is going against the flow thay can see the car that vears out of its lane or if someone opens a car door suddenly the impact is lessned. And the sudden turn is away from the bicycle. You guys have to give up this doggmatic way of thinking and pay attention to what had been learned through out the world on bicycle saffty

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Nessie: "Pedestrians want cyclists on the street; drivers want them on the sidewalk. How 'bout y'all figure it out and provide the appropriate infrastructure. Until then, I will blame stopped cars for making the roads dangerous. For the record, I think think cyclists who ride against traffic should be heavily fined."

I agree with you about the fine and otherwise, particularly with the stopped and double parked cars. I can't count the number of times I have had to ride into oncoming traffic (or nearly) because someone was double parked in front of the convenience store or Izumiya, blocking what little of a bike lane there may be, because they are too lazy and/or cheap to use the parking available. The problem is that infrastructure has been modified for CARS, which took a priority over pedestrians and bicycle riders in the 70's and 80's. Roads that were already too narrow for two way traffic saw their 'sidewalks' eliminated for cars to drive on. Newer utility poles were put smack in the middle of the side of the road where people walk, etc. These days I see a lot of streets being altered to try and make wider sidewalks or even bike lanes (which are ignored and/or used by scooters!), but the fact of the matter is in most places there is just not enough space.

That said, while it's dangerous for both cyclists and drivers alike to have people riding on the street instead of the sidewalk it simply has to be done -- there are more than 2000 accidents a year involving cyclists hitting other cyclists on pedestrians on the sidewalks and every year a number of these result in deaths. I even disagree with the exception that seniors and children should be allowed to ride on the sidewalks that are less than three meters. On my way home from the station this even -- a 15 minute walk -- I counted more than 32 infringements by bicycle riders before I stopped counting, and that wasn't even counting those listening to music. Much like cars don't seem to care if a bicycle is coming down the street before they pull out on to it (giving the 'sumimasen' wave after nearly killing you, of course), a lot of cyclists will simply swerve across the street without looking, especially mothers with a couple of kids on their bikes (and we all recall the woman whose two young daughters died the other day as a result of her negligence), cross on reds, ride on the wrong side, etc.

Again, the police have to stop WARNING people and start charging them... soon!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Another useless article lacking crucial facts. What are the "other new rules"? I'd like to know!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Announcing the date is just like when you see patrol cars ambling along with the lights on but no siren. It's dumb because if gives all the dangerous drivers a heads up to drive carefully only at THAT time; we need them to be driving safely on a constant basis, which means keeping drivers on their toes by making them think that they could get stopped by the cops at ANY time.

Why are the police here too dumb to figure that one out?

I have to renew my licence here next week; I'm kinda looking forward to the "any questions?" part.

As for cyclists, the most dangerous thing for them to be doing is riding against traffic. People who do this in Japan NEVER get out of the way, or go around cyclists on the correct side of the road (even though it's far more difficult for them to check and maneuver around these idiots).

0 ( +1 / -1 )

If people had used common sense they would have known that it might not be a good idea to be typing out on an email whilst cycling through a busy street.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This morning, one young lady listening to he Ipod going the wrong way on the street pissed me off, blocked her and yelled at her a few minutes later some old geezer came flying around a blind curve a lightly smashed into my bike and he hit his balls but I was just fine, 2 close calls in just about 1 km distance of western Tokyo, so when will they start to enforce cycling rules in our part of Tokyo??

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Last week, riding correctly on the LEFT side of the road here in Tokyo a bastard bus driver from the SEIBU company almost killed me, the fool tried to pass me on a very NARROW street, but there was an ON COMING CAR so the idiot bus driver started to PULL RIGHT INTO MY SPACE, the HUGE bus against my little BICYLCE?? I chased the bus because I had forgotton my Iphone, but remembered the license plate number, time etc.and CALLED THE POLICE and told them they had to call the SEIBU bus company, so it is not just bicyles but these so called professional bus drivers that are also very stupid and DANGEROUS too!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

You can always rely on the J-cops to do the following:

1) Hit an easy target. Remember when this became a law, the first thing they did was stop and caution a teenaged girl? How brave.

2) Treat the whole thing as a ritual. On the appointed hour of the appointed day, be vigilant and profuse with thy cautions. And lo, at the setting of the sun were the cautions no more.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Drivers and transportation engineers alike need to realize that bicycles are neither pedestrians nor cars.

A recent opinion from nytimes commented rightly on several issues such as red lights here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/05/opinion/sunday/if-kant-were-a-new-york-cyclist.html?_r=3

The comment about dealing with stopped cars is spot on. If I want to be considerate and ride in the left lane, I'm constantly forced to merge right each time I pass these stopped cars. The traffic to my right doesn't care, and more importantly doesn't even notice that I am approaching a stopped car and am about to need to get over into the next lane. If I ride defensively and just stay in the second lane, the cars get frustrated as they think I'm slowing them down. They don't notice that 5 seconds later they're going to hit their brakes at the light and I'm going to pass them, but that's another issue. The left lane of the road is not a parking lot, and despite the technical legality that might permit this, it is a dangerous activity and causes congestion.

Furthermore, if you drive a car in traffic in Tokyo on a daily basis as a commuter, you are pig. This city has so much public transit, unless you are driving a commercial vehicle, you really have no excuse.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You can't listen to music while riding a bike? That's boring, while not allow people walking on the sidewalks to listen to it either.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

NessieFeb. 13, 2012 - 10:49AM JST Crack down on illegal parking and the cyclists will be happy to stay on the road. But that will never happen.

Depends what you mean by illegal parking. It is not illegal to stop at the side of the road providing there is a person in the vehicle. People in cars do have to pull over to the side of the road for many obvious reasons. As a driver in Japan, I have found that one of the worst cycling habits is to cycle against the traffic on the wrong side of the road. There really is no problem for a vehicle driver if the cyclist travels with the flow on the correct side of the road as they are supposed to. Other than that, cycling sensibly on the footpaths is much safer.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Bicycles are vehicles. Vehicles have no business on pedestrian sidewalks. The disparity in speed between pedestrians and bicycles is too great. Bicycles belong on the road. With the exception of "limited access highways", bicycles should have just as much right to be on the street/road as cars and trucks. That said, a bicycle on the street/road MUST obey all traffic laws the same as a car/truck would. This means driving on the left in Japan and treating the bicycle as a slow-moving vehicle - meaning the bike is on the FAR left. Car/Truck radios do not block outside noises like earbuds do and so earbuds are naturally going to be targets for enforcement.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

This morning after my own scary moments get to my job, a friend from Argentina had been trying to call my cellphone but I did not want to answer it because I was riding my bike to work and it can be dangerous, he tells me that the night before some idiot high school girl flew down a hill on her bicycle BREAKING HIS LEFT LEG, now he can not go to work and the police say it was HIS FAULT because he was on a SCOOTER but this idiot high school girl came flying out of no where with out lights and at night, WTF?? Not in Tokyo, buy down in Fujisawa, Kangawa ken.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Elbuda Mexicano wrote "blocked her and yelled at her"

Maybe next time you could just calmly tell her its illegal while reminding her that not being able to hear anything but ipod could get her killed?

Elbuda Mexicano wrote "the police say it was HIS FAULT because he was on a SCOOTER"

And people don't believe me when I say that in Japan they just blame the more powerful or larger vehicle and to hell with details. If your friend had not broken his leg and decided to just get out of there, knowing he would be blamed, he would have been charged with hit and run. I suspect many here would say it was unfair to him. But if he was in a car, nothing changes. But in that case, many here would curse him. And if she was injured? Then many would blame him squarely.

Its easy to say the Japanese authorities are nuts, but they are sure not the only ones! People who fly out from blind corners and ram others, or run right into the path of others are the ones to blame, even if they die in the process.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I know this is a bike topic but what you read and what you see happening are two different entities.

No music while riding a bike.? That's a bit extreme. Drivers can listen to music but people with light bikes cannot? The rich get to enjoy music but the poor who use bikes to save money cannot.

I realize that this is a bike topic but it just seems that at every turn Japan is turning itself into 1984. Go to work. No color, no creativity, no music. Just go to work.

If you want to listen to music then use the train and PAY!!!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@mitoguitarman

"Mega-crimes underground, and the police focus on bicycles"

So are you saying the police should ignore all the traffic violations until ALL the murders, rapes and other serious crimes have been solved ?

Great, since that day will never come, you are are hoping for a complete chaos and you will never get caught unless you commit serious crimes.

-2 ( +6 / -9 )

Comedy Central!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

derrall said: If a cycalist is going against the flow thay can see the car that vears out of its lane or if someone opens a car door suddenly the impact is lessned.

Bicyclists cannot see cars veer out of lanes from behind? And if travelling beside the car for a long period, then that cyclist is a fool. Impact might be lessened for hitting a door from the front of the car than the back, but on the other hand, a head on collision with a car means greater impact.

Bicycles travelling against the flow of traffic cause great confusion and anxiety for drivers that in itself defeats any benefit to be gained by it. But there is also the idea getting clipped by one of those side mirrors rushing by you. Or hitting a rut and careening right into the path of a car, whereas if you were going with the flow of traffic you would careeen away from the path of the car giving the driver more time to stop or swerve.

If a bicylist uses his or her neck to look back occaisionally, he or she can speed up to avoid troublesome cars. But if you are heading right toward them altering your speed won't help you. You are more often just locked into it even if you do see it coming.

Anytime I have tried riding against the flow of traffic its been a spooky experience. I ride defensively, always assuming I have not been seen because I probably haven't. Riding against the flow of traffic increases visibility, but also handicaps my options to take evasive action. But I have to admit, I don't ride granny cycles at granny speeds.. When I ride on the road I put the mountain bike in a higher gear and get up some speed.

All that said the rule for bikes to travel on the road only is stupid. Grannies belong on the sidewalk. Fit people traveling nearly as fast as cars belong on the road. Anyone in between needs to choose one or the other if there is no clear bike path.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Announcing the date is actually effective. It makes people pay attention on that day. And the day you betcha! The police will be out there again, so the law will be reinforced.

But cyclists are pretty far gone. They are breaking serious traffic laws. I think some will need to see the inside of a prison cell, for only a few months, in order to ensure they obey the laws.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Good for them. Even if it's only once in a while, it serves a purpose. And there's nothing to say they don't change the enforcement days now that it's been published. What could an offender possibly say? "But it's not the 10th of the month!!"? The obvious response would be, "Why would the date make any difference as to when a law is in effect?"

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

kaminarioyajiIt's dumb because if gives all the dangerous drivers a heads up to drive carefully only at THAT time;

In a land where so many criminals turn themselves in, it might be a more effective heads up than you want to believe. Remember, most drivers are Japanese, not westerners, and most may not need the constant threat of a boot up the backside to behave.

The goal of the police is much like the firemen who go around clanging bells in the winter time. The goal is to make people think and reflect on possible dangers. For mature adults it has an effect. Mature adults may only need a little tap on the shoulder from time to time. In this way the Japanese may be more mature than your average westerner.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Bicycles are OK on sidewalks as long as the bicycle riders ride slowly and yield to pedestrians. Bells should not be rung unless you've got a group of people walking in the same direction spread out over the entire sidewalk.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I'm buying a video camera. Maybe I can capture a high speed bicycle chase. Some cyclists know they can ditch any copper carrying an extra 10kg of weight on them. Can't wait to see the blogs.

"Some cop tried to catch me today during rush hour. He gave chase as we cut through the streets of congested Tokyo. Then the poor copper got hit by a taxi. Good thing for me he didn't get my license plate number".

Of course some of us won't be able to escape a cop that's in good shape. Don't be an oyaji cop. I can't hear you.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

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