crime

Police officer arrested for stealing 5 mil yen from 89-year-old man

15 Comments

A 25-year-old police officer was arrested Saturday on suspicion of stealing 5 million yen from the residence of an 89-year-old man in Kaizuka, Osaka Prefecture.

The officer, Takumi Deguchi, has admitted to stealing money from the elderly man’s house on two occasions, police said. He was quoted by police as saying he stole the money to pay back gambling debts, Sankei Shimbun reported.

According to Osaka prefectural police, Deguchi – who is stationed at a koban (police box) near the man’s residence -- and a senior officer first visited the man’s home on Jan 10 after he reported that his wallet was missing. Deguchi said that while they were searching the rooms, he found a large amount of cash in a box sitting on top of a chest of drawers. The senior officer advised the man to put his money in a bank.

However, Deguchi went back to the man’s home by himself later that same day, gained admittance on some pretext, and stole 2 million yen. On Jan 12, the victim reported the disappearance of his money to Deguchi at the koban.

After his arrest on Saturday, Deguchi told police that the 2 million yen he stole in January had not been enough to pay back his debts, so at around 4 p.m., on April 1, without authorization, he visited the elderly man again to see if he was OK. While he wasn’t looking, Deguchi stole 3 million yen.

The man consulted police the next day to report that his money had gone missing after he had been visited by a policeman. Deguchi was questioned by his senior officer and admitted to stealing the 3 million yen and also the 2 million yen in January.

© Japan Today

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15 Comments
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No surprise exercise

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Ahhhhh, J-cops. What would we do without them.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I wonder how that campaign to win the public trust back is going for them

5 ( +7 / -2 )

So much for 'protect and serve'.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Molestation a few days ago, and now this. The J-cops are going above and beyond this new fiscal year. Where's the J-cops/Crime section I've been calling for already? Seriously, what are the recruiting policies for police in this country? Sounds almost as bad as the American military.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

he stole the money to pay back gambling debts

Owed to the yakuza, by any chance? Osaka police, no surprise if that were the case....

0 ( +3 / -3 )

he stole the money to pay back gambling debts

... And the government wants to open casinos ! Pachinko addiction is bad enough.

Being a cop, he should be made an example of, I won't bother holding my breath though.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

@ Hachi "So much for 'protect and serve" yer more like deflect and swerve.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I would be more concerned with the gambling cop who owes money to the yakuza

1 ( +3 / -2 )

This is disgraceful to the ideal of police. A policeman, before or after becoming one, in gambling debt, stealing money from elderly people,... Is called a criminal. Japan is a land of extremes, yet such disgust happens worldwide. They have to do a better job distributing the rights to protect harmony in their own nation.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

How on earth do they screen applicants to the police force. The J-force is a joke to many people.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

How on earth do they screen applicants to the police force

The same way they screen applicants to be "idols". You're young, and you have a pulse. Welcome to the force.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

How on earth do they screen applicants to the police force.

Interviewer: Are you into upskirt photography, stealing panties etc? Applicant: Er...yes. Interviewer: Congratulations, you"re in!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

"quoted by police as saying"

"he stole the money to pay back gambling debts"

Humpty Dumpty is on a roll...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Agree with the above posters. The cops seem to be in the news alot these days...

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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