crime

Prosecutors decide not to try suspect over murder of company president in Aichi

12 Comments

Prosecutors in Toyota City, Aichi Prefecture, have dropped their indictment of a 40-year-old man arrested on suspicion of killing the 61-year-old president of an auto repair company in June.

Prosecutors made the decision after a three-month psychiatric examination of the suspect concluded on Tuesday, Sankei Shimbun reported. As is customary, prosecutors did not specify the reason for dropping the indictment.

The suspect, a temp worker whose address is unknown, was accused of killing Yasutsugu Nakane, president of Arcadia Co, sometime between 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on June 6. A friend discovered Nakane’s body in his office. Police said he had been beaten about the head several times with a blunt object.

Surveillance camera footage showed the suspect leaving in a car from Nakane’s company on the day of the murder. Police detained him at a shopping mall in Kariya City, Aichi Prefecture, the next day. Police said he admitted to the charge but denied intent to kill.

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12 Comments
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Ah, the old Japanese tradition of keeping the justice system as opaque as possible, so the public have no idea why decisions are made. That'll inspire trust!

8 ( +11 / -3 )

As is customary, prosecutors did not specify the reason for dropping the indictment.

Bad custom. Started to protect those who can afford to pay off the victim? Or protect the incompetence of prosecutors in finding real evidence (vs confessions)?

4 ( +7 / -3 )

The elusive & innumerable Japanese criminal justice system ‘unicorn’: a 1%’er!

Some cases must be acquiesced to maintain that 99% conviction rate.

- “Police said he had been beaten about the head several times with a blunt object. Surveillance camera footage showed the suspect leaving in a car from Nakane’s company. He admitted to the charge but denied intent to kill.” -

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Well done, Japan!” for continuing to instill public confidence. Another case that cannot be successfully prosecuted due to “mental health issues” yet no disposition of the suspect is disclosed either?

- “Prosecutors made the decision after a 3-month psychiatric examination of the suspect concluded on Tues” -

Free to go, birdy! Perhaps back into society to offend again sometime, soon ?

- “prosecutors did not specify the reason for dropping the indictment.”

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Ah, the old Japanese tradition of keeping the justice system as opaque as possible, so the public have no idea why decisions are made. That'll inspire trust!

Well, "justice" in Japan has worked this way for centuries and there is no reason to change now just because the system of governance has recently been re-branded as a "democracy". "The public needs to know" and "the truth shall set you free" are alien concepts inimical to thought-control by the powers-that-be who always "know best".

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The elusive & innumerable Japanese criminal justice system ‘unicorn’: a 1%’er!

Some cases must be acquiesced to maintain that 99% conviction rate.

I thought the 1/99 rate was for those indictments that result in an acquittal. In this case, the prosecutors didn't indict. It would be interesting to know the percentage of arrests that lead to a decision not to indict (unfortunately, we don't have the data to see a breakdown of the reasons!)

1 ( +2 / -1 )

You gotta love Japan's justice system. (sarcasm) How else can you get away with murder, by claiming lunacy. Salut to Japanese justice and their near 100% conviction rate!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

He confessed, so the real reason prosecutors decided not to try him is the case is related to yakuza. Prosecutors are scared. A homeless person does not just walk in to a a construction company's president's office and beat him to death for no reason.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Seriously! The man confessess, hopefully without sleep deprivation and interrogation, no mental health issues, and they drop the charge?

mmmmm,

not even assault?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Confessions should be all dismissed, unless you do it with your lawyer present.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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