crime

Mass killing raises questions about security in Japan

47 Comments
By KEN MORITSUGU and SATOSHI SUGIYAMA

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47 Comments
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If somebody wants to kill a bunch of people, and actually takes the time to plan it out, no security system is going to stop them.

I'd be more worried about WHY people would want to do that, rather than try to create a bunch of useless security measures.

17 ( +24 / -7 )

Rare mass killing raises questions about security in Japan

No it doesn't. This was a crime committed by a mentally disturbed man who, like far too many people in the world, but Japan in particular, flys under the mental health radar. Unless he had made repeated, unanomous threats, it is unlikely anything could have been done to prevent this tragedy short of posting a trained guard at the entrance. one of the last things this kind of institution in Japan would have thought necessary.

No one could have anticipated this and even in doing so, the "normal" world is full of soft targets that if all protected would bring the world to a grinding halt.

14 ( +24 / -10 )

If he used to work there, chances are his mental illness was exacerbated by the place and people. Not condoning, but this was likely seen and they terminated him after continuing or making worse arguments or fights (maybe instigated by) with the disabled.

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

As the almost daily atrocities in Germany, France, USA, Japan etc show, it doesn't take much for a lone-wolf psycho, affiliated with Daesh or not, to think of a way to massacre innocent people, be it with a knife, gun, machete, bomb, lorry... God only knows what will be next. The only thing for certain is that we won't have to wait long for the next one.

Lock your doors and watch your back.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

The title of this article should be "Rare mass killing raises questions about government and police incompetence."

He wrote to Parliament outlining the bloody plan and saying all disabled should be put to death

A letter was written describing and telegraphing the upcoming massacre that just occurred to the government. The police nor did social services hold or prevent him from carrying this out.

Japan is a pretty safe society but with dumb bumbling "leaders" and law "enforcement".

30 ( +32 / -2 )

Another factor contributing to Japan’s sense of safety, Komiya said, is the fact that the island country has never been invaded.

Where do these "experts" come from? I see them all the time on telly making up ridiculous theories bases on nothing much. How does this relate to a nut job committing mass murder? The US should be a haven of peace in that case and I seem to recall Japan being invaded in 1945.

11 ( +17 / -6 )

"Security" is a euphemism for State power. Vigilance on the part of individuals is needed, not increased security measures by Big Bro. As other commenters have said, these types of atrocities simply cannot be prevented by planning to thwart them ahead of time. Now there is a knife attack at a mental institution. Another knife attack at another mental institution is unlikely in the near future. So, what's the next threat? Could be anything. Could involve knives, poison, acid, fire, gas, debris on a shinkansen track, releasing a starving bear in a school yard, putting liquid mercury in people's unattended shoes in an entryway.. You look one way and the attack comes from the other. We need more observant and brave people, not "security."

10 ( +13 / -3 )

RE: The killing of 19 people at a home for the mentally disabled raised questions about whether Japan’s reputation as one of the safest countries in the world is creating a false sense of security.

No way that this statement holds truth about Japans reputation and safety. The individual was mentally unstable but the doctor released him anyway. The doctor is responsible for allowing this person out of their care. That is the problem not the act by one. There is no need to overburden Japan's security system as it already is safe and tight enough. Japan does not need to become a police state. Immigration does its part well to make sure the real terrorists coming who are born and bred from those areas do not come into Japan.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Security in Japan is fundamentally sound. Why? Because they understand fundamental domestic tranquility does not come from bigger walls and stronger weapons.

It comes from social order.

8 ( +14 / -6 )

I just watched CNN. At the end of the coverage of this story, the announcer said "this is the largest massacre in Japan since WWII". Is he saying WWII was a "massacre"? OK, a little off topic, but he should chose is words more carefully. You know what the far right would say if they saw this. This would be politicized.

-4 ( +7 / -11 )

"this is the largest massacre in Japan since WWII"

Just meaning "in recent history", no?

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Random observations:

1) If this had happened at an office, school, park, it would be even bigger news here. Anecdotal evidence only but the people in my small world seem to care less because it happened to "those" disabled people.

2) Every article in Japanese I've read has made note of his tattoo and his marijuana use. Indeed, there must be causation there.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Another factor contributing to Japan’s sense of safety, Komiya said, is the fact that the island country has never been invaded.

Huh?

12 ( +16 / -4 )

Hell.....it wasn't such a bad post, guess the mods have pms today.

Moderator: Please do not insult the moderators or you will be suspended from the discussion board. You know very well why your post was removed.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I was also watching the CNN report and heard the WW2 comment. I also noticed how the reporter was able to slip in ISIS and Al Qauda in his report claiming that the attack had nothing to do with them, but then why even mention it! Just keep the fear machine running. Also on NHK, the made a big deal about how his marijuana use had changed him, and by association we can assume that was the cause of his mental instability.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Mass killing raises questions about mental healthcare in Japan

fixed it for ya.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

In hindsight, the government would've done more good if they sent their anti-terror security at this facility instead of this upcoming fireworks display event....

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It seems psychopath's action who usually looks normal is very hard to be stopped before commiting such crime. Probably more security guards and cameras should be put everywhere. That big facility has almost no security guard and no inside camera and no alarm for breaking in.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

In vulnerable places such as this, needs an access control system only those who are authorize can access the premises. If those high-ends jewelry shops have those types of alarm what more in a facility like this whose lives are way more important.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

gokai_wo_maneku at Jul. 27, 2016 - 07:34AM JST "I just watched CNN. At the end of the coverage of this story, the announcer said "this is the largest massacre in Japan since WWII". Is he saying WWII was a "massacre""

I doubt it. It is just mirroring the common practice in Japanese media to refer to historical incidents, crime, any matter of statistics, etc as being either pre-war or post-war.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Japanese people are too trustworthy. These businesses should install more security camera systems to act as a deterrent as they can be placed anywhere as long as there is a power source close by. One cannot stress enough on the importance of real cameras as a solid security measure. Security cameras are extremely helpful as they enable you to monitor the activities of people visiting your home or business as well as the goings-on at these places. This is a great way to detect suspicious people and keep tabs on their activities. The front desk should have somebody to monitor activities all the time. As it happens, they can call police immediately for assistance and not lose time.

This is particularly helpful when dealing with a legal scenario, wherein the eye witness may have forgotten a certain important detail or may be providing with an accurate account of what really transpired. With a security camera, the legal authorities can see the series of events as they really unfolded.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The coverage on Japanese TV last night was classic 'head in the sand'. Here a suspect wrote in detail what he would do and WHERE he would do it. He was interviewed by police after voicing the same views AT the place. He was briefly detained and then released, only to go on to do what he said he would. In interviews representatives from the Police and the from the mental health assessor said they would need to see 'if procedures needed to be changed' and even went so far as to say that his released 'was the right thing to do as they believed he had been cured'. People should be fired. The families should sue all the parties involved and the government should make a stand. But oh wait, this is Japan. Let's do nothing.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Questions that will see panels cost us millions just to be ignored and nothing done.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

":...cost us millions just to be ignored and nothing done"

And yet, somehow, despite all the apparent nonsense, Japan has accomplished what no other civilization on the planet has:

a metropolitan area of 23 million packed liked sardines and a violent crime rate roughly equivalent to the Sargasso Sea.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

One of the most important security elements is a strong reaction....people here are quite passive in emergencies, waiting for authorities to come. Many of the public knife attacks could be stopped by a few citizens rushing the attacker with a trash can or suitcase or bicycle...all you have to do is get him down. I remember one attack maybe 15 years ago that ended when a janitor used his broom to shove the guy off a train platform...giving time for people to escape and police to arrive.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@Jeff Huffman

Hell YES! ABOSOLUTELY

**Rare mass killing raises questions about security in Japan

No it doesn't. This was a crime committed by a mentally disturbed man who, like far too many people in the world, but Japan in particular, flys under the mental health radar. Unless he had made repeated, unanomous threats, it is unlikely anything could have been done to prevent this tragedy short of posting a trained guard at the entrance. one of the last things this kind of institution in Japan would have thought necessary.

No one could have anticipated this and even in doing so, the "normal" world is full of soft targets that if all protected would bring the world to a grinding halt.**

but what do expect from US post traumatic particle syndrome, xenophobia and yellow supremacy

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@ashsensei "this is the largest massacre in Japan since WWII"

"Just meaning "in recent history", no?"

Looks like the jn on jn murder rate just went through the roof.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Such crime seems only matter of time if there are no security guards and cameras and no alarms for breaking in such big facility. It would happen again at less secure places as another psycho imitates.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Come on. He telegraphed precisely what he was going to do in a letter and no one took notice or investigated it.

Don't question "security in Japan," question the stupidity and negligence of the Diet member or police who failed to follow up on this. The letter itself was a direct threat.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Because such massacres are rare, Japan has become overconfident about its safety, a Japanese criminologist said.

Wrong. 'Such massacres' are rare anywhere except for the US and very recently France. Japan has had as many massacres as any nation, if not more; you have Akihabara attack, the sarin gas attack and now this = seems about the same number anywhere else in the world, am I wrong?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

...like far too many people in the world, but Japan in particular, flys under the mental health radar.

What radar???? Mental health here is largely ignore and pushed underground due to the embarrassment is causes on family members. Pretty much everyday I see people with serious mental health issues out walking the streets alone. The stigma here is horrific and like many other things here, most locals would rather ignore the issue than actually admit there is a problem. Until Japan comes to terms that is has a high number of serious metal health issues within the general population things like this will continue - be it regular depression, PPD, stress...

What I find "interesting" about this article is the fact that stalkers are not mentioned. How many people have been stabbed by them? How many of the victims actually went to the police and they didn't do anything? Until the government, cops and soviet realize just how scary things are here with regards to their lack of mental help support, the cycle will continue.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

They had this nutter in lock down for 14 days and two "2 " yes two Doctor deem him fit for release.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@ igloobuyer

"Because such massacres are rare, Japan has become overconfident about its safety, a Japanese criminologist said." "Wrong. 'Such massacres' are rare anywhere except for the US and very recently France. Japan has had as many massacres as any nation, if not more; you have Akihabara attack, the sarin gas attack and now this = seems about the same number anywhere else in the world, am I wrong?"

Right on! igloobuyer

this "Japanese criminologist", sounds like selective amnesia

5 ( +5 / -0 )

you have Akihabara attack, the sarin gas attack and now this = seems about the same number anywhere else in the world, am I wrong?

Sarin gas attack by Aum cult in Tokyo 1995 - 13 people killed and so many wounded. Osaka Ikeda elementary school stabbing attack by a psycho in Osaka 2001 - 8 students killed. Akihabara truck attack and stabbing in Tokyo 2008 - 7 people killed. And nursing facility stabbing attack in Kanagawa 2016 - 19 people killed.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

TBH, I don't really see any drastic changes needed in public security, but definitely needs to be better scrutiny of mental health triggers in people. Japan is by far one of the safest countries on Earth and 1 psycho isn't going to change that

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Another factor contributing to Japan’s sense of safety, Komiya said, is the fact that the island country has never been invaded.

Come again? Just keep grinding that salt into the ol' Okinawa respect department.

Meanwhile it is a statement that doesn't make any sense. This has nothing do to with a 26 year old assailant. Crime is merely low, not because of not being invaded. I can't even....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

domtoidi at Jul. 27, 2016 - 10:44AM JST "Come on. He telegraphed precisely what he was going to do in a letter and no one took notice or investigated it."

Nonsense. The letter was immediately turned over to police, Uematsu lost his job and was forcibly hospitalized because if it. The timing and circumstances of his release are another matter but what you stated is just plain untrue.

sfjp330, "These businesses should install more security camera systems to act as a deterrent "

This facility recently increased the number of security cameras to 16 because of the problems with Uematsu. I don't know what procedures were in place for observing the monitors.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's not a security issue, it's a stupidity issue. The country is no more or less safe because of what happened. The doctor should never have let the man go.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

In point of fact, there is no way to prevent all such attacks even if windows are barred, staffing levels increased and trained securty staff employed. Nevertheless, from the evidence that has emerged thus far, it appears that the police, the doctor who released this madman, and the facility were all seriously remiss in their responsibility to protect the residents. This absolutely beggars belief.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@smithinjapan "It's not a security issue, it's a stupidity issue. The country is no more or less safe because of what happened. The doctor should never have let the man go.

You nailed it!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

SmithinJapan: That was two doctors and he still got released. Like there is illegal immigrants in lock up awaiting adjudication on visa,s who are in no way dangerous. but they let this nutter out alone in the community without any assureities. Like a Parents, Brother , notifying the local Koban.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"Mass killing raises questions about security in Japan."

No it doesn't.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

One man. A knife. 45 minutes. One man who told authorities this is what he was going to do at this place. Offensive/vulgar.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Yes.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There is a reason why they call them psychopaths. AFAIK from doctors in Denmark, psychopaths is often defined by their actions and and things they do right after. The reason why is, that psychopaths are immensely clever, and calculative but they miss remorse. The more violence you show on TV the more psychopathic tendencies you will trigger. Be aware that since they are clever they can separate movies and real life, so the violence they need to see and hear about should be in the news etc. Things that actually happen. At the point where a psychopath starts planning to kill people its almost impossible to stop him.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

'Such massacres' are rare anywhere except for the US and very recently France...Am I wrong?

Yes, you are wrong. You just don't hear or don't care to learn about all the violence and murders in places like Venezuela and Honduras, Jamaica and South Africa -- all of which have a murder rate at least 10x that of the US and France.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_intentional_homicide_rate#United_States

Mass killings in the US and France are noteworthy, evidently, because too many seem to think American and European lives count more. I find that perception disgusting.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

There's a lot more of these guys walking the streets of Japan they just haven't turned themselves in yet. They are just waiting to go off at any second!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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